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"•rth Carolina *at. Library 

STATE C>F NORTH CAROLINA 






TWENTY-SECOND REPORT 

OF THE 

Corporation Commission 



FOR THE 



BIENNIAL PERIOD, 19234924 



COMPILATIONS FROM RAILROAD RETURNS AREIFOR 
YEARS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1922 AND 1923 



RALEIGH 

Mitchell Printtxo Compant 

State Printers 

1925 



£*P*f 



f 



STATE OF NORT T d[ CAROLINA 
CORPORATION COMMISSION 



W. T. LEE, Chairman; 
GEORGE P. PELL, 
A. J. MAXWELL, 

Commissioners. 

R. O. Self, Cleric. Mary Shaw, Stenographer. 

Elsie G. Riddick, Assistant Clerk. Rebecca Merritt, Stenographer. 



RATE DEPARTMENT 

W. G. Womble, Rate Clerk. 
Edgar Womble, Assistant Clerk. 
Frances T. Abernethy, Stenographer. 
J. A. Bland, Freight Clerk. 

BANKING DEPARTMENT 

Clarence Latham, Chief State Bank Examiner 

State Bank Examiners 

John Mitchell, R. E. Kerr, 

W. L. Williams 

Assistant State Bank Examiners 

L. H. Harrison, D. M. Darden, 

G. N. Henson. 



C. C. Meroney, Bank Clerk. 

Mabel Morris, Assistant Bank Clerk. 

Bessie Folk, Stenograph e?\ 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



Raleigh, K C, January 2, 1925. 

To Hi^s Excellency, Cameron Morrison, 

Governor of North Carolina. 

Sir : — As required by Section 1065, Chapter 21, Consolidated Statutes, 
the Corporation Commission has the honor to report for the biennial 
period 1923 and 1924: 

In our last report we dealt at length upon the complexities of railroad 
and public utility regulation, and will therefore, omit such generalities 
in this report, and deal specifically with the several classes of utilities 
under our jurisdiction and our work in the line of duty of regulation. 

LESS CARLOAD FREIGHT MOVEMENT 

The Commission's last report called to your attention and that of the 
General Assembly the unsatisfactory handling of less carload shipments 
of freight to and from points within the State, and in' pursuance thereof 
the General Assembly of 1923 passed an act appropriating the sum of 
$5,000 per year for a period of two years to be used for the purpose of 
investigating the movement of such freight, with a view to improving 
the time of such movement. 

In pursuance of this specific legislative authority, on May 15, 1923, 
we employed a freight inspector who possessed competent knowledge of 
the intricate details of the handling of less than carload shipments of 
freight. 

Exhaustive investigations were made at the following points : South 
Rocky Mount, Selma, Fayetteville, Goldsboro, Greensboro, Spencer 
Transfer, Charlotte and Asheville, and the findings made of record and 
copies with recommendations submitted to the railroads. Briefly, the 
findings in and the results of these investigations are as follows : 

South Rocky Mount. — Many conditions and practices prevailed which 
seriously handicapped an expeditious handling and movement of intra- 
state less than carload freight through this point, namely, many cars 
arriving during one day were not transferred until the following day; 
considerable delay occurred due to the failure to place merchandise 
package cars for transferring promptly on arrival and to forward cars 
promptly loaded for outbound movement; the track space or yard 
facilities were inadequate to handle all traffic without delay; traffic 
was not in every instance loaded to the best possible advantage from a 
service standpoint ; and the bulk of the less carload freight moving from 
Piedmont and Western North Carolina to Eastern North Carolina, 
which moves through this transfer, was not afforded a prompt movement 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



taking from ten to fourteen days to transport less carload freight from 
such points as High Point, Winston-Salem, Statesville and Charlotte 
to Eastern North Carolina destinations. 

The railroad has complied with the request for an elimination of 
existing delays in placing cars for transfer, and it is now the practice 
to place in transfer sheds all merchandise cars arriving up to 3 
p.m. daily. The railroad has complied with the request, as far as the 
present facilities will permit, that the delay in forwarding merchandise 
cars be eliminated. "While this phase of the service has not been reme- 
died in full, it does appear that it is improving, and that with continued 
effort in this direction it will finally be eliminated. The local officials 
are, of course, unable to comply with the request concerning yard facili- 
ties ; however, they have been and are now handling the matter with the 
directors. This matter is also being handled with the executive officials 
by the Commission. Many other changes affecting the handling of less 
carload freight were made. The following statement will show in some 
measure the effect the various changes have had on the movement of 
traffic between Piedmont and "Western North Carolina points and 
Eastern North Carolina points : 



Number 
Shipments 


Weight 


From — 


Miles to 
South 
Rocky- 
Mount, 
N. C. 


Average Number 

Days in Transit to 

South Rocky Mount, 

N. C, During— 


* Reduction 

of Time in 

Transit 




June, 1923 


Nov., 1924 




9 


7598 

26992 

17399 

9694 

7589 

7710 

23988 

31054 

51349 


Charlotte 


255 
226 
166 
180 
161 
119 
70 
42 


7.4 
7.9 
6.3 
7.0 
5.8 
6.4 
3.0 
2.7 
7.0 


4.0 
4.8 
3.6 
4.0 
1.3 
5.0 
1.5 
0.5 
3.2 


3.4 


17 


3.1 


39 


High Point.... 


2.7 


15 

15 

12 


Winston-Salem 

Greensboro 


3.0 
4.5 
1.4 


73 




1.5 


41 




2.2 


67. . 




4.7 











*Days per shipment. 

The schedule of less carload freight from Spencer Transfer, Greens- 
boro, Durham and Kaleigh to South Kocky Mount is one day. The 
statement shows, for instance, the time in transit from Kaleigh to be one 
and five-tenths days, and from Greensboro one and three-tenths days; 
this is due to the fact that at the time the investigation was made a 
number of merchandise cars missed connection at Selma, which accounts 
for the five-tenths and three-tenths of a day. This advanced schedule 
makes it possible for the packing houses of Kaleigh, for instance, to work 
the Eastern North Carolina territory and obtain prompt deliveries of 
their shipments destined to Atlantic Coast Line stations. Prior to June, 
1923, a shipment of smoked sausage, for instance, would have spoiled 
before deliverv could have been effected. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 5 

The manufacturing centers of our State are now in a better position 
to meet the Virginia and Eastern cities competition to Eastern North 
Carolina, due to the fact that their freight service is substantially as 
prompt as that obtained from Virginia and Eastern cities to Eastern 
North Carolina destinations situated on and served by the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad. 

Goldsboro. — The interchange of intrastate traffic between the Southern 
Eailway and the Norfolk Southern Railroad was found to be slow at 
this point. The carriers were requested to make certain changes which 
eliminated from twenty-four to thirty-six hours delay. This change 
resulted in a more satisfactory service to points between Goldsboro and 
New Bern on the Norfolk Southern Railroad. However, this service 
is not yet entirely satisfactory, but continued improvement is expected. 

The interchange of carload traffic, fertilizer in particular, between 
the Atlantic Coast Line Railway and the Southern Railway, was investi- 
gated, and it was found that the greatest delay was with the Southern 
Railway; therefore, certain revisions in freight train schedules were 
effected, which eliminated approximately two days delay to this traffic. 

Spencer Transfer. — This is one of the largest concentration points for 
less carload freight in the United States. Investigation discloses what 
apparently is delay; however, a very close check of the placing of mer- 
chandise cars for transfer results in the question of whether or not 
the apparent delay is unreasonable, when considered with all the condi- 
tions and circumstances connected therewith. It is noted that there has 
been some improvement in this feature of the service. 

Request for certain changes in train schedules and requests to handle 
certain merchandise cars in certain through daily trains were complied 
with. These changes resulted in a more prompt service to such points 
as Hickory, Lenoir, Marion, Asheville, Canton, Waynesville, Henderson- 
ville, and others; that is to say, the changes enabled the railroad to fur- 
nish a daily local service for approximately two hundred and fifty miles 
from Spencer Transfer. 

The railroad was requested to reduce the minimum per car tonnage 
from ten thousand pounds to five thousand pounds on intrastate traffic, 
which request was complied with. This change assures the loading and 
running daily of all cars to intrastate points. 

Certain requests for a revision in the loading of traffic to Eastern 
North Carolina points were complied with, which has eliminated from 
two to three days delay on this traffic. 

The car for Winston-Salem has been placed on a 'daily schedule and 
is now moving in the most satisfactory manner. 

Greensboro. — Greensboro, on account of its location, is one of the most 
important points in the State from a less carload freight standpoint, 
and it needs increased facilities very badly. 

The railroad, even with its handicap in facilities, has been able to 
comply with request for the elimination of a considerable amount of 



6 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

delay to traffic to Eastern North Carolina points. The request for a 
daily package car to Asheville was complied with. This change, or 
increase in car loading, has eliminated from two to three days delay to 
Western North Carolina traffic. 

The Commission has not deemed it wise to require the construction 
of a new freight depot at this point, due to the fact that the contem- 
plated passenger depot is under consideration; however, the matter will 
be handled just as soon as the plans for the passenger depot assume a 
more definite shape. 

Fayetteville. — Investigation of this point was made for the purpose of 
determining whether or not the Atlantic Coast Line would be in a better 
position to render a more prompt movement of less carload freight 
through this transfer after the new yard was completed. 

It was found that there was some delay in placing merchandise cars 
at the warehouse and in forwarding them after loading for outbound 
movement. This delay was due to a lack of yard space or facilities. 
The Milan yard, with a car capacity of approximately eight hundred 
cars, has been completed and advice has been received from the railroad 
that the delay which formerly existed does not obtain now. 

The request for additional warehouse track space was complied with 
and the railroad advises that plans for additional warehouse space are 
now under consideration. 

Asheville. — The facilities at Asheville for handling less carload freight 
were found to be inadequate. Considerable delay to this class of traffic 
was found to exist on account of a lack of yard facilities as well as 
warehouse facilities. 

The question of improved facilities for Asheville was taken up with 
the carrier, and work is now under way. The carrier advises that as 
soon as the additional tracks in the yard are completed the facilities at 
the freight station will be improved. 

Charlotte. — The investigation indicates that a considerable amount of 
traffic originating at Charlotte proper was not forwarded until the 
succeeding day after receipt. A second visit indicates that this delay 
does not obtain now. 

Additional warehouse track space is needed, and advice has been 
received to the effect that plans for the construction of an additional 
warehouse track are being given consideration by carrier management. 

Revisions in out-bound loading which have advanced the movement 
of less carload traffic from this point were requested and complied with 
by the carrier. 

Upon complaint, the movement of less carload freight from Greens- 
boro to Norfolk Southern points moving through Raleigh was investi- 
gated, and certain requests were made and complied with, which have 
eliminated a delay of thirty-six hours to this traffic; the movement of 
less carload freight from Gastonia to Gibsonville was investigated and 
certain revisions in the loading from Charlotte were made with a saving 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



in time of approximately three days; the movement of less carload 
freight from Charlotte to Lenoir was investigated, and revisions in the 
loading were made, which has resulted in a saving in time of from two 
to three days; the movement of less carload freight from "Wendell to 
Burlington was investigated, and a delay of twenty-four hours was 
eliminated at Raleigh, and is still under advisement for further ad- 
justment. 

Various complaints relative to the movement of less carload freight 
between Piedmont and Western North Carolina and Eastern North 
Carolina points have been investigated and the service between these 
two sections has been advanced to an appreciable extent. 

The unsatisfactory handling of less carload freight between Piedmont 
and Western North Carolina and Eastern North Carolina has been the 
cause of complaint for the past several years. While the service between 
two points on the same railroad is important, the west-east movement 
is of more importance to the building up of internal commerce and in 
many other respects. Effort has been centered upon this situation and 
valuable results have been obtained; however, the Commission is con- 
vinced that the service to points in Eastern North Carolina east of 
Goldsboro should be placed on a better schedule, and with continued 
effort in this direction it will be obtained. 

The carriers opposed very vigorously the recommendations of the 
Commission and shippers before the committees of the last regular 
session of the Legislature, but, since the passage of the act, the carriers 
have cooperated in every possible way, and now appear to appreciate 
the fact that this service is beneficial to both carrier and shipper. 

Discriminations in service are as bad, if not worse, than rate dis- 
crimination, and it presents a question almost as large. Intrastate 
distribution of less carload freight is handicapped to some extent on 
account of the volume; however, service is a necessary adjunct to 
increasing this volume of traffic; therefore, it becomes necessary to 
ascertain whether or not the volume of traffic is accorded the service to 
which it is entitled. 

The investigations and findings reported above have been confined 
principally to the Southern Railway and Atlantic Coast Line points 
for the reason that the great majority of less carload shipments are 
handled by these carriers. Transfer points between these roads and 
other roads could not be reached within the time which has transpired 
since the passage of this act, with the limited appropriation enabling 
the Commission to employ only one inspector for the work. If this 
appropriation is continued as the Commission has requested in its 
estimate to the Budget Commission, it will be possible, within the next 
twelve months, to make a study of the smaller transfer points between 
these other roads, and also continue to supervise schedules and large 
transfer points referred to, with a view to a more expeditious handling 
of this traffic. 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CLASSIFICATION AND RATE REVISION 



During the years 1923-1924, the Commission made general changes 
in classifications and rates as follows : 

Agricultural implements, namely, cotton planters and fertilizer dis- 
tributors, in less carload lots, reducing the rates within the State to the 
same as that applicable on cultivators. 

Mixed carload rates within the State were established on cement and 
lime at the cement rates. 

The description in classification of showcases was changed to remove 
restriction of entire boxing. 

Basic rates were reduced on fresh fish and rolling stock equipment. 

Packing requirements were changed on peanuts, in less than carload 
lots, resulting in a reduction in rates. 

Rates on chifforobes in less carload quantities were reduced to the 
same level as chiffoniers. 

Rates on veneer and built-up wood, both carload and less, were reduced 
to conform to relationship to lumber rates, which relationship to inter- 
state rates was established by the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Livestock rates, carload, including rates on beef and stocker cattle, 
calves, hogs, sheep, goats, horses and mules, were revised to conform to 
scale of rates approved by North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation. 

Rates on heavy load bearing tile, in carloads, were reduced to bear 
relationship to brick rates. 

New minimum was established on wood, for fuel purposes, to conform 
more nearly to loading capacity of cars. 

Commodity rates were reduced throughout the State on marble, 
granite and stone; namely, curbing, paving blocks, in dimension or 
random. 

Joint line commodity rates on crushed and rubble stone were estab- 
lished to apply between Barham Siding, on the Montgomery Lumber 
Railroad Company, on the one hand, and all points reached via the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, within the State, on the other hand. 
This case was appealed by the railroads and the commission was sus- 
tained by both the Superior and the Supreme Courts. 

Rates on the following applicable within the State were revised and 
brought forward in the records of the Commission, and in convenient 
form for public distribution, to conform to basis authorized by the 
Federal authorities during Federal control, and subsequently approved 
by this Commission, namely, class rates, both single and joint line for 
trunk line application, cotton seed and cottonseed hulls carload and less, 
petroleum, carload, molasses in barrels and hogsheads, demurrage, stor- 
age and switching rules and charges. 

Cotton transit privileges were established at Greensboro. The Atlan- 
tic Coast Line Railroad appealed from the order of the Commission and 
the case is now pending in the Superior Court of Wake County. The 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 9 

Commission issued an order on its own motion defining intrastate traffic 
as differentiated from interstate traffic on business moving from the port 
of Wilmington to all points within the State. This case is now pending 
in the Federal Courts. 

ADJUSTMENTS OF OVERCHARGES 

The subject of overcharges continues to be of great importance, but 
through the joint efforts of the Commission, and the shippers, the volume 
is probably not increasing in proportion to the increase in traffic. We 
are unable to estimate the amount of refunds due to overcharges and 
errors in tariffs. Where adjustments are made in one freight bill, the 
shipper and carrier often make similar adjustments on all bills over a 
period of years or during the period of the shipper's operations, which 
in numerous cases often amount to considerable money. 

STATION SERVICE 

Section 1040 of the Consolidated Statutes empowers the Commission 
to require, where public necessity demands, and it is demonstrated that 
the revenue received will be sufficient to justify it, the establishment of 
stations, and provided that no station shall be established nearer to 
another station than five miles, but the statute does not prohibit the 
railroad from voluntarily establishing stations, both agency and non- 
agency, within less than five miles of another station. Temporary 
manufacturing interests, such as lumbering, quarrying, etc., have led to 
the establishment of many such stations within one, two and three miles 
of other stations. 

Section 1051, Consolidated Statutes, requires the consent of the Com- 
mission before any passenger station or freight depot can be abandoned 
or the service diminished. This has led to the filing of many petitions 
either for the abandonment of stations which have been established for 
a temporary industry, or for the diminishing of certain service, such as 
reducing agency stations to non-agency stations with prepay privileges. 
Where improved roads parallel the short-line railroads, automotive 
transportation competition has reduced station receipts and the number 
of persons patronizing the stations until many have become practically 
obsolete and have been closed. Where the service at such stations has 
been reduced, caretakers have been provided for all places where there 
was evidence of appreciable business of an intermittent nature, for the 
purpose of warehousing freight from the weather for the convenience 
of the consignee. Probably 95 per cent of the volume of busi- 
ness at such small stations is heavy carload freight, such as fertilizers 
and grain inbound, and lumber, cotton and tobacco outbound, and does 
not need warehouse or agency service for the reason that it is either 
not damaged by weather or is loaded into or from the car and can be 
billed by the local freight conductors. 



10 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

CONSTRUCTION OF STATION BUILDINGS 

It was necessary for the Commission to go into the Superior Court to 
enforce its orders requiring the construction of the union stations at 
Selma and Kinston, and also for a station at Newton. The Southern 
withdrew its appeal when the Newton case came to trial. The Southern 
Railway Company was the appellant in the Selma case and the Norfolk- 
Southern Railroad Company in the Kinston case. All of the above 
named stations have been completed on plans approved by the Commis- 
sion, and are now in use, except that at Newton, which is ready for 
occupancy upon completion of walkways. Petitions for the erection of 
stations at Lexington and Mooresville were pending before the Commis- 
sion when the Southern Railway Company voluntarily consented to the 
erection of both. The Burlington station was relocated and a new 
station was built at Parmelee, and the railroad voluntarily agreed to the 
erection of a union station at Winston-Salem, the location of which was 
approved by the Commission after hearing upon complaint. A petition 
was pending for the construction of a station at Cherryville when the 
Seaboard Air Line consented to construction, and the same is now 
nearly completed. 

PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE 

For the year 1923, forty-six railroads operated 4,858.27 miles of road. 

Exclusive of thirty-nine short lines, the seven major lines, viz., the 
Atlantic Coast Line, Clinchfleld, Seaboard Air Line, Southern, Norfolk 
Southern, Norfolk and "Western, and the Atlantic and Yadkin, operate 
daily 380 passenger trains in North Carolina. 

It is difficult and hazardous to operate fast trains over single-track 
lines, but the volume of business became such that all stops were elimi- 
nated between Goldsboro and Greensboro, except Selma, Raleigh, Dur- 
ham and Burlington, for trains 21 and 22. This permitted a material 
shortening of this schedule. 

Passenger train service on short lines has been reduced as follows : 

Between High Point and Randleman. 

Between Salisbury and Albemarle. 

Between Greensboro and Ramseur. 

Between Tarboro and Fountain. 

Between New Bern and Bayboro. 

Between Rutherfordton and Charlotte. 

And petitions are pending for the discontinuance of trains 107, 108, 
113 and 114, and the substitution of one train in each direction daily 
from Keysville, Va., to Durham. Where such service has been 
discontinued, mixed freight and passenger service has usually been 
substituted. 

In some sections of the State it is necessary to increase the passenger 
service for seasonal traffic. This applies particularly to the Southern, 
Seaboard Air Line, and in a small degree to the Atlantic Coast Line and 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 11 

Norfolk Southern. This usually requires an entire rearrangement of 
schedules for the increase of passenger trains with a corresponding 
rearrangement of schedules for reduction. "We try at all times to 
provide for the reasonable service that the traffic demands, but our 
industrious city fathers, and their guardians, the chamber of commerce 
and boards of trade, are loth to surrender anything which is once estab- 
lished, even temporarily, and which makes for their industrial prowess, 
and thus the resorts of summer in the east and west and of the winter 
resorts in the south bring before us their annual quota of questions for 
adjustment. 

In making schedules it is not always possible to make all trains con- 
nect at all junction points, because some connections are vastly more 
important than others. Every railroad has its important junction 
points, through which the great majority of its passengers travel; there- 
fore, it occurs frequently that schedules are often made which do not 
require connections between certain trains at certain points. There are 
instances where to do so would neglect the greater interest of the public. 

THE PULLMAN COMPANY 

"We now have the best Pullman service that has ever been operated in 
North Carolina. Sleeping cars are operated over 1,913 miles of road. 
Regular service is operated between Asheville and Raleigh; Winston- 
Salem, Greensboro and Goldsboro; Charlotte and Wilmington; and be- 
tween Wilmington, New Bern, Charlotte, Raleigh, Asheville and Win- 
ston-Salem and intervening points in this State and northern and eastern 
points outside of the State. Regular and seasonal service is operated 
between Hendersonville, Asheville, Charlotte, Wilmington, in this State, 
and southern points outside the State and between Goldsboro and Ashe- 
ville and points intervening in this State and Cincinnati. 

The above is exclusive of the through main-line service on the trunk 
lines of the Southern, Seaboard Air Line, Atlantic Coast Line and 
Norfolk and Western, and the Winston-Salem Southbound. 

PULLMAN SURCHARGE 

While the railroads were under Federal control, a surcharge of fifty 
per cent was added to Pullman fare, which went to the credit of the 
railroad carrier, no part of which went to the credit of the Pullman 
Company. After the war, this was continued by the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission. Several states had made efforts to eliminate it from 
the intrastate traffic. 

The last regular session of the General Assembly passed an act making 
it unlawful for an agent or an employee of the Pullman Company to 
collect such a surcharge. This charge never was a popular one with 
the Pullman Company, because it drove patronage from their service, 
so it immediately and has since complied with the provisions of the act. 



12 N. C. COEPOKATION COMMISSION 

The railroads appealed to tlie Interstate Commerce Commission for 
relief, and a hearing was had in Raleigh, and upon motion of the 
Corporation Commission the ease was consolidated with one which took 
the nature of a general investigation into the reasonableness and lawful- 
ness of the surcharge in general. The case was argued November 24, 
1924, and is now being considered by the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission. 

Under Ex Parte 74, in 1920, the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
in the intrastate passenger fare discrimination cases, made orders estab- 
lishing the Pullman surcharge in nine states where the intrastate appli- 
cation of the surcharge was either prohibited by statute or prevented 
by commission orders. Later North Carolina, South Carolina, West 
Virginia and Virginia passed statutes or made orders forbidding such 
surcharge. The carriers appear to have followed a different course of 
procedure in each of the four states. So far as we are advised, the order 
in West Virginia has been observed, but a discrimination proceeding was 
instituted before the Interstate Commerce Commission and is still pend- 
ing. In South Carolina, the carriers procured a temporary injunction 
in the United States Court, and in Virginia an appeal was taken, which 
is still pending. 

With respect to interstate freight rate adjustments, the following pro- 
ceedings have been had during the period covered by this report: 

WATER AND RAIL RATES THROUGH WILMINGTON 

Formal complaint has been prosecuted before the Interstate Commerce 
Commission against the Clyde Line Steamship Company and the rail 
carriers in this State to require establishment of joint through rates, 
water and rail, through Wilmington. This proceeding was instituted 
upon request of the Ship and Waterways Commission. Decision in this 
proceeding is pending. 

RATES ON BITUMINOUS COAL 

Upon complaint of chambers of commerce as to the* unreasonableness 
of coal rate adjustment to points in this State, our rate department 
undertook a complete check of coal rates to all points in the South from 
their nearest mines, and this digest, when completed, demonstrated that 
our rates on bituminous coal are on a higher average level than the 
average level of rates to destination points in other southern states, and, 
based upon this analysis, we now have pending a formal complaint before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission involving rates on coal to all 
points in this State, and we have every reason to expect a substantial 
reduction in these rates. Rates on coal to points in this State have been 
contested in former cases by industries and users in this State, without 
substantial relief, but as we now view the matter, such former proceed- 
ings were not based upon investigations sufficiently comprehensive or 
convincing of discrimination. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 13 

The Commission is also participating in a general investigation of 
rates on anthracite coal from Pennsylvania mines. Evidence in behalf 
of points in this State was offered before an Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission examiner in New York City in 1923, and the case is still pending. 
To North Carolina consumers the importance of anthracite rates is rela- 
tively small when compared to that of bituminous coal, but the present 
combination rates on anthracite are deemed to be excessive. 

SOUTHEASTERN RATE INVESTIGATION 

The Southeastern rate case, involving a general and comprehensive 
readjustment of interstate rates, which has been under way now for 
nearly three years, is nearing its final stages, and final disposition of it 
may be anticipated within the next three or four months. The Corpo- 
ration Commission has followed closely every stage of this proceeding 
from its first inception, and every reasonable effort has been made to 
protect the interests of North Carolina shippers involved in it. The 
tentative recommendations in this case provide an adjustment of inter- 
state rates to points in this State which upon an average of the whole 
is substantially the present average level. Yery substantial reductions 
will be made in interstate rates to all points in Western North Carolina. 
These reductions are entirely just, as points in Western North Carolina 
have always paid rates relatively much higher and in many cases 
actually higher for much shorter distances than points in Central and 
Eastern North Carolina. We are prosecuting exceptions to the rates 
proposed for Central and Eastern North Carolina points. 

VIRGINIA COMPLAINT AGAINST INTRASTATE RATES 

The Corporation Commission of Yirginia, representing the Yirginia 
cities, has brought into issue before the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion the whole adjustment of intrastate rates in this State, upon allega- 
tion that the lower level of these rates than the level of interstate rates 
from Yirginia into North Carolina constitutes a discrimination against 
them. This is one of the most important issues to the shippers in this 
State we have had to meet, and we are making preparations for it in a 
degree of thoroughness which its importance demands. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES 

The American Railway Express and the Southern Express Companies 
operate in North Carolina, the former over 3,075 miles of road, and 
the latter over 1,497 miles. These are service companies operating on 
the several railroads on an agreement or contract basis. Except in a 
few instances where it operates on a percentage basis, the American 
serves its carriers on a so-called uniform contract, which provides for 
payment to the carriers of the gross express earnings in certain desig- 



14 N. C. COBPOKATION COMMISSION 

nated groups, after making certain deductions for operating expenses, 
taxes, etc., in such groups. The Southeastern operates on contract with 
the carriers on a percentage basis. 

For the past two years, the Commission has participated in a general 
express rates case, Docket No. 13930, Interstate Commerce Commission. 
The carriers' application for increase in express rates was denied 
June 8, 1924, and an order made prescribing a revision of class rates 
and consolidating certain zones. A supplemental order of November 22, 
1924, postponed the effective date to March 1, 1925. 

The rail carriers of the West and South, over whose lines the Ameri- 
can Railway Express operates, have filed a bill in equity seeking to 
enjoin that company from complying with the rate revision order so 
far as it prescribes reduced rates in present Zones 2 to 5, both inclusive, 
and to set aside so much of said order only as requires such reductions. 

The Southeastern Company will comply with the order, we are ad- 
vised. It is not made a party defendant and the lines over which it 
operates have not joined in the action. 

TELEGKAPH COMPANIES 

The Postal and the Western Union Telegraph Companies operate in 
this State. 

The Western Union operates 466 offices, of which seventy-five are 
offices independent of railroad connections, with 4,222 miles of toll line 
and eighteen miles of cable line. This mileage includes property owned, 
property leased, and jointly owned lines. 

The Postal operates thirty-six offices in the larger cities of the State. 

ELECTRIC POWER 

This continues to be one of the State's greatest developments. This 
industry continues to extend its operations until we probably have in 
excess of two thousand miles of high-power transmission lines. Since 
our last report provision has been made for increasing the investment 
more than ten million dollars, and it is very little more than able to keep 
pace with the demand. 

The cities and towns of the State have found that, with available 
power for industrial purposes, it is possible for them to invite industrial 
enterprises within their limits that would otherwise be impossible. This 
fact makes additional investment in these utilities attractive and there 
are several propositions now under consideration for extensive addi- 
tional development. Because of the State's general industrial develop- 
ment being so dependent upon the adequate development of this industry, 
we have striven to make it as easy for our utilities to obtain money for 
investment in additional facilities and extensions as utilities in other 
jurisdictions. 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 15 

There are more than 250 cities, towns and villages with electric light 
service and a census of 120 of these shows 101,303 customers, of which 
approximately one-fifth are industrial and four-fifths residential cus- 
tomers. Therefore, basing the using population upon the U. S. census 
average family of five, it is 500,000, and probably exceeds this amount 
sufficiently to equal one-fifth of the State's population. 

GAS COMPANIES 

The adoption on January 1, 1921, of the Commission's Standard Rules 
and Regulations has practically eliminated gas service complaints. 
Extensive street improvement in the several cities has required advanced 
investments on which these utilities get small, if any, immediate returns. 
Extensions of gas mains are often made in thinly settled suburbs, where 
the income from gas sales barely justifies the additional expenses, but 
generally such utilities were in such condition that in April of this year 
the Commission made a general gas rate reduction which affected all gas 
utilities. This was done in consideration of reduced prices of gas-pro- 
ducing fuels. 

STREET RAILWAYS 

The increasing competition with automobiles and auto bus traffic 
makes it exceedingly difficult for street railway utilities to provide 
equipment and operating expenses and meet the statute requirement of 
their part of street improvement in the several cities. 

TELEPHONE COMPANIES 

In 1922 there were operating in the State 222 telephone companies, 
operating 345 exchanges, with 122,992 stations. The six large com- 
panies, viz., the Southern Bell, the Home, the Piedmont, the Carolina, 
the North State and the Interstate, had a total investment of $8,808,- 
685.07, operating 81 exchanges. 

In 1923 there were 210 companies operating 364 exchanges, with 
127,260 stations. The six large companies named above report total 
investment for 1923 of $10,704,301.30, operating 88 exchanges. 

The above named companies operate exchanges in our larger cities and 
towns and serve the great majority of the State telephone users. The 
other companies are small, often serving only one community, and 
several are mutual companies formed especially for the convenience of 
the stockholders and are operated without any pecuniary consideration 
except for maintenance; 129 of these companies are interconnecting for 
long-distance service, which on January 1, 1924, connected 294 ex- 
changes with 115,000 telephones. 

There is an arrangement by which the subscribers of 117 of these 
telephone companies on 294 exchanges have a charge account with the 
"Western Union Telegraph Company for telegraph service. 



16 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



DEPARTMENT OF BANKS 



On October 10, 1924, there were under our supervision 527 banks, 
including 64 branches, with resources of $288,379,564.91, an increase 
of $33,790,747.84 since September 15, 1922, the date of our last report. 

During the year 1923 the Department made seven hundred and eleven 
examinations, which included one examination for all banks and one 
hundred and ninety more than once. In 1924 six hundred and fifty 
examinations were made, which included all banks of deposit once and 
eighty-nine more than once. 

Nine banks were established in 1923 and seven in 1924. 

One branch bank was established in 1923 and nine in 1924. 

Seven banks were consolidated in 1923, and thirteen in 1924. Three 
temporarily suspended business in 1923, and after satisfactory read- 
justment of liabilities were reopened. 

Fifteen banks were closed in 1923 and nine in 1924. 

INDUSTRIAL BANKS 

In 1923 there were 17 industrial banks with resources of $5,081,659.96, 
and in 1924 there are 21, with resources of $7,454,967.04, an increase 
of $2,373,308.08 in one year. 

Generally speaking the banking condition is better than at any time 
since the war. The casualties caused by the reconstruction period have 
practically all been eliminated from the system, either by closing or 
consolidation, and the Commission's authority under the Banking Act of 
1921 to prevent opening banks with small capital in communities with 
small financial backing is expected to prevent repetition of the condition 
which prevailed for two or three years preceding the period of this report. 

Eespectfully, 

"W. T. Lee, Chairman, 

Geo. P. Pell, Commissioner, 

A. J. Maxwell, Commissioner. 



Worth Carolina State Libraiy 
Raleigh 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 



IN RE APPLICATION OF S. STERNBERG FOR PERMISSION TO ABAN- 
DON THE ASHEVILLE AND EAST TENNESSEE RAILROAD COMPANY 
AS A PUBLIC UTILITY AND TO DISMANTLE AND USE FOR OTHER 
PURPOSES THE PROPERTY OF SAID COMPANY. 

Order 

This cause coming on to be heard, upon the petition of S. Sternberg, and 
it appearing that the Asheville and East Tennessee Railroad Company has 
for a number of years been operating at a great financial loss, and that his 
Honor, Henry P. Lane, judge presiding, 19th Judicial District, has confirmed 
the sale of the property of said railroad company, by a receiver, to the said 
S. Sternberg, and it further appearing that it would be unreasonable and 
unjust for the Commission to require the operation of said railroad by the 
petitioner, as a public utility, 

It is Therefore Ordered, Upon motion of Sale & Pennell, attorneys for the 
petitioner, that said petitioner be and is hereby authorized to discontinue the 
operation of said railroad. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

January 12, 1923. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE HOLLISTER LUMBER COMPANY'S APPLI- 
CATION TO AMEND LICENSE TO BECOME LIMITED COMMON CAR- 
RIER. 

Order 

Under order of the North Carolina Corporation Commission, dated April 
26, 1920, the Hollister Lumber Company was authorized to transport over its 
logging road all kinds of commodities other than its own, including firewood, 
oak timber, oak lumber and railroad crossties, and to charge therefor reason- 
able rates which are contained in printed tariff on file with the Commission. 
The Hollister Lumber Company makes further petition to the Commission to 
amend the license granted in said order and enlarged so as to permit the said 
company to transport over its line between Hollister and Vaughan, besides the 
commodities heretofore included in its petition, manufactured lumber and 
dimension timber, except crossties : 

That the Hollister Lumber Company be allowed to charge therefor a basic 
rate of two dollars and fifty cents ($2.50) per thousand (1,000) feet, for dry 
pine lumber, with corresponding rate based upon weight for other manu- 
factured lumber and timber. Upon consideration of the above petition of 
the Hollister Lumber Company, it is 

Ordered, That the license of the Hollister Lumber Company heretofore 
granted to transport commodities other than its own, and to charge reasonable 

Part 1—2 



- ■ 

18 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

rates therefor, be and the same is hereby amended so as to permit the said 
company to transport commodities between Hollister and Vaughan, including 
lumber and dimension timber, except crossties. 

It is Further Ordered, That the said company be and the same is hereby 
authorized to apply basic rate of two dollars and fifty cents ($2.50) per thous- 
and (1,000) feet, for dry pine, with corresponding rate based upon weight 
for other manufactured lumber and timber, the said rate to be and remain 
in force until further ordered by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

January 22, 1923. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE BLACK MOUNTAIN 
TELEPHONE CORPORATION FOR INCREASE IN RATES. 

Order 

The Black Mountain Telephone Corporation, of Black Mountain, N. C, 
having first obtained and filed with the Corporation Commission the written 
consent of the board of aldermen of the town of Black Mountain to the in- 
crease requested, makes the application for authority to charge, in the town 
of Black Mountain and on its rural lines outside of the corporate limits of 
the said town, the following rates : 

$3.50 per month for business special phone. 
3.00 per month for business duplex phone. 
2.25 per month for residence special phone. 
2.00 per month for residence duplex phone. 
18.00 for nine months service, or less, payable in advance, as a rate for 
summer visitors and temporary residents, with one charge for 
installation. 
.25 per station for each additional mile or fraction thereof outside 
of the corporate limits of the town of Black Mountain. 

Therefore it is Ordered, That the rates requested in the said telephone 
corporation's petition are hereby granted to take effect March 1, 1923. 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 10th day of February, 1923. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE ASHEVILLE TELE- 
PHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY FOR AUTHORITY TO ESTAB- 
LISH FOUR-PARTY TELEPHONE SERVICE IN SEVERAL TOWNS IN 
WHICH IT OPERATES IN NORTH CAROLINA AND TO ESTABLISH 
A RATE THEREFOR. 

Order 

The Asheville Telephone and Telegraph Company having made application 
for the establishment of a four-party service in the several towns in which 
it maintains and operates an exchange, and the said Asheville Telephone and 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 19 

Telegraph Company requesting in the said application that a rate for this 
service be established at the same time the authority is granted by the Com- 
mission, it is therefore 

Oedered, That the petition of the Asheville Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany for the establishment of four-party service is hereby granted and the 
rate for such service in each town shall be as follows : 

Exchanges 1-Party 2-Party J^-Party 

Asheville .*. $3.00 $2.50 $2.00 

Canton 2.25 2.00 1.75 

Hendersonville 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Waynesville 2.00 1.50 1.50 

Ordered, That the rates requested in the said telephone corporation's peti- 
tion are hereby granted to take effect March 1, 1923. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 1st day of March, 1923. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL 
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY FOR AUTHORITY TO 
ESTABLISH FOUR-PARTY TELEPHONE SERVICE IN SEVERAL 
TOWNS IN WHICH IT OPERATES IN NORTH CAROLINA AND TO 
ESTABLISH A RATE THEREFOR. 

Order 

The Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company having made applica- 
tion for the establishment of a four-party service in the several towns in 
which it maintains and operates an exchange, and the said Southern Bell 
Telephone and Telegraph Company requesting in the said application that a 
rate for this service be established at the same time the authority is granted 
by the Commission, it is, therefore 

Ordered, That the petition of the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company for the establishment of four-party service is hereby granted and 
the rate for such service in each town shall be, as follows : 

Exchanges 1-Party 2-Party 4-Party 

Apex, N. C $2.25 $1.75 $1.50 

Burlington 2.75 2.25 1.75 

Graham 2.75 2.25 1.75 

Haw River 3.25 2.75 2.25 

Cary 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Charlotte 3.50 3.00 2.50 

Cleveland 2.25 2.00 1.75 

Davidson 2.25 2.00 1.75 

Fairmont 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Gibson 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Goldsboro 2.75 2.25 1.75 

Greensboro 3.25 2.75 2.25 

Hamlet ,.... 2.50 2,25 L75 

Laurinburg 2.25 2.00 1.75 

Lumberton 2.25 2.00 1.75 

Morganton 2.25 2.00 1.75 



20 N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 

Exchanges 1-Party 2-Party Jf-Party 

Mount Olive $2.25 $2.00 $1.75 

Murphy 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Raleigh 3.25 2.75 2.25 

Reidsville 2.50 2.25 1.75 

Rockingham 2.50 2.25 1.75 

Rowland 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Salisbury 2.75 2.25 2.00 

Selma 2.25 2.00 1.75 

Southport -. 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Wendell 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Wilmington 3.25 2.75 2.25 

Winston-Salem 3.25 2.75 2.25 

Wrightsville 2.75 2.25 2.00 

Wrightsville (seasonal) 5.25 5.25 5.00 

Zebulon 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Ordered, That the rates requested in the said telephone corporation's peti 
tion are hereby granted to take effect March 1, 1923. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 1st day of March, 1923. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF APPLICATION OF THE MORRIS TELEPHONE 
COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES IN THE TOWN 
OF HILLSBORO, N. C. 

Order 

This application by the Morris Telephone Company for the adjustment of 
telephone rates in the town of Hillsboro was heard Tuesday, March 13, 1923, 
and the petitioner was represented by Hon. L. M. Carlton and the respondent 
by Hon. S. M. Gattis. 

The petition had been under the consideration of the officials of the town of 
Hillsboro for several months. The city's franchise to the Morris Telephone 
Company had provided the rate which is now being charged and the city 
officials were agreed that the company is entitled to an increase over the 
present franchise rates. 

The exchange was established in 1905, with about twenty subscribers, when 
the town had a population of less than one thousand, since which time, the 
population has increased to more than two thousand and the number of tele- 
phones has been increased to one hundred seventeen. 

The petitioner avers that since the year 1915 telephone sets have increased 
from $8.93 to $16.95 on desk type, and from $10 to $18 on wall type; that 
wire has increased during the same period from $4.12 per mile to $9. and 
that poles have increased during the same period from $1 to from $3 to $5 
and that the expenses of the office have increased from $50 per month to 
$210, and ask that individual lines be increased from $2.50 to $3.50, and busi- 
ness party lines from $2.25 to $3.25 ; individual residence lines from $1.67 to 
$2.50 and party residence lines from $1.50 to $2.00, but the Commission cannot 
grant the total increases requested, because it would raise the cost of this 
service to a point considerably in excess of what it has granted on other 
exchanges of similar size : Therefore, it is 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 21 

Ordered, That the Morris Telephone Company is hereby authorized to 
charge for monthly telephone service in the town of Hillsboro, and on its 
exchange beyond the town limits, the following rates, effective April 1, 1923, 
until further ordered : 

Single line business phones $3.25 

Duplex business phones 2.75 

Single line residence phones 2.25 

Duplex residence phones 1.75 

Four-party line residence phones 1.50 

The rate on phones located outside the city limits shall be twenty-five cents 
($.25) on each class in addition to the above rate. 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This the 16th day of March, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE PETITION OF THE HENDERSON WATER COMPANY FOR 
APPROVAL OF SCHEDULE OF RATES BY THE NORTH CAROLINA 
CORPORATION COMMISSION. 

Order 

After full hearing of testimony and consideration of argument set out in 
brief, we find the following schedule of rates to be reasonable rates to be 
charged by the petitioner, the Henderson Water Company : 

Rates in Cents Per 100 Cu. Ft. Per Month. 

From 400 cu. ft. to 4,000 cu. ft 35 cents 

From 4,000 cu. ft. to 12,000 cu. ft. 30 cents 

From 12,000 cu. ft. to 20.000 cu. ft 22 cents 

Over 20,000 cu. ft 18 cents 

The schedule of rates now charged by the petitioner for hydrant service 
may be increased ten per cent. 

The foregoing schedule of rates may be charged applicable to meter read- 
ings for and after the month of April, 1923. 

The petition, except as and to the extent herein granted, is denied. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 29th day of March, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE THE APPLICATION OF THE HENDERSON WATER COMPANY 
TO HAVE A SCHEDULE OF RATES ESTABLISHED. 

Supplemental Order 

In addition to the rates established by the order of this Commission on 
March 29, 1923, the petitioner is authorized to charge the following maximum 
rates for service rendered by it: 

For pressure on automatic sprinklers where the company furnishes 
the only source of supply, $44 per annum per ten thousand square feet 
of floor space, payable monthly, with a minimum charge for ten thousand 
square feet of floor space. 



I N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

For pressure on automatic sprinklers where this company furnishes 
one source of supply, $22 per annum per ten thousand square feet of floor 
space, payable monthly, with a minimum charge for ten thousand square 
feet of floor space. 

For IVz" inside fire hose connection, $12 each per annum, payable 
monthly. 

For each 2 y 2 " double nozzle Henderson Standard Fire Hydrant for fire 
protection, an increase of ten per cent, payable monthly, over and above 
those charged prior to March 29, 1923. 

All of the foregoing fire protection service to be supplied only upon 
execution by the applicant of the company's Standard Private Fire Pro- 
tection Agreement on file with this Commission. 

The company is authorized to charge twenty-five cents (.$.25) per month 
for each month any bill remains unpaid to cover the cost of collection. 

The company is authorized to charge fifty cents ($.50) per month for 
discontinuing service at the street for nonpayment of bills. 

The above charges to be effective from April 1, 1923 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 9th day of April, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE APPLICATION OF HENDERSON WATER COMPANY FOR 
ESTABLISHMENT OF RATE SCHEDULE. 

Order Overruling Exceptions of City of Henderson 

Exceptions have been filed by the city of Henderson to the orders of the 
Corporation Commission in the above-named case, said exceptions having been 
considered by the Commission, and it appearing that the questions raised in 
the said exceptions were considered by the Commission previous to the issuing 
of orders in the case : It is therefore 

Ordered, That the exceptions to the orders of the Commission in the above 
case, filed by the city of Henderson, be and the same are hereby overruled. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This the 18th day of April, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE APPLICATION OF THE HENDERSON WATER COMPANY TO 
HAVE A SCHEDULE OF RATES ESTABLISHED. 

Order 
The Commission having further considered this application, the Henderson 
Water Company is hereby ordered to reduce the number of cubic feet per 
block, and to put into effect for bills rendered for service from and after the 
month of July, 1923, subject to complaint and hearing after the expiration 
of six months as follows : 

Monthly Rates in, Cents per 100 Cu. Ft. 

From 400 cu. ft. to 4,000 cu. ft at $0.35 

Next 4,000 cu. ft at .30 

Next 4,000 cu. ft at .25 

After 12,000 cu. ft _ at .18 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 23 

Minimum Quantities for the Following Size Service May Be 
Charged Monthly: 

For y 2 in. service for which 400 cu. ft. may be used $1.40 

For % in. service for which 500 cu. ft. may be used 1.75 

For 1 in. service for which 600 cu. ft may be used 2.10 

For 2 in. service for which 12.000 cu. ft. may be used 4.20 

The Following Service Charges are Authorized: 

For each month any bill remains unpaid, to cover cost of 

collection $0.25 

For turning water off for nonpayment 50 

The Following Charges for Fire Hose Connections, Hydrants and 
Sprinkler Service are Hereoy Authorized Upon Execution or 
Special Contracts at the Following Rates, Fayaole Monthly: 

For 1 to iy 2 inch hose connection $1.00 

For standard fire hydrants 3.67 

For automatic sprinklers, one source of supply per 10,000 

sq. ft 3.67 

For automatic sprinklers, two sources of supply per 10,000 

sq. ft 1.83 

For community hydrants, payable annually in advance 44.00 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 27th day of July, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE APPLICATION OF THE HENDERSON WATER COMPANY TO 
HAVE A SCHEDULE OF RATES ESTABLISHED. 

Order 

The exceptions of the attorneys for the city of Henderson to the Commis- 
sion's order of July 27, 1923, in the above-named case, have been considered 
by the Commission, and it is 

Ordered, That the exceptions as set forth therein are hereby overruled. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 3d day of August, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE UNION PASSENGER STATION FOR PLYMOUTH, 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Under order of April 11, 1922, the following findings were made with respect 
to passenger depot accommodations at Plymouth : 

"The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company has to construct a freight 
depot and either a passenger depot of its own or to unite with the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad in the joint construction of a union passenger station. The 
combination station of the Norfolk Southern Railroad is inadequate for the 
combination purposes of freight and passenger station, and its location makes 
necessary a head-in and back-out, or back-in and head-out movement of all 
passenger trains at this point. A convenient location is accessible between 
the tracks of these two companies near the intersection of the tracks on 



24 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

Washington Street, and it would seem to be advantageous to the traveling 
public and, under the circumstances, to impose no unreasonable hardship or 
expenditure upon these companies to provide this joint facility." 

In compliance with order made at that time, the Norfolk Southern Railroad 
Company submitted plans for a union passenger station at Plymouth and the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, while protesting that a union pas- 
senger station should not be required, approved the plans submitted by the 
Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

The original order of the Commission indicated that the proposed station 
was to be constructed "on either side of Washington Street, as they may 
agree upon, between the tracks of the Atlantic Coast Line and Norfolk 
Southern Railroads." The Atlantic Coast Line insists that the depot, if con- 
structed, should be located at the junction of the tracks of the two companies 
which is some distance west of the Washington Street location. Washington 
Street is the main street running through the center of the town, and a depot 
fronting on this street would be much more convenient and accessible, and a 
convenient location fronting on this street between the tracks of these com- 
panies will furnish a more convenient and accessible location convenient to 
the trains of either line and without material expense, if any, of rearrange- 
ment of tracks. The plans submitted for this depot by the Norfolk Southern 
Railroad Company under date of May 11, 1922, are approved, and it is 

Okdered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Company unite in the joint construction of depot in accord- 
ance with the said plans, and that the same be located on the east side of 
Washington Street between the tracks of the Atlantic Coast Line and Norfolk 
Southern Railroads, and that the said depot be completed within six months 
from this date. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This the 30th day of March, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE UNION PASSENGER STATION FOR PLYMOUTH, 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Exceptions having been filed by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company 
to the order of the Commission of the thirtieth day of March, 1923, requiring 
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and the Norfolk Southern Railroad 
Company to unite in the joint construction of passenger depot at Plymouth, 
and argument having been heard and consideration given to the said excep- 
tions of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, the said exceptions num- 
bered one to twelve, inclusive, and fourteen to nineteen, inclusive, are deemed 
to be without merit and are overruled. 

Paragraph numbered thirteen excepts to the said order for that "the order 
makes no provision for the apportionment between the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad Company and the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, as it should, 
of the costs of construction and operation of the proposed union station." 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 25 

Such apportionment was not made in the order of the Commission for that it 
has been the custom in similar matters for railroad companies to agree between 
them as to apportionment of expense of construction and operation. If such 
agreement with respect to construction and operation of the union passenger 
station at Plymouth is not made and the Commission advised within thirty- 
days from this date, an amendment to the order of March 30, 1923, will be 
made covering the exception. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 22d day of June, 1923. Clerk. 






i 



CHARLOTTE FISH AND OYSTER COMPANY v. AMERICAN RAILWAY 
EXPRESS COMPANY AND SOUTHEASTERN EXPRESS COMPANY. 

Order 

This complaint of the Charlotte Fish and Oyster Company alleges that the 
charges made and collected by the above named express companies for making 
returns on paid c.o.d. shipments are excessive and unreasonable. The following 
are the charges complained of: 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to $5.00 and under 30c. 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to over $5.00 and not over $10.00 33c. 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to over 10.00 and not over 20.00 35c. 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to over 20.00 and not over 30.00 37c. 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to over 30.00 and not over 40.00 40c. 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to over 40.00 and not over 50.00 43c. 

The following are the charges which the complainant seeks to have estab- 
lished : 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to $10.00 and under 15c. 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to 30.00 and over $10.00.... 20c. 

Paid c.o.d.'s amounting to 50.00 and over 30.00.... 25c. 

Further . complaint is made that although complainant has printed instruc- 
tions on its shipping tags, reading as follows : "Express Agent — If unclaimed 
or refused sell full charges ; if can't sell, wire us collect for instructions." It 
is alleged by complainant that these instructions are not being complied with 
by express agents and they seek to have the express companies instruct their 
agents to follow said instructions. 

Complainant relies largely upon the fact that banks make collections on 
drafts, etc., at very muich lower rates than those charged by the express 
companies for collecting and remitting for paid c.o.d.'s and point out that the 
charges for this class of express service have been lowered in South Carolina. 
Defendants contend that the charges complained of are not unreasonable or 
excessive considering the class of service performed by their companies in 
the collection of money on paid c.o.d. shipments and contend that there is 
no reasonable comparison which may be drawn between the service per- 
formed by their companies and that performed by banks in collecting and 
making returns on drafts, etc. The defendants state that it is their practice, 
through their agents, not only to undertake delivery of the goods and collect 



26 K. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

therefor one time as in the case of banks but that they make repeated efforts 
to accomplish delivery and make these collections on c.o.d. shipments of fish. 
They draw a comparison between this class of shipments and shipments which 
are not made c.o.d., in that on the latter a very large percentage are delivered 
at the first effort ; while, on the former, it is frequently necessary to make 
repeated efforts before delivery is accomplished. 

The express companies file as evidence copies of the various blanks used 
by their agents and accounting departments which they state are absolutely 
necessary to be used in the conduct of the c.o.d., system under which they 
operate for the protection of shippers, receivers, and their companies, respec- 
tively. The charges complained of are uniform throughout the country except 
in the State of South Carolina. 

The express companies do not contend that reasonable rules for having 
agents notify shippers before making sale of fish for charges would be objec- 
tionable. Upon the record, the Commission finds that in view of the services 
performed and which are necessary for the protection of both shippers and 
receivers of express shipments of fish, the charges complained of are not 
unreasonable. In the opinion of the Commission, there should be established 
a uniform rule for the protection of shippers and the guidance of express 
agents in the matter of giving notice to shippers before fish shipments are 
sold for charges ; it is, therefore, 

Ordered, That the feature of the complaint alleging excessive and unreason- 
able charges on paid c.o.d. returns be and the same is hereby dismissed. It 
is further 

Ordered, That the following rules be and the same are hereby put in force 
and effect by this Commission : 

All express companies operating in this State and which hold themselves 
out as carriers of fresh fish, shall give notice to the consignor of the 
failure or refusal of the consignee to receive such shipments when the 
same have remained on hand four hours during daylight after arriving 
at point of destination, said notice to be given by filing a telegram to 
that effect with a telegraph company doing a commercial telegraph 
business between points of origin and destination ; provided, that it shall 
not be necessary to give such notice unless the carrier is directed by the 
shipper so to do in writing or printing attached to the package. 

This shall not apply where there is no commercial telegraph office open 
for business at either initial or destination point at the expiration of the 
time fixed herein. 

Should the carrier sell such shipments on the order of the shipper in 
any manner not pointed out by law, it shall be entitled to a commission 
for such services of ten per cent of the amount realized. 

The carrier shall not await answer to its said telegram to the shipper 
longer than two hours, after which time it shall act in reference to said 
shipments in accordance with its duty under the law. 

Should the said shipment perish or become damaged because of the 
carrier's observance of the requirements of this order, it shall not be 
liable in damages therefor, if not otherwise at fault. 

The carrier shall re-ice such shipments only when directed to do so by 
the shipper, and when it is practicable so to do ; and when shipments are 
re-iced, same shall be done at actual cost and at the expense of the 
shipper. 

The shipper shall pay the going and return charges on shipments which 
are returned under this order, together with the telegraph tolls. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 5th day of April, 1923. Clerk. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 27 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE BURNSVILLE ELECTRIC 
COMPANY FOR RATE FOR LARGE POWER USERS. 

Order 

The petitioner in this case filed application and, in due course, hearing was 
held on March 9, 1923. The Carolina Feldspar Company, Inc., the only con- 
sumer of the petitioner affected by the rate in contemplation was represented. 

The rate hereinafter promulgated is in addition to the rate already author- 
ized by this Commission for the petitioner : Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the Burnsville Electric Company is hereby authorized to 
charge miscellaneous consumers with a two hundred horsepower demand and 
over, from and after the next meter reading date following the date of this 
order, as follows : 

$1.50 per contract h.p. each month, which $1.50 entitles the consumer 
to use during such month 25 k.w.h. 

Four cents per k.w.h. for the next 2.000 k.w.h. used per month. 

Two cents per k.w.h. for the next 4,000 k.w.h used per month. 

One and one-half cents per k.w.h. for the excess of the above stated 
amounts. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of April, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE APPLICATION SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF FOUR-PARTY LINE SEASONAL 
TELEPHONE RATES IN WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH. 

Order 

The Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company in this petition is 
asking the Commission for authority to abandon the two-party line annual 
seasonal residential service, and to establish a monthly seasonal rate of 
$4.25 for four-party residential seasonal service for a period of three months, 
payable in advance : Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the petitioner is hereby authorized to inaugurate four-party 
line seasonal service at Wrights ville Beach and to charge therefor the sum 
of $12.75 for a three months period, payable in advance, and to abandon the 
present two-party line annual and seasonal residential service: Provided, 
that where subscribers desire phone service for a period of more than three 
months, but not for two periods of three months each, then the petitioner 
shall bill such subscribers for each month in excess of the three months 
period at one-third of the rate hereinbefore mentioned, or $4.25 per month. 

By order of the Commission : R. o. Self, 

This 13th day of April, 1923. Clerk. 



28 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



IN RE PETITION OF THE THOMASVILLE TELEPHONE COMPANY FOR 
INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES. 

Order 

The Thomasville Telephone Company, operating a telephone exchange in 
the town of Thomasville, North Carolina, makes application to the Commission 
for an increase of 75 cents each on special line business telephones, 50 cents 
each on duplex line business telephones, and 25 cents each on special line 
residence telephones. 

The financial statement of the company shows that during the year closing 
December 31, 1922, it had a deficit of $1,196.58. The company has 96 special 
line business, 13 two-party business, and 126 special line residence telephones. 
The increase asked for will give the company $110 per month in addition to 
its present revenue on its present number of telephones. 

The town officials and other leading business men approve the increase 
asked for by signing a petition filed with the application. 

The petitioner has installed a very expensive automatic central office equip- 
ment, and for the purpose of improving the service has incurred some indebt- 
edness which has increased the capital investment : Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the Thomasville Telephone Company is authorized to charge 
for monthly telephone rental service in the town of Thomasville the following 
rates, effective May 1, 1923 : 

Business telephones, special line $3.75 

Business telephones, duplex line 3.00 

Residence telephones, special line 2.25 

Residence telephones, four-party line 1.50 

All the above business and residence rates for regular 
service in suburbs outside exchange area of one mile radius 
are to be 25 cents higher for party lines and 50 cents higher 
for special lines. 

Desk telephone sets, additional $0.25 

Extension sets (desk or wall type), residence 50 

Extension sets (desk or wall type), business 75 

Extension sets with calling device attached, extra 25 

Extension bells 25 

Extra User.... 50 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 24th day of April, 1923. Clerk. 



APPLICATION OF THE ROWLAND LUMBER COMPANY 
Petition For License to Carry Freight and Charge Therefor 

In the above entitled matter, upon application of the Rowland Lumber Com- 
pany, dated May 14, 1923, it appearing to the Commission that the Rowland 
Lumber Company is a corporation engaged in the business of manufacturing 
logs into sawed lumber and that the said Rowland Lumber Company has 
built a logging road, running between Kenansville and Chinquapin in Duplin 
County, connecting with the Atlantic and Carolina Railroad at Kenansville, 
and it further appearing that the said Rowland Lumber Company is desirous 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 29 

of transporting freight over its logging road for the accommodation of patrons, 
and having applied to the Commission under its petition in accordance with 
provisions of Chapter 160, of the Acts of the General Assembly of 1911, and 
subsequent amendatory acts, for license to haul freight over said logging 
road and to charge therefor reasonable rates, to be approved by this Commis- 
sion : Now it is therefore 

Ordered by the Corporation Commission, That the said Rowland Lumber 
Company be and it is hereby authorized to transport over and upon its said 
logging road all kinds of commodities, except logs, and sawed lumber will 
only be handled from points between Northeast River and Kenansville, and 
to charge therefor rates in accordance with tariff on file with this Commis- 
sion which has been approved reading as follows : 

"Supplement No. 1 

"To Rowland Lumber Company's Logging Railroad: 

Local Freight Tariff No. 2 
N. C. C. C. No. 2 

"All commodities, but not including forest products, except sawed lumber, 
and this only from points between the Northeast River and Kenansville, will 
be handled in carload lots minimum ten (10) tons, maximum twenty-five (25) 
tons, at rates per ton and per car as follows : 

Carload Rates Between Kenansville, N. C, and Chinquapin, N. C. 
"Sawed lumber, brick, flour, sand and gravel at following car rates : 

Five (5) miles and under.... $10.00 per car 

Ten (10) miles and over five (5) 15.00 per car 

Fifteen (15) miles and over ten (10) 20.00 per car 



"Other Commodities will be handled at $2.00 per ton — minimum ten (10) 
tons — excess in proportion. 



"Issued by A. R. Turnbull, President and General Manager, May 17, 1923. 

'"Effective May 21, 1923. 

"Rate on lumber does not apply beyond Northeast River." 

Which rates are subject to such changes and modifications as may from 
time to time be made or approved by this Commission. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

June 6, 1923. Clerk. 



GOLDSBORO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT, v. 
WILMINGTON, BRUNSWICK AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 

This complaint, made by the Goldsboro Chamber of Commerce on behalf of 
the Enterprise-Whiteville Lumber Company, and C. W. Petty, of Clinton, N. C, 
manufacturers of lumber and patrons of the Wilmington, Brunswick and 
Southern Railroad Company, alleges that the rate charged by the Wilmington, 



30 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Brunswick and Southern Railroad Company on lumber, carload, from Bolivia, 
N. C, to Navassa, N. C, both stations on the Wilmington, Brunswick and 
Southern Railroad Company, the latter being a junction point with the 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, is unreasonable. The present rate is $16 per 
car of 24,000 pounds, excess weight in proportion. This rate is published as 
a commodity rate and is higher than Class P rate by $2 per car, Class P rate 
being the general basis for rates on lumber as shown in North Carolina Excep- 
tion Sheet No. 5, published by the North Carolina Corporation Commission. 

The defendant makes reply that the commodity rate of $16 per car was 
made effective by order of a rate committee for the Southern lines during 
Federal control of the carriers, the Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern 
Railroad Company having at that time been under Federal control in a 
limited way. This commodity rate became effective November 16, 1919, being 
$14.50 per car, but was advanced under Ex Parte 74 of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, to $18 per car, until the general reduction in rates in July, 
1922, when the same became $16 per car, as at present. The defendant sub- 
mits financial statement of the operations of the Wilmington, Brunswick and 
Southern Railroad, which shows deficits for each year of its operation since 
1913, except for the years 1917-1918, during which they state the net revenue 
shown for those two years was due to a special movement of war material. 
The average deficit per year for the eight years operation was $3,104.72. 

Comparing the rate of $16 per car of 24.000 pounds, for the distances over 
the Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad Company from Bolivia to 
Navassa with the rates charged on lumber by other short lines in similar 
financial circumstances, we have for the Dover and Southbound Railroad a rate 
of $20.20; for the Kinston and Carolina Railroad and Atlantic and Western 
Railroad, $16.80 ; and for the slightly more prosperous short lines, viz., the 
Durham and Southern Railroad, $11.50 ; Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad and 
Laurinburg and Southern Railroad, $12. 

The Commission is of the opinion, and so finds, that upon the record sub- 
mitted the rate complained of has not been shown to be unreasonable, and 
it is therefore 

Ordered, That the complaint be and the same is hereby dismissed. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of June, 1923, Raleigh, N. C. Clerk. 



NORTH CAROLINA, BEFORE THE STATE CORPORATION COMMIS- 
SION—IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE CITIZENS OF 
LANSING FOR BETTER DEPOT AND STATION FACILITIES. 

Order 

This case is now heard, upon the exceptions of the Norfolk and Western 
Railway Company to the order of this Commission entered on the 28th day 
of November, 1922, and also upon an amended petition filed on behalf of the 
citizens of Lansing and the surrounding communities tributary thereto to 
the effect that the railway company be permitted to "discontinue Tuckerdale 
as a regular station, leaving for the use of its patrons at that point the 
present depot building, and providing, in the discretion of the Commission, a 
caretaker or commission agent for the convenience of patrons thereat," and 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 31 

this Commission having suggested to the railway company the propriety of 
accepting the proposal contained in the amended petition, and to maintain a 
commission agent at both Lansing and Tuckerdale, which proposal the rail- 
way company has indicated its willingness to comply with. 
It is Now Therefore Ordered : 

1. That the Norfolk and Western Railway Company shall erect and have 
ready for use before November 20, 1923, a station building commensurate 
with the demands of the growing community at Lansing, at or near the 
present site at which trains now stop. 

2. That when said station building shall have been erected at Lansing and 
-open for use of public as a commission agency, leave is hereby granted to 
the said railway company to abandon Tuckerdale as a regular agency station, 
but the railway company shall permit the present station building at Tucker- 
dale to remain as a place for storage for shippers receiving and delivering 
goods for transportation at that point, and all trains shall stop there as at 
present. 

3. That for the convenience of patrons, the railway company shall appoint 
suitable persons who shall act as commission agents to handle traffic at 
Tuckerdale and Lansing in the manner applicable to commission agencies as 
practiced by the railway company. 

4. In view of the above disposition of the matters in controversy, the Com- 
mission deems it unnecessary to further pass upon the exceptions filed by 
the Railway company as the order now entered composes all questions in 
controversy and is made in lieu of the order entered on the 28th day of 
November, 1922. 

June 14, 1923. R. O. Self, 

Cleric. 



IN RE LOCATION OF THE UNION PASSENGER STATION IN THE CITY 

OF WINSTON-SALEM. 

Modified Order 

By the Commission : On the 7th day of July, 1922, the Commission made an 
order in the above entitled cause. Since the making of such order the Com- 
mission has again reviewed the facts in the case and has deemed it wise to 
modify it : It is therefore 

Ordered, That said order of the 7th day of July, 1922, be modified by 
striking from it all that portion after the words "It is further ordered," down 
to the date-line of said order, and inserting in lieu thereof the words "that 
the petition be dismissed and the Wheeler Street site approved as the site for 
said union passenger station." It is the intent of this order to eliminate from 
the said order of July 7, 1922, the requirements for sheds and stoppage of 
trains thereat, leaving in effect without conditions the authority for the 
construction of the union passenger station by the Southern Railway Company, 
the Norfolk and Western Railway Company and the Winston-Salem South- 
bound Railroad Company on the Wheeler Street site. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 20th day of June, 1923. Clerk. 



32 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



IN THE MATTER OF PETITION OF PIEDMONT POWER AND LIGHT 
COMPANY FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF RATES IN THE TOWN 
OF GIBSONVILLE. N. C. 

Order 

The above entitled cause coming on to be heard and being heard, and it 
appearing to the Corporation Commission that the petitioner filed its petition 
in this cause on the 30th clay of January, 1923, and that thereafter the 
respondent, the town of Gibsonville, filed its answer herein on March 1, 1923, 
and that the petitioner and respondent both requested that evidence be heard 
by the Corporation Commission, and that it fix the rates to be charged the 
respondent by the petitioner for electric current furnished by the petitioner 
for lighting purposes in the town of Gibsonville : 

And it further appearing that during the pendency of said action that the 
petitioner and respondent have agreed upon the rates to be charged for the 
said service : It is therefore 

Ordered, That the schedule of rates for lighting purposes to be charged 
by the petitioner, Piedmont Power and Light Company, within the corporate 
limits of the town of Gibsonville, be and the same is hereby fixed as follows, 
to wit : 

First 50 k.w.h. at 10 cents per k.w.h. 

Next 500 k.w.h. at 8 cents per k.w.h. 

Next 500 k.w.h. at 7 cents per k.w.h. 

All over at 5 cents per k.w.h. 

Minimum charge, $1.20 

There shall be added to bills submitted, based upon the above rates, a 
penalty of 10 per cent if said bills are not paid on or before the 10th of 
each month for the services rendered for the preceding month. 

The above prescribed rates shall become effective as of June 20, 1923, 
and shall remain in full force and effect until otherwise ordered. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This the 5th day of July, 1923. Clerk. 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY v. ELIZABETH A. 

JONES AND OTHERS. 

Order 

This matter coming on to be heard upon the application of the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company for permission to condemn a right of way 
privilege and easement upon and over a certain lot of land in the city of 
Fayetteville, N. C, as described in the petition on file; and no objections 
being filed thereto by the defendants, or any one for them, after due notice 
given, and it appearing to the Commission that it is necessary to condemn 
such right of way privilege and easement in order that the petitioner may 
enlarge its terminal and yard facilities in and near Fayetteville, N. C, and 
for other railroad purposes : It is, therefore, on motion of Rose & Rose, 
attorneys for the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 33 

Ordered and Adjudged, That full permission and authority under Section 
1708 of the Consolidated Statutes, is granted to the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road Company to condemn the right of way privilege and easement over said 
lot described in its petition, and to prosecute to a conclusion the petition filed 
by it in the office of the clerk of the Superior Court of Cumberland County, 
North Carolina, copy of which was filed with the Commission. 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 27th day of July, 1923. Cleric. 



THE LAURINBURG OIL COMPANY v. SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY, 
WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY COMPANY, SOUTHERN 
RAILWAY, ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY. 

Order 

Upon the record submitted the complainant shipped from Laurinburg. N. C, 
to Lilesville, N. C, two cars of cottonseed meal as follows: Rock Island 
car No. 43890, bill of lading dated January 24, 1922, A. C. L. car No. 34999, 
bill of lading dated January 25, 1922, both cars consigned order Laurinburg 
Oil Company, notify W. M. Long. Shipments were refused by Mr. Long and 
complainant ordered cars forwarded to parties at Madison and Mount Airy, 
N. C, respectively. The Seaboard Air Line Railway Company was requested 
to apply the through rate on these shipments from Laurinburg to Madison and 
Mount Airy, but refused to do so upon the sole grounds that the cars having 
been delayed at Lilesville from January 26th and 31st, the respective dates 
of their arrival, until February 15th, the date on which reshipped, they were 
not entitled to the reconsigning privilege. The record shows that on the car 
destined to Madison complainant prepaid the freight, namely, $35 from 
Laurinburg to Lilesville, plus $70 Lilesville to Madison. On the car destined 
to Mount Airy complainant prepaid charges from Laurinburg to Lilesville, 
$52.50 ; from Lilesville to Mount Airy, $105. The cars were routed in the bill 
of lading from Lilesville to destination via Winston-Salem Southbound Rail- 
way, Southern Railway, Atlantic and Yadkin Railway. 

The reconsigning rules of the Seaboard Air Line Railway contain no limita- 
tion to the time within which reconsignment must take place; therefore, no 
good reason is apparent why the privilege should not be accorded these ship- 
ments : It is therefore 

Ordered, That the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, the Winston-Salem 
Southbound Railway, the Southern Railway, and Atlantic and Yadkin Rail- 
way be and they are hereby directed to apply on Rock Island car No. 43899 
and Atlantic Coast Line car No. 34999 a through rate from Laurinburg, N. O., 
to Madison and Mount Airy, N. C, respectively, of $3.88 per net ton, this 
being the legal rate on cottonseed meal, carload, on January 24 and 25, 1922, 
the dates of original movement from Laurinburg. In addition, the Seaboard 
Air Line is entitled to collect a charge of $6.50 per car for reconsigning. 
The overcharges to be refunded the Laurinburg Oil Company, Laurinburg, 
N. C, are as follows: On Rock Island car No. 43899, $20.90; and on Atlantic 
Coast Line car No. 34999, $34.50. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 3d day of August, 1923. Clerk. 

Part 1—3 



34 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RALEIGH GRANITE COMPANY v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 
COMPANY, MONTGOMERY LUMBER COMPANY RAILROAD. 

Order 

The Raleigh Granite Company alleges they own a granite quarry near Roles- 
ville, in Wake County, adapted for uses of building stone, curbing, paving 
blocks and crushed stone for concrete work ; that the only transportation line 
reaching this stone, which is one of the greatest natural exposures of granite 
in this section of the country, is the Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad, 
a standard-gauge line running out from Spring Hope a distance of approxi- 
mately 23 miles ; that the Raleigh Granite Company has built a connecting 
track from the said Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad at a point known 
as Barham's Siding to the stone quarry and has installed a crushing plant 
with a capacity of 10 cars daily ; that this was done primarily to get stone for 
the road building now in progress at Spring Hope, and that when the present 
contract is completed the crushing equipment, sidetrack, etc., will have to be 
removed and the quarry abandoned for lack of reasonable rates to points of 
consumption in North Carolina beyond Spring Hope reached by the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad, and request that such rates be established. 

The Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad is a limited common carrier 
under order of the Corporation Commission, dated March 21, 1916, the 
authority for which order is covered by Section 1039 of the Consolidated 
Statutes, which authorizes the Commission to grant such privileges to lumber 
railroads and the said Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad has been hand- 
ling freight, both carload and less, locally between Spring Hope and points 
on its line, and charging therefor rates shown in tariff filed with and approved 
by this Commission. The said Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad is able, 
willing, and anxious to continue handling this stone movement ; in fact, it 
is questionable whether a long continued operation of this line does not 
depend upon the future operation of this stone quarry. The Atlantic Coast 
Line Railroad Company declines to become a party to through rates on 
crushed stone upon the ground that the Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad 
is not, in their opinion, a chartered common carrier, and that all traffic inter- 
change with that line is billed locally to and from Spring Hope, and no joint 
through rates, or traffic arrangements are, or ever have been, in effect although 
the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company's equipment has been used by the 
Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad. The Corporation Commission is of 
the opinion, and so finds, that the Montgomery Lumber Company is in fact 
a common carrier for freight between points in North Carolina in so far as 
the traffic which it is permitted to handle under orders of the Corporation 
Commission is concerned : It is therefore 

Ordered, That the Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad and the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company be and are hereby directed to put in force 
within ten days from the date of this order rates on crushed stone, carload 
minimum 90 per cent marked capacity, except when cars are loaded to their 
visible capacity the actual weight will govern per ton 2,000 pounds from 
Barham's Siding, on the Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad to all 
stations on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad within the State, based upon the 
following scale of reasonable joint rates : 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 35 

25 miles and over 20 $86 

30 miles and over 25 ,. 90 

35 miles and over 30 , 93 

40 miles and over 35 96 

45 miles and over 40 100 

50 miles and over 45 103 

55 miles and over 50 , 106 

60 miles and over 55 109 

65 miles and over 60 , 113 

70 miles and over 65 116 

75 miles and over 70 , 119 

80 miles and over 75 122 

85 miles and over 80 125 

90 miles and over 85 129 

95 miles and over 90 132 

100 miles and over 95 135 

110 miles and over 100 135 

120 miles and over 110 136 

130 miles and over 120 , 139 

140 miles and over 130 142 

150 miles and over 140 145 

160 miles and over 150 147 

170 miles and over 160 149 

180 miles and over 170 '. 151 

190 miles and over 180 153 

200 miles and over 190 155 

210 miles and over 200 155 

If the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Montgomery Lumber Company 
Railroad are unable to agree to a division of the above joint mileage rates, 
the Corporation Commission will, upon application, give consideration to 
adjudicating the matter and issue order accordingly. 

It is not the intention of this order that it shall affect any change in the 
traffic relations now existing in the matter of rates and handling of freight 
between the Montgomery Lumber Railroad on the one hand and the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company on the other, except in the matter of rates and 
handling of crushed stone shipments from Barham's Siding to all points of 
destination on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad in North Carolina as provided 
for above. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 7th day of August, 1923. Clerk. 



RALEIGH GRANITE COMPANY v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 
COMPANY AND MONTGOMERY LUMBER COMPANY'S RAILROAD. 

Order Overruling Exceptions 

This cause coming up on the exceptions of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
Company to the order of this Commission, dated August 7, 1923, in the above 
entitled cause: It is now 

Ordered, That said exceptions be overruled. 

By order of the Commission: R. O. Self, 

This 21st day of August, 1923. Clerk. 



36 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

W. P. WHITAKER, JR., v. CAROLINA TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 

COMPANY. 

Order 

It appearing from the record in this informal proceeding that the com- 
plainant has made application to the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany for installation of telephone service, and it appearing to the Commission 
from the admitted facts of record that there is no proper reason why such 
service should not he furnished, 

It is Ordered, That the Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company install 
for the petitioner telephone connection and service in accordance with the 
application of the petitioner and the usual terms of service by the Carolina 
Telephone and Telegraph Service at the offices of the petitioner in Fayette- 
ville and Wilson, N. C. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 11th day of August, 1923. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF PETITION OF THE IREDELL TELEPHONE COM- 
PANY FOR INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES IN THE TOWN OF 
TAYLORSVILLE, N. C, AND ADJACENT RURAL COMMUNITIES. 

Order 

This petition being under consideration at hearing on September 17th, it 
was found that the petitioner asked for the following rates : 

Business, single line (plus 25 cents for desk set) $3.50 

Residence, single line (plus 25 cents for desk set) 3.00 

Residence, duplex 2.50 

Residence, four-party 2.00 

Drop on rural line, 8 phones per line 3.50 

The above proposed rate is an increase of $1 each per phone per month for 
each classification and is somewhat out of line from the general classification 
of rates usually granted by the Commission for this size exchange, but it is 
found that the telephone company has an investment in this exchange which 
somewhat exceeds many other exchanges of like size : Therefore it is 

Ordered, That, effective October 1, 1923, subject to complaint and hearing, 
the Iredell Telephone Company is authorized to charge in the town of Taylors- 
ville the following monthly telephone rates : 

Business, single line $3.50 

Residence, single line 2.75 

Residence, duplex 2.25 

* Residence, four-party 1.75 

Drop for rural subscriber owned line containing net in ex- 
cess of 8 phones per line 3.50 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 37 

As desk sets are more expensive, both in original cost and in upkeep, the 

petitioner is hereby authorized to place an additional charge of twenty-five 
cents per month for such equipment. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 22d day of September, 1923. Clerk. 



APPLICATION OF THE PIEDMONT TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN RATES IN THE TOWN OF MOUNT 
HOLLY. N. C. 

Order 

The application of the Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph Company for 
increase in rates in the town of Mount Holly with a resolution passed by the 
mayor and board of aldermen of the said town approving the said application 
and the rates set forth therein, which rates appear to be reasonable and in 
conformity with exchanges of similar size and class of service offered in 
this town : It is therefore 

Ordered, That the Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph Company is hereby 
authorized to make the following monthly rental charges for the following 
classes of service, effective upon the completion of the installation of a 
modern Magneto, Common Battery, Universal Telephone System, according 
to the resolution passed by the board of aldermen of said town of Mount 
Holly : 

Rates for Common Battery Service 

Individual one-party line business rate $4.00 

Duplex two-party line business rate 3.50 

Individual one-party line residence rate.... 2.50 

Duplex two-party line residence rate.... 2.00 

Harmonic four on line business rate 3.00 - 

Harmonic four on line residence rate 1.50 

Rates for Magneto Service 

Individual one-party line business rate $3.00 

Two-party line business rate 2.50 

Individual one-party line residence rate 2.00 

Two-party line residence rate.... 1.50 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 16th day of October, 1923. Clerk. 






APPLICATION OF THE PIEDMONT TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH 
COMPANY FOR INCREASE IN RATES IN THE TOWN OF KINGS 
MOUNTAIN, N. C. 

Order 

The application of the Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph Company for 
increase in rates in the town of Kings Mountain with a resolution passed by 
the mayor and board of aldermen of the said town approving the said applica- 






38 N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

tion and the rates set forth therein, which rates appear to be reasonable and 
in conformity with exchanges of similar size and class of service offered in 
this town : It is therefore 

Okdered, That the Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph Company is hereby 
authorized to make the following monthly rental charges for the following 
classes of service, effective on and after said emprovement in Magneto tele- 
phone service is made and Sunday service is established, according to the 
resolution passed by the board of aldermen of said town of Kings Mountain : 

Rates for Magneto Service 

Individual one-party line business rate $3.00 

Individual one-party line residence rate 2.00 

Two-party line business rate 2.50 

Two-party line residence rate.... 1.50 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 16th day of October, 1923. Clerk. 



NORTH CAROLINA TRAFFIC ASSOCIATION v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE 
RAILROAD COMPANY AND EAST CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY, 
WASHINGTON AND VANDEMERE RAILROAD COMPANY, VIRGINIA 
AND CAROLINA SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY, NORFOLK 
SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY AND KINSTON CAROLINA RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY, CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Order 

By the Commission : Complaints filed with the Commission against the 
above named railroads allege that by reason of ownership by the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company of stock and bonds of the East Carolina Rail- 
road Company, Washington and Vandemere Railroad Company, and Virginia 
and Carolina Southern Railroad Company, and of ownership by the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Company of stock and bonds of the Kinston Carolina Rail- 
road Company and of the Carolina Railroad Company, the short lines named, 
as a matter of construction of general rule one, adopted by the Corporation 
Commission, should apply the standard mileage freight tariff which has 
application over the lines of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company in 
the one case, and of the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company in the other. 

This is the single issue raised in these complaints, and is so stated in brief 
of complainant as follows : 

"The only question we submit to be determined by the Commission in 
the case at bar is, (1) whether or not the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
Company is in fact the owner of the Washington and Vandemere Rail- 
road, and (2) whether or not Rule 1, as enacted into law by the Commis- 
sion under its gwasi-legislative power and authority, should apply the 
same scale of freight rates as are in effect over the Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad as continuous mileage freight rates over the Washington and 
Vandemere Railroad." 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 39 

Precisely the same issue is stated with respect to each of the defendant 
subsidiary lines. 

If the Commission had confined its consideration to this one technical 
question, the complaints would have been promptly dismissed. 

Rule 1, as its number indicates, was the first general rule respecting freight 
rates, adopted by the Railroad Commission, predecessor of the Corporation 
Commission, many years ago, when the first general intrastate tariff was 
adopted. It reads as follows : 

"All connecting railroads which are under the management and control, 
by lease, ownership, or otherwise, of one and the same company, shall 
for the purposes of transportation, in applying this tariff, be considered 
as constituting but one and the same road, and the rates shall be com- 
puted as upon parts of one and the same road unless otherwise specified." 

This rule does not say that under all circumstances the standard tariff 
shall apply, but that it shall apply "unless otherwise specified." If "other- 
wise specified" as to a particular road, or piece of road, the general rule 
does not apply. It is too simple for argument that a general rule, carrying 
its own provision for exceptions, would not as a technical matter of construc- 
tion, have superior force to a specific exception to the general rule, made by 
approval of a different rate in a particular case. There has never been a time 
since the original adoption of rule one in 1891 when there have not been ap- 
proved exceptions to it in effect, and at times exceptions as to separate divi- 
sions of one and the same road. Rule 1 is a general rule which in express 
terms anticipates exceptions. Precisely this same question was presented to 
the Commission in the Black Mountain Railroad case. Corporation Commis- 
sion Report, 1915, p. 198. The Commission decided that where it had "other- 
wise specified" by approval of a different schedule of rates the general rule one 
was to that extent, and by its own permissive terms superseded. We see no 
ground upon which a different conclusion could be reached at this time upon 
the technical question presented. 

It has been held recently by the United States District Court for the North- 
ern District of Georgia in the case of Georgia, Southern and Florida Railway 
Company and Southern Railway Company v. Georgia Public Service Commis- 
sion, 289 Fed., page 878, that an order of the Railroad Commission of Georgia, 
based upon a construction of a general rule in almost exact terms of our 
general rule one, was invalid, and injunction against its enforcement granted, 
upon the ground that such general order could not lawfully be sustained 
upon a mere finding of ownership of stock and bonds of a subsidiary corpora- 
tion, and in its opinion in this case the court said : 

"It will be observed that the power of the Commission is confined to 
making rates which are" just and reasonable whether such rates be single 
rate or joint rates, and further that no different pow T er exists in said 
Public Service Commission in regard to making rates applicable to two 
or more railroads whether such railroads may be under the same or 
different control, except in so far as the unity of control may bear upon 
the question of the reasonableness of such rate." 

These complaints have been continued on our docket with the view of giv- 
ing them broader consideration than a mere technical construction of rule 



40 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

one, and for the purpose of scrutinizing the rates and charges of these lines 
and revising any such rates not found to be fully justified upon meritorious 
consideration. Numerous and important changes were made in the rates of 
some of these carriers during the period of government control — some by 
percentage advances and in some cases by arbitrary increases. 

East Carolina Railroad 

The East Carolina Railroad is a property in which the Atlantic Coast 
Line has never acquired any interest except the right to receive an annual 
rental and the right to come into possession of the property in 1929. This 
road was constructed by Henry Clark Rridgers and sold to the Atlantic Coast 
Line by conveyance of its shares of stock subject to a lease contract to 
himself to expire in 1929. Under the conditions of this sale, the Atlantic 
Coast Line has never had any control, or right of control, of the property or 
its management, It will acquire this right in 1929, when the lease, which 
was a precedent condition of its purchase of the stock, expires. The lessee 
is solely responsible for its obligations and would have to stand its losses, 
if any. Ry traffic arrangements with the Norfolk Southern, the East Carolina 
competes with the Coast Line in handling competitive interstate freight to 
Tarboro, which would not be permitted by the Coast Line, if that company 
controlled the policy of the East Carolina. 

It developed at the hearing that the cause which gave rise to complaint as 
to rates on the East Carolina Railroad related to its interstate rates. Prior to 
its operation under Federal control, the East Carolina had divisional arrange- 
ments with both the Coast Line and Norfolk Southern by which the inter- 
state rates to local points on its line north of Farmville were made the 
same as the interstate rates to Farmville, where the East Carolina crosses 
the Norfolk Southern, or the same as rates to Tarboro, where it connects 
with the Atlantic Coast Line. During the period of Government operation the 
interstate rates to these local stations were put upon a basis higher than to 
Farmville and Tarboro, which had the effect of putting distributing merchants 
located on the East Carolina at a distinct disadvantage as against their com- 
petitors at Farmville, Greenville. Tarboro and other competing points. It 
was this changed relationship which gave rise to complaint and resulted in 
the complaint before us. Soon after the return of the road to the lessor 
arrangement was again effected for restoring the interstate rates from north- 
ern and eastern territory to local stations on the East Carolina road to the 
former equal basis with rates to competing points. The Corporation Commis- 
sion has no control over interstate rates, but we have written assurance from 
interested carriers that interstate rates from the West will likewise be restored 
to the Farmville basis as soon as the general basis for western rates to this 
territory has been passed upon by the Interstate Commerce Commission in 
Docket 13494, now pending. This will complete the restoration of the former 
rate status, which gave to local stations on this road an equal opportunity 
on rates from the West, as they now again have on rates from the North and 
East, to meet competition of junction joints. 

Washington and Vandemere Railroad 

The Washington and Vandemere Railroad is owned by the Atlantic Coast 
Line through ownership of its stock. It is forty miles long ; was constructed 






DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 41 

in 1908. The census report shows 1,651 population in incorporated towns on 
its forty miles of road, outside of its connecting terminus at Washington. Its 
combined earnings for the fifteen years of its operation have been less than 
its combined operating expenses for the same period. The only shippers over 
this road who appeared at the hearing appeared in behalf of the railroad, 
and had no complaint to make of its rates. 

Interstate rates to local stations on its line are the same as to stations on 
the Coast Line proper. Intrastate rates between points on its line and Coast 
Line stations in this State are on the same mileage scale as applies between 
stations on the Coast Line and other system lines. Between the few local 
stations on its line the rate on some classes are slightly higher and on some 
classes slightly lower than the standard Coast Line mileage scale. The dif- 
ferences, which are not material, were made with relation to water competi- 
tion. No real benefit would result from conforming these rates to the main 
line scale, and on the contrary shippers on its line are asking that the present 
rate status be not disturbed. 

There is one feature of this local situation that has caused complaint in 
the past and with respect to which we have complaint at the present time. 
The entrance of both the Coast Line and the Washington and Vandemere 
into Washington is on the opposite side of the city from that of the Norfolk 
Southern, and there is no physical connection for interchange of freight 
between the Norfolk Southern on the one hand and the Coast Line and 
Washington and Vandemere on the other. The lines of the Norfolk Southern 
and Washington and Vandemere intersect at Porter Junction, three miles 
out of Washington, but the separate operation of the Washington and Vande- 
mere. and the absence of reasonable joint rates between it and the Norfolk 
Southern, does not give a reasonable basis for interchange of traffic between 
them. Joint mileage rates are now in effect between stations on the Washing- 
ton and Vandemere and other points within the State on traffic interchanged 
exclusively with the Atlantic Coast Line, but combination rates only are avail- 
able for traffic interchange with the Norfolk Southern. An order will be 
entered prescribing rates that are considered to be reasonable as joint rates 
between the Washington and Vandemere and the Norfolk Southern. 

Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad 

The Virginia and Carolina Southern was financed and built between 1907 
and 1910 by local businass men without financial assistance from any rail- 
road. It was built to give competition in service with existing carriers and 
to develop the local territory and has served this purpose. The stock of the 
company was afterwards sold to the Atlantic Coast Line, and transferred to 
a trustee for its benefit. It has continued to be operated by local officers 
under its original charter and corporate name. 

During the war period its lines were operated by the Government and its 
rates increased. Since the return of the property, there has been a general 
and very substantial reduction in all its rates. 

Practically all long-distance interstate rates to local stations on its lines 
are now the same as to the junction points. 

The local class rates have been reduced from twelve to thirty-one per cent, 
and are now about ten per cent higher than on the main lines of the Coast 
Line and on about the same level as local rates on the main lines of the 
Norfolk Southern. 



42 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Its former and present rates for distances of 10, 20, 30, and 40 miles are 
shown as follows : 





Miles 


Class Rates 


Aver- 
age 
Rates 


Per- 
centage 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


A 


B 


C 


D 


Re- 
duction 


Old rate 

Present rate_ 

Old rate 

Present rate. 

Old rate 

Present rate- 
Old rate 

Present rate. 


10 
10 

20 
20 

30 
30 

40 
40 


34 
24 

40$ 

33 

51$ 

42 

61$ 
48$ 


27| 

20$ 

33 

28 

40$ 
36 

47 
40 


25 
17 

30 
24$ 

361 
31 

40§ 

34 


19 
14$ 

22 
201 

28 
25 

33 

28 


17$ 
12$ 

19 
15$ 

22 
19 

25 
21$ 


15$ 

91 

17 
16$ 

171 
151 

19 
17 


121 

8 

14 

111 

151 
12$ 

171 
141 


141 
9$ 

15$ 
12$ 

17$ 
15$ 

201 
17 


141 
91 

15$ 
121 

17 
15$ 

17$ 
15$ 


111 

8 

121 
12$ 

14$ 

121 

15$ 

151 


19 
13 

22 
181 

26 
221 

29$ 
25 


31 
16 
14 
12 



Rates on important commodities originating on its lines, to important con- 
suming points, have been reduced since Federal control, in substantial 
amounts ranging from thirteen to forty per cent. These reductions apply to 
lumber, logs, cotton, tobacco and other products. 



KlNSTON AND CAROLINA RAILROAD AND CAROLINA RAILROAD 

The Kinston and Carolina Railroad, operating south of Kinston to Pink 
Hill and Beulaville, and the Carolina Railroad, from Kinston to Snow 
Hill, were constructed as logging roads to supply logs to sawmills at Kinston. 
The stock of these roads was purchased by the Norfolk Southern. 

The average net earnings of the Kinston and Carolina, from 1914 to 1921, 
inclusive, was $3,060 per annum, or 2.8 per cent on the tentative value of 
the property as found by the Interstate Commerce Commission as of 1914. 

The average net earnings of the Carolina Railroad, for the same period, 
was $3,440 per annum, or 1.9 per cent on the same basis of value. 

The Norfolk Southern itself is authorized to charge local rates higher than 
other system lines in the State, and it appears that the rates of these short 
lines are not higher than other short line roads, and only five per cent higher 
than the interstate mileage scale in effect over the system lines in this State 
between Virginia and North Carolina and between North and South Carolina 
points. 

For the evidence in this record we are compelled to conclude that neither 
of these subsidiary lines are earning a fair return on the investment in 
their properties, and some of the lines are sustaining a substantial loss by 
failing to earn the bare expenses of operation. If the general policy should 
be adopted that under no circumstances will a subsidiary or branch line be 
allowed to charge anything in excess of the standard rates of the system 
lines, which have the benefit of through traffic as well as local traffic, we not 
only could not expect any new lines to be built in the State, but we could 
expect further applications to be made to the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion for authority to abandon such branch lines as cannot be made, under 
such rates, to earn their expenses of operation, and thus become a burden 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 43 

upon the system. This is not a mere fanciful consideration, as there has 
been enough railroad mileage abandoned in the United States within the 
last five years to equal a line clear across the continent, and the Interstate 
Commerce Commission now has full authority to permit such discontinuance 
whenever a particular line becomes a burden on interstate lines. The expense 
of operation of branch lines has been increased by the standardized wages 
and rules, and the development of motor transportation is taking both freight 
and passenger business from them in greater proportion than from the longer 
system lines. 

With the readjustments that have been made in the rates of these lines 
since Government control, the intrastate local rates now charged by them 
have not been shown to be unreasonable. If upon specific complaint it may 
be shown that a particular rate now charged is unreasonable and places any 
shipper on such lines at an unreasonable disadvantage, we will give considera- 
tion to any such complaint. 

In accordance with conclusions herein reached, it is 

Ordered, That from and after November 1, 1923, the joint mileage rates now 
authorized by the Commission to apply between Norfolk Southern stations on 
the one hand and stations on other system line railways in this State be 
made to apply between all stations on the Washington and Vandemere Rail- 
road, including Washington and all points within the State on the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad, to the same extent as joint mileage rates are now published 
on traffic via Washington and Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, distances and 
rates to be made through Porter Junction and Norfolk Southern Railroad. 

Ordered Further, That the several complaints herein considered be dis- 
missed except in so far as the same have been met by reductions made and by 
the terms of this order. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 22d day of October, 1923. # Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE NORTH STATE TELE- 
PHONE COMPANY, HIGH POINT, FOR AUTHORITY TO INCREASE 
ITS RATES. 

Order 

This petition coming on to be heard after the same had been filed and due 
notice given to the mayor of the city of High Point, no appearances were made 
on the day set therefor. 

The evidence is before the Commission that a very modern automatic tele- 
phone exchange has been established in the city of High Point by the peti- 
tioner, and the application is for an increase in the private line business rate 
from $3.50 to $4.50 per month, residence private line from $2 to $2.50 per 
month, and for an adjustment of mileage line rates beyond the base rate area. 

In view of the recent expenditure by the petitioner and its apparent 
unanimous approval by the petitioner's subscribers, who have been notified 
by press advertising and otherwise, and it appearing that the proposed rate 
is not out of line with exchanges of similar class and size, the Commission is 
of the opinion that the increase should be allowed : Therefore it is 



44 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Ordered. That the North State Telephone Company is hereby authorized to 
charge in the city of High Point, effective December 1. 1923, the following 
rates per month : Business private line, $4.50 ; residence private line, $2.50 ; 
rates for other classes of monthly rental phone service shall remain as at 
present, with the exception that beyond the base zone rate area, the petitioner 
is hereby authorized to charge a line rate of forty-five cents per month for 
special lines for each quarter mile or fraction thereof and ten cents for each 
quarter mile or fraction thereof on four-party lines. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 8th day of November, 1923. Clerk. 



IN RE PETITION OF SOUTHERN POWER COMPANY FOR APPROVAL 
OF SCHEDULE OF RATES FOR HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER. 

Order 

By the Commission : This proceeding is in the nature of a rehearing of 
petition of the Southern Power Company, filed in November, 1920. The peti- 
tion of the company at that time was for approval of rates, the most important 
schedule of which was rates for primary power for textile and flour mills, 
beginning at 1.40 cents per kilowatt hour for the first 50,000 kilowatt hours 
and grading down for quantity consumption to one cent per kilowatt hour. 
The next schedule in importance proposed at that time was for distribution 
and resale in municipalities, beginning at six cents per kilowatt hour and 
graded down to 1.2 cents per kilowatt hour. 

After prolonged investigation, the Commission did not approve the schedule 
of rates proposed ; but, its order of July 8, 1921, approved for the first 
schedule rates beginning with 1.25 cents per kilowatt hour, with graduations 
down to one cent, and a schedule for resale in municipalities beginning at 
1.37 V2 cents per kilowatt hour with graduations down to 1.10 cents per kilo- 
watt hour. In arriving at the level of rates approved, the Commission in 
its opinion at that time said : 

"With all attending conditions that may vary performance, it -is need- 
less to pretend that rate schedules can be adopted that will with cer- 
tainty produce a given result. After giving careful thought to all the 
various elements we can apply to them our best judgment and submit 
it to the test of experience. If experience demonstrates that the schedule 
of rates herein provided should be varied in either direction, either 
petitioner or respondents will have the opportunity of bringing it again in 
question and review after it has been given a fair test." 

The petitioner has in good faith operated under that schedule of rates for 
two and one-half years, and has in this time developed two hundred thousand 
of additional horsepower that has been made available for the development 
of additional industries in this State, and now comes back and submits the 
results of its operations. The result for the last year of its operations, ac- 
cording to testimony of petitioner, and based upon the value of its property 
as found by the Commission in its former order, plus capital expenditures 






DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 45 

for additions, was a net earning of 5.91 per cent. The petitioner insists that 
this rate of return is inadequate, and that this inadequate rate of return 
cannot be maintained for 1924, for the reason that there will be brought into 
the system in 1924 new power developments which have been constructed 
upon a higher unit basis of cost than those previously in operation, which 
will increase the average unit cost of its power, and also because it has in- 
creased its capacity for steam production of power and that its steam power 
output for 1924 is estimated to be two and a half times its steam power out- 
put the previous year. This has been found necessary to meet the growing 
demands for power and necessary to maintain an equalized lead during all 
seasons. After taking into account these factors which increase the average 
unit cost of its power, it estimates that, upon the schedule of rates now in 
effect, its rate of return for 1924 would be reduced to 4.43 per cent, and that 
if the rates we are again asked to approve should be authorized, its rate of 
return would be 6.86 per cent. 

The peritonei* is serving three hundred and five industries in this State. 
Copy of the petition now before us. with notice of hearing, was served upon 
each of them. Only fourteen of them were represented by counsel at the 
hearing in opposition to the petition. No testimony was offered in opposition 
to the petition by the respondents, nor was there any test by cross-examina- 
tion of accuracy of petitioner's testimony. 

In argument and in brief of counsel, some questions are presented which 
require consideration. 

It is suggested that the Commission should investigate the relations be- 
tween the Southern Power Company and its subsidiary companies, with rela- 
tion to the prices paid these subsidiary companies for power. This relation- 
ship was fully considered in the former investigation and all pertinent facts 
with relation to it disclosed. Several units of power-producing hydro-electric 
plants in the Southern's system are not owned directly by the Southern Power 
Company. For simplification of financing, developments made at different 
times have been made under separate charters so that first mortgage securities 
could be issued against them without overlapping complications. The power 
developed by these separately owned plants is taken at the dam by the South- 
ern under contract, at four mills per kilowatt hour for the older developments 
and six and seven mills, respectively, for the two latest developments. The 
Bridgewater lake was developed mainly as a storage reservoir for the benefit 
of all other developments in the system, and for the power taken at its dam 
the Southern pays ten mills. When the former petition was presented the 
petitioning company proposed that all of these separate legal entities and 
the contractual relations between them be disregarded and that a fair 
value be placed upon the combined properties as if under one ownership, and 
that such rates be authorized as would produce a fair return on the combined 
properties without relation to their separate legal entities. The petitioner 
made out its tentative case on that basis. The respondents at that time 
insisted that we leave these separate companies as we found them, selling 
their power output to the Southern at the contract prices in effect between 
them, which were considered by the respondents themselves as favorable to 
the customers of the Southern. The Commission in its former order followed 
the views of the respondents on that question, and we do not see that it could 
be favorable to them to follow any other course now. With respect to the 



46 N. C. CORPOBATION COMMISSION 

older and larger units of power plants, the present contractual arrangement 
gives to the customers of the Southern the benefit of power with relation to 
the original cost of these units, although their reproductive value at this 
time is much greater. The only change in this system since the last hearing 
is the construction of a new plant in South Carolina, for which power the 
Southern contracts to pay six mills, and the new plant at Mountain Island, 
near Charlotte, for which power the Southern contracts to pay seven mills. 
Certainly these plants constructed in 1922 and 1923 cannot produce power 
at as low unit cost as the plants constructed ten to twenty years ago, when 
construction costs were much less and when the most economically available 
sites were being developed. Nor is the reasonableness of these contracts con- 
demned by the contracts made by the Southern with independent companies 
within the last two years for a limited amount of power at four and five 
mills. The five mills contract with the Yadkin River Power Company covered 
surplus power which they had for a short period, expiring January first, 1924. 
The Tallassee Power Company did not develop power for resale. It utilized 
all its power in its own manufacturing plants, but when at the close of the 
war it found the market for its product (aluminum) over-supplied, it shut 
down parts of its plant and sold a part of its power in this way, at four 
mills, rather than see it go to waste over the dam, while the market for its 
manufactured products was recovering. 

For the purpose of this order we are not pausing finally upon the question 
of whether the proposed charge of six mills for the output of the new Dear- 
born plant, and of seven mills for the new Mountain Island plant, are reason- 
able charges. To some extent that question is speculative, as at the time 
of the hearing they were not in operation, and the actual annual output of 
these plants will be determined by experience. This will determine the net 
amount of their earnings under these contracts. We have no difficulty in 
finding that they are entitled to a higher rate for their output than the older 
plants in the system. 

It is contended by the respondents that the rates of the Southern Power 
Company are materially higher than rates of the Georgia Railway and Power 
Company and of the Alabama Power Company. 

These questions were also exhaustively considered at the former hearing. 
The rates of these companies are not stated in terms that are comparable. The 
rates of the Southern are simply stated and easily understood. The rates of 
the Georgia Company are complicated with an element of maximum de- 
mand, which with the assistance of a recording meter takes the highest 
point of power consumed in any fifteen minutes' period as the basis for its 
rates for the succeeding six months. There is no satisfactory means by which 
this kind of a rate schedule may be compared with the rate schedule of the 
Southern. It was contended by the expert witness of the Southern that its 
rate schedule would work out less in actual practice. There is nothing more 
clearly determined in rate regulation than that each case must be considered 
with relation to its own facts. Rates must be determined by uniform rules, 
but there can justly be uniformity of rates only when there is uniformity of 
conditions under which the service is rendered. The service of the Southern 
Power Company is materially different from that of the Georgia or the 
Alabama companies. The Southern's power is developed in widely scattered 
units and is distributed over a wider area to find its market. North Caro- 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 47 

lina has no large cities to furnish concentrated fields of consumption like 
Atlanta and Birmingham. A larger part of the Southern's total investment 
is in its extensive distribution system, which reaches twenty-three counties 
in North Carolina and a considerable part of South Carolina. The wider 
the distribution of electric current the more expensive it necessarily becomes. 
This results not only from the higher capital investment in the distribution 
system, but also from the line lossage of power which increases with dis- 
tance of transmission. The Southern has 1,585 miles of high voltage steel 
tower transmission lines in its system, of which 919 miles are in North Caro- 
lina, and 223 miles in South Carolina are used in transporting power to the 
North Carolina lines. Another element of increasing importance in hydro- 
electric service is the cost of coal for equalizing service in marketing the year 
around the equivalent of the maximum efficiency of the hydro-electric plants, 
and the Georgia and Alabama companies are nearer the coal fields than is 
the Southern. Under these varying conditions the rates of one company 
could not be justly used to measure the return which investment in the 
other is entitled to earn. 

Another consideration urged by the respondents is that discrimination would 
result as between customers of the Southern Power Company in North Caro- 
lina and South Carolina. This contention was also given consideration in 
the former proceeding, and has since been passed upon by the Supreme Court 
of our State on appeal. The testimony of the petitioner is that it has always 
had one schedule of rates in effect applicable to its entire system. No rate 
schedules have from time to time been revised but contracts for the sale of 
electric energy have at all times, and in both States, been made in strict 
accord with the schedule of rates in effect at the time such contract was made. 
It is true that with respect to contracts made in South Carolina prior to 1921, 
such contractors will have a lower rate than other customers in either North 
Carolina or South Carolina during the continuance of such contracts. With 
respect to this situation, the North Carolina Supreme Court has said (185 
N. 0., pp. 29 and 30) : 

"Appellants except further that to uphold the rates as established by 
the commission would work an unlawful discrimination against the con- 
sumers of electric power in this State, and it is moved, among other 
things, to set aside the rates and remand with instructions to establish 
rates as low as any enforceable contract voluntarily made by the peti- 
tioning company, the position being that certain existent contracts in the 
State of South Carolina and enforceable there are much lower than 
those fixed upon here. We do not think that a proper consideration of 
the record will disclose that any unlawful discrimination of a substan- 
tial kind and amount would necessarily and as a conclusion of law result 
by reason of the South Carolina contracts referred to. There is evidence 
to the effect that the apparent difference in prices in the great bulk of 
the South Carolina contracts is because the mills in that State, as units, 
are much larger consumers of power than here, and can, therefore, and 
on that account, purchase the current at a lesser rate, and otherwise we 
do not discover in the record any evidence that a contract in South Caro- 
lina at a lower rate, voluntarily made by the power company, is in like 
condition and circumstances with those in this State, and which are 



48 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

the subject-matter of these regulations. Apart from this, however, the 
Corporation Commission in this State is empowered and directed to 
make reasonable and just rates as applied to the distribution and sale of 
power in this State and not otherwise, and such power cannot be directly 
controlled or weakened by conditions existent in other states, either from 
the action or nonaction of official bodies there, or the dealings between 
private parties. To hold otherwise would, in its practical operation, be to 
withdraw or nullify the powers that the statute professes to confer and 
should not for a moment be entertained. Nor is the position approved 
by any well considered authority. Port Richmond and Bergen Point 
Ferry Company v. Board of Chosen Freeholders, 234 U. S., 317 ; Hudson 
County v. State. 24 N. J. L„ 718 : In re Pa. Gas. Co., 225 N. Y., 397 : In re 
Atkinson T. S. F. R. Co., Public Re. 1918, A 843 ; In re Ashton et al. v. 
Potter Gas Company, 1922, B 542; In re Ga. R. R. v. Power Company, 
1921, A 165; Stark Company v. Public Utilities Commission, 131 N. E., 
157. 

"Doubtless if it should be made to appear that a power company or 
manufacturer and seller of electricity in an adjoining or other competi- 
tive state is presently and voluntarily making contracts at a substan- 
tially lower rate than here, our Corporation Commission, in the proper 
discharge of its duties, could well decide that such conditions might 
fully justify it in establishing such contract rate 'as reasonable and 
just,' but no such facts are presented in this record. On the contrary, the 
evidence is to the effect that, while there are some older contracts exist- 
ent in South Carolina at a lower rate, made at a time when the value 
of this power was not known or fully appreciated by consumers, and 
when the company was endeavoring to introduce the power and had not 
itself ascertained a fair basis or rate of charge, no contracts were now 
being made at any such rates ; but, on the contrary, all contracts of 
recent date are at or near the rates fixed upon in this State to consumers 
in like condition and circumstances." 

The suggestion is made that the Corporation Commission should in its own 
motion have a detailed investigation made of the books of the petitioner. In 
the former investigation the respondents moved that the petitioner be re- 
quired to submit to their investigation all its books and records and the 
books and records of affiliated companies, and that they be given sufficient 
time to have a complete audit made. This motion was granted, and the re- 
spondents did employ expert accountants to check and analyze the books of 
these companies. They also employed eminent engineers to inspect the 
physical properties of these companies. After this had been done, no word 
of testimony was presented by the respondents. The respondents at this 
time were in part the respondents in the former proceeding. The petition at 
this time is based upon the testimony in the former proceeding, plus actual 
capital expenditures since that time and plus the operating experience since 
the former order. The investigation formerly made by the respondents of all 
the books and records of all these companies revealed nothing which they 
thought should be brought to the attention of the Commission. If they had 
reason to doubt the accuracy or fullness of testimony of experience since that 
time, or of the accuracy of the analysis of same, the respondents had the 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 49 

same opportunity to subject the records of the company to the test of detailed 
investigation which they formerly made. The respondents have interests at 
stake which would abundantly justify the small expenditure necessary to 
bring such investigation of the company's records up to date, if after their 
former investigation they have any doubt of the accuracy of the facts pre- 
sented. We could not hope to be more successful in developing information 
that would be helpful in determining the issues before us than were the 
experts formerly employed by these respondents. 

In view of the public interest in the rate schedules of a company distributing 
six hundred thousand horsepower of electric energy, we have endeavored to 
give consideration to every contention presented in the record. In our 
former order, we adopted the contentions of the respondents of approving the 
relationship with affiliated companies furnishing power to the Southern upon 
contract rates made with relation to original cost, and valued the property 
of the Southern Power Company itself used in the production and distribution 
of power in this State, at substantially the value that had been placed upon 
these properties for tax purposes. 

The testimony shows that the earnings of the company last year, on this 
basis of value, were less than 6 per cent, and that by reason of developments 
now going into service which have been constructed upon a higher basis of 
unit cost, the average earnings for 1924 will be reduced to less than five per 
cent. Its property is subject to the hazards of storm and flood. 

By a uniform line of decisions of the United States Supreme Court, every 
corporation subjecting its property to the public service is entitled to rates 
that under economical and efficient management will yield a fair return upon 
the value of the property used in furnishing such service. 

When the State exercises its right of regulation of monoply in public service 
to prevent the charging of such rates as will at any time yield more than a 
fair return, it gives bond of its character to permit the use of such rates as 
will yield a fair return under economical management of the property. 

Courts and Commissions have with reluctance named specific percentages 
as satisfying the legal demand for a fair return upon property devoted to 
the public service, for the reason that it is to some extent a variable quantity. 
One of the most recent discussions of this question by the United States 
Supreme Court was in Bluefield Water Works and Improvement Company 
v. West Virginia Public Service Commission, reported in Advance Decisions, 
Public Utilities Reports, August 2. 1923, p. 11, from which we quote : 

"What annual rate will constitute just compensation depends upon 
many circumstances and must be determined by the exercises of a fair 
and enlightened judgment, having regard to all relevant facts. A public 
utility is entitled to such rates as will permit it to earn a return on 
the value of the property which it employs for the convenience of the 
public equal to that generally being made at the same time and in the 
same general part of the country on investments in other business 
undertakings which are attended by corresponding risks and uncertain- 
ties ; but it has no constitutional right to profits such as are realized or 
anticipated in highly profitable enterprises or speculative ventures. The 
return should be reasonably sufficient to assure confidence in the financial 
soundness of the utility and should be adequate, under efficient and 
economical management, to maintain and support its credit and enable 

Part 1—4 



50 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

it to raise the money necessary for the proper discharge of its public 
duties. A rate of return may be reasonable at one time and become too 
high or too low by charges affecting opportunities for investment, the 
money market and business conditions generally. . . . 

"Investors take into account the result of past operations, especially in 
recent years, when determining the terms upon which they will invest in 
such an undertaking. Low, uncertain, or irregular income makes for 
low prices for the securities of the utility and higher rates of interest to 
be demanded by investors. The fact that the company may not insist 
as a matter of constitutional right that past losses be made up by rates to 
be applied in the present and future tends to weaken credit, and the fact 
that the utility is protected against being compelled to serve for con- 
fiscatory rates tends to support it. . . . Under the facts and circum- 
stances indicated by the record, we think that a rate of return of 6 per 
cent upon the property is substantially too low to constitute just compen- 
sation for the use of the property employed to render the service." 

This utility is furnishing a service that invites demand upon it for a con- 
stantly increasing volume of service. The Southern Power Company is under- 
taking in good faith to supply this increasing demand. Within the last two 
years it has added two hundred thousand horsepower to its system. These 
additions alone constitute a greater volume of power than is produced by 
all other companies in the State combined. These new power units would 
turn the wheels of more than four hundred cotton mills of ten thousand 
spindles each. 

It is entitled to a fair return for its service and such rate of return as 
will justify the continuing investment of such sums of capital as may be 
necessary to continue to meet the increasing demand for power for new in- 
dustries in the territory it serves. 

Upon the facts presented, we now find that, except as to rates for resale 
in municipalities, the petitioner is entitled to the schedule of rates for which 
it presented its petition three years ago, and which was at that time in part 
denied, and authority is given the petitioner to put in effect February 1, 
1924, the schedule of rates hereto attached. 

If, after a reasonable period of experience in operation, the respondents 
are of the opinion that these rates are producing more than a fair return, 
they can bring the matter again in issue, with every facility for a full develop- 
ment of all pertinent facts. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of January, 1924. Clerk. 



IN RE APPLICATION OF THE WASHINGTON-HYDE COUNTY TELE- 
PHONE COMPANY, AT BELHAVEN, N. C, AND THE HYDE COUNTY 
TELEPHONE COMPANY, OF SWAN QUARTER, N. C, FOR AUTHORITY 
TO DISCONTINUE SERVICE TEMPORARILY. 

Order 
It appearing to the Commission from correspondence with the above-named 
companies and subscribers of said companies over a period of several months 
that, because of the construction of a highway between Belhaven and Swan 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 51 

Quarter, much damage has been caused to the telephone companies' toll line 
between these two towns, and especially between Scranton and Swan Quarter, 
and because of the said damage wrought by the road contractors to the tele- 
phone companies' property, it is impossible for the telephone companies to keep 
this line in repair for service while detours are impassable except at the 
expenditure of considerable time and at great expense; and, now the tele- 
phone companies above named insist that because of the condition above 
described it is found to be impossible to render service at this time 
without incurring expense considerably in advance of the income: There- 
fore it is 

Ordered, That the above-named companies are hereby authorized to dis- 
continue service on the telephone toll line between Scranton and Swan Quar- 
ter until such time as the roads are made passable and the companies have 
had a reasonable time to repair their facilities : And it is 

Further Ordered, That the Hyde County Telephone Company is hereby 
authorized to discontinue temporarily its service, at least while the toll line 
service is temporarily discontinued. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 23d day of January, 1924. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF RATES ON FERTILIZER MATERIAL AND OTHER 
COMMODITIES BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

By the Commission : Complaints which are responsible for this proceeding 
involve an inquiry into the character of certain movements of freight over 
rail lines in this State to determine whether such traffic should be defined 
as intrastate or interstate in character. On intrastate traffic the carriers 
apply the schedule of rates prescribed by law. On traffic moving over rail 
lines between points in this State, but having characteristics of interstate 
traffic, or being parts of an interstate movement, the carriers apply for the 
movement between points in the- State the schedule of rates which they have 
on file with the Interstate Commerce Commission for application on interstate 
traffic. The differences between these schedules of rates generally are not 
substantial. In some cases the intrastate rate is lower and in some cases the 
interstate rate is lower. 

On the principal movement of mixed fertilizer the intrastate and interstate 
rates are identical, having been made so as results of formal complaints before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission in F. 8. Royster Guano Company v. 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company et al., 50 I. C. C, 34, and in Freight 
Adjustment Steering Committee of Charleston v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
Company, Director General, et al., 53 I. C. C, 506. 

As a result of these proceedings, the Interstate Commerce Commission re- 
quired the carriers to conform their interstate rates on fertilizer from Norfolk, 
Va., and Charleston, S. C, to North Carolina points, to the level of the North 
Carolina intrastate rates, or what has come to be known as the Royster Scale, 
but which is in fact the North Carolina intrastate scale. 

On unmixed fertilizer material — kainit. nitrate of soda, acid phosphate, 
etc. — the rates are identical, except that when these materials are loaded in 






52 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

cars of fifty thousand pounds, minimum, the intrastate regulations prescribe 
that the rates shall be ten per cent less than the rates on fertilizer, for which 
the minimum loading is 30,000 pounds. This provision was in effect when the 
complaints above mentioned were investigated and determined, and no finding 
was made that it constituted a discrimination against interstate commerce. 
These differential fertilizer material rates were canceled during Federal 
operation of railroads, and were voluntarily restored by the carriers after the 
termination of such control. 

One other differentiation as between intrastate and interstate rates should 
be noted. That is, that the interstate rates of the rail lines in this State did 
not make provision for through rates or joint rates as between carriers, on 
shipments from Wilmington to points other than those reached by the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad and Seaboard Air Line Railway, although on interstate 
shipments from Norfolk or Charleston, joint through rates were generally pro- 
vided for in the interstate tariffs. So that, on shipment of fertilizer material 
of 50,000 pounds minimum out of Wilmington to a joint haul station in this 
State, if the shipment were billed as interstate, the rate charged was not only 
ten per cent higher than the intrastate rates, but it also had to bear the burden 
of a full combination of local rates as against through rates from Norfolk. 
Va., and Charleston. S. C, and on such shipments the interstate rate was 
very much higher than the intrastate rate, and also very much higher than 
the interstate rate from Norfolk or Charleston to the same destination, al- 
though the distance was generally less from Wilmington. This has been the 
general situation with respect to fertilizer material rates out of Wilmington 
for many years, but has not given rise to formal complaint because shipments 
from Wilmington have generally been handled by the carriers as intrastate. 

Prior to the movement of fertilizer material for this season, the Atlantic 
Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line joined in issuing instructions to their 
agents at Wilmington that all fertilizer material arriving at Wilmington via 
vessel and tendered for rail shipment, either from shipside or from storage, 
should be billed as interstate unless such commodity had been handled in 
rail haul away from the water front before it was tendered the carrier for 
reshipment. This change in policy, made without having provided any through 
joint interstate rates from Wilmington to points in this State, resulted in very 
much higher rates than had been formerly charged, and also higher rates 
than were contemporaneously charged from Norfolk or Charleston. 

These excessive charges gave rise to numerous complaints, which were set 
down for hearing at the office of the Commission in Raleigh, on February 26, 
1924. 

The particular commodity involved in the specific complaints is nitrate of 
soda. This is an imported commodity, brought into Wilmington via vessel 
from Chile, and as it comes into the port of Wilmington is foreign commerce. 
The particular question for us to determine is whether a cargo, after it has 
arrived at Wilmington and is delivered to the importer, or his order, at 
Wilmington, has reached the end of its journey as foreign commerce, and 
whether or not when resold at Wilmington, and offered to the rail carriers 
at Wilmington for general distribution to consignees in various parts of this 
State, such rail movement from Wilmington to points in this State is intrastate 
commerce. 

There are numerous decisions having some bearing on this question, but we 
are not able to find any decision by final authority directly in point, and 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 53 

probably for the reason no effort has previously been made to give a continu- 
ing interstate character to such local distribution of commerce from a port. 
Analysis of decisions will disclose a trend or tendency in the direction of 
expanding the definition of interstate commerce. The most recent decision 
by the United States Supreme Court having any bearing on it is Baltimore 
and Ohio Southwestern Railroad Company v. Settle. 

In this case, the Supreme Court in effect reverses a former decision and 
holds that a shipment intended for an interstate destination cannot be taken 
from transit at a point in the destination State and reshipped to the desti- 
nation point on an intrastate rate to defeat a higher through rate. In that 
case the particular destination was known when the shipment began its 
journey, and it moved unbroken to such final destination, and the only reason 
for billing the shipment to an intermediate point and reshipment from that 
point was the purpose to defeat a higher through interstate rate. There are 
no such elements in the case before us. The importers of these fertilizer 
materials could not make through shipments to final destination if they 
desired to do so. There is no ulterior purpose to change the nature of the 
traffic. It is brought to Wilmington because there is a sale for it in and 
around Wilmington, and in the whole territory that can be reached from 
Wilmington in rail hauls in competition with like distribution through other 
ports. Such reshipment may be either intrastate or interstate when it leaves 
Wilmington, dependent, in our view, upon the one condition of whether the 
destination beyond Wilmington is an intrastate or an interstate destination 
from Wilmington. 

In the particular complaints before us, the material was purchased at 
Wilmington, or for delivery to the rail carrier at Wilmington, which we 
understand to be characteristic of the general movement. In some cases 
delivery is complete at Wilmington, and in some others purchase is for 
delivery to carrier at Wilmington order notify at destination. In either case 
it is purchased f. o. b. rail carrier at Wilmington. 

Importers at Wilmington have their facilities for storage. Some storage 
facilities are leased from water front carrier terminals, and some are pri- 
vately owned. Some of the traffic is handled to cars direct from shipside, 
after attaching the inspection tags required by our State laws, and such 
parts of cargoes as cannot be at once reshipped are placed in storage. 

The rules which the carriers have recently put into effect designate all 
outbound shipments as interstate shipments, unless the traffic has been han- 
dled by them in rail haul away from the water front and afterwards offered 
for reshipment. We cannot concur in the view that any such arbitrary rule 
can determine the character of the traffic. In our view the essential charac- 
ter of the traffic cannot be determined by the place of storage, duration of 
storage, or whether stored at all. If a cargo is brought into Wilmington for 
resale, at Wilmington, the fact that a part of it had been resold while the 
cargo was en route, or even before original shipment of the entire cargo, 
would not change the character of the independent rail movement from Wil- 
mington, nor would the character of such shipment be changed because the 
parties took advantage of the economy of handling a part of the cargo direct 
from shipside to rail. 

Dealers in Wilmington have the right to import commerce and the sale 
and distribution of it within this State from that city is subject to the laws 
of this State, and the question of whether this is done in good faith cannot 



54 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

be determined by the distance it may be hauled from the water front, or by 
whom hauled, or where it is stored, or by the duration of time intervening 
between the arrival and the reshipment of the commerce. If there is any 
question of the bona fide sale of this commerce at Wilmington, these incidents 
might have bearing on that question. We do not understand there is such 
question. If there is an actual termination of the inbound shipment at Wil- 
mington, and if it is in good faith sold at Wilmington and reshipped to, or 
upon order of, another purchaser in this State, we cannot follow the refine- 
ment of reasoning that would attach an interstate or foreign character to such 
independent movement from Wilmington to a point in this State. Until we 
receive contrary instruction from final authority, based upon a consideration 
of the precise circumstances of movement, sale and resale, involved and inci- 
dent to the distribution of this traffic, we are compelled to conclude that the 
foreign character of this commerce terminates with delivery of this traffic in 
good faith at Wilmington, and that subsequent reshipment or distribution 
in small lots, after resale, to destinations in this State, is commerce within 
the 'State. 

The instructions of the Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line to 
their agents at Wilmington hereinbefore mentioned apply not only to ferti- 
lizer materials imported from a foreign country, but likewise to practically 
all merchandise traffic transported to Wilmington by vessel from any point 
of origin and afterwards shipped by rail to points in this State. The memo- 
randum of agreement reached at a conference of officers of the Atlantic 
Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line Railways, copy of which memorandum 
was presented at the hearing, contains the following conclusions : 

"Canned goods, dried peas, deans, fruits and vegetables. — Where move- 
ment is to cars, direct from vessel, or from waterfront railroad owned 
storage warehouses, or from storage in waterfront public warehouses 
not owned or controlled by carriers or shippers, or from waterfront 
privately owned or leased storage warehouses — apply interstate freight 
rates. 

"Where movement is from carrier's warehouses or from public or 
privately owned warehouses (waterfront or inland), by dray to carriers' 
regular receiving station — apply intrastate rate. 

"Where movement is from public or privately owned inland ware- 
houses and is offered to carriers in cars loaded at such warehouses — 
apply intrastate rates. 

"Where movement is in cars from public or privately owned water- 
front warehouses, but on which there has been a previous movement of 
the traffic from waterfront terminals to such warehouses in switching 
service or dray service — apply intrastate rates. 

"Sugar, bagging and cotton ties. — Apply same principles as laid down 
herein under Canned Goods, etc." 

We have before us, since the hearing in this case, complaint of overcharges 
on sugar shipped from storage at Wilmington to consignees in this State, 
by reason of application of interstate rates to such shipments from Wilming- 
ton because such shipments were originally shipped by Clyde Line to Wilming- 
ton. The National Sugar Refining Company has an established business at 
Wilmington. They are large taxpayers at Wilmington by reason of stocks 
carried in their warehouses at. that point to serve the trade in North and 






DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 



55 



South Carolina that would naturally be reached by distribution from Wil- 
mington, but when a shipment is taken from their storage and delivered to 
the rail carrier for shipment to a customer in this State, such shipment is 
treated, under these instructions, as interstate. 

If the distribution from stock of merchandise arriving at Wilmington to 
points in this State is interstate because handled by vessel into Wilmington, 
practically all distribution from stock of merchandise from interior cities in 
this State to local points in this State is likewise interstate, because the 
larger part of all merchandise stocks at interior points, as well as at ports, 
was received by the distributor or jobber as an interstate shipment. 

Ordered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and the Sea- 
board Air Line Railway Company issue within ten days from this date in- 
structions to their agents at Wilmington to apply the intrastate rates on 
shipments from Wilmington to destinations in this State upon all ship- 
ments having origin as rail shipments at Wilmington and in good faith, by 
or upon order of, or to order notify of, parties other than the original con- 
signee of such traffic at Wilmington ; that contrary instructions now in effect 
be cancelled within ten days, and that copy of such instructions be filed 
with the Corporation Commission within ten days. 

Ordered Further, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and the 
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company make refund, within ten days from 
this date, to consignees, of excessive charges collected, in the sum and to 
the consignees herein set out : 



Waybill Reference 


No. 


Date 


Consignees 


Refund 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


14015 


2/14/24 


Howard-Bobbitt Co., Sanford, N. C 


% 3.12 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


21392 


3/ 5/24 


Jones-Kornegay Co., Mount Olive, N. C 


6.01 


A. C. L., Wilmington. 


1478 
1479 










1480 


1/23/24 


John A. McKay, Wagram, N. C . -. . 


117.35 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


2585 


2/ 6/24 








2606 


2/ 7/24 


T. W. Mewborn & Co., Kinston, N. C 


17.12 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


51405 


6/../23 








52066 


6/_./23 


M. C. Braswell, Battleboro, N. C 


24.36 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


42200 


5/ 1/22 


Fremont Oil Co., Fremont, N. C 


9.07 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


12854 


2/11/24 








12855 


2/11/24 


W. M. Sanders, Smithfield, N. C 


14.50 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


11872 
11873 










11874 


2/ 7/24 


W. M. Sanders, Smithfield, N. C 


19.94 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


1612 


1/ 8/24 








1613 
2637 




W. M. Sanders, Smithfield, N. C. 


14.50 


A. C. L., Wilmington 










2638 


1/10/24 


W. M. Sanders, Smithfield, N. C 


14.50 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


9437 


2/ 1/24 


W. M. Sanders, Smithfield, N. C 


9.06 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


12853 


2/11/24 


W.'M. Sanders, Four Oaks, N. C 


4.48 


A. C. L., Wilmington 


1812 










1876 


1/ 8/24 


W. M. Sanders, Four Oaks, N. C 


25.12 


S. A. L., Wilmington 


142 
163 










189 
86 


2/../24 


Marks Brothers, Broadway, N. C .. 


150. 15 


S. A. L., Wilmington 








87 


2/ 1/24 


S. W. Brawley, Mooresville, N. C . . 


107.69 









By order of the Commission : 
This 22d day of April, 1924. 



R. O. Self, 

Clerk. 



56 N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 



IN THE MATTER OF RATES ON FERTILIZER MATERIAL AND OTHER 
COMMODITIES BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLNA. 

Order Overruling Exceptions 

By the Commission : Upon consideration of exceptions filed in this pro- 
ceeding, it appears that all of the said exceptions relate to matters heard and 
properly considered before the order of April 22, 1924, was entered, except the 
allegations in exception No. 2, that the said order embraces within its scope 
commerce other than fertilizer material, and is therefore void for that the 
defendant companies were not given notice of hearing with respect to com- 
merce other than fertilizer material. The defendants were given due notice 
of hearing upon the question of application of interstate rates on shipments 
of fertilizer material from Wilmington to points in this State. It developed 
at the hearing, upon testimony of the defendants, that interstate rates were 
being charged by them on shipments of fertilizer, material by reason of con- 
ference agreement between the defendant carrier companies, and of instruc- 
tions furnished their agents as result of such conference agreement, and that 
the said instructions covered fertilizer material and other commerce. Copy 
of memorandum conference agreement and instructions was placed in the 
record at the hearing. There is no difference in the principles which will 
determine the character of these shipments. If the carrier conference agree- 
ment and instructions are wrong with respect to fertilizer material they are 
wrong with respect to any other commerce handled in like manner, and a 
hearing upon this principle with respect to fertilizer materials is a hearing 
upon the same principle with respect to other commerce handled in like 
manner. We have found that the carriers are wrong in the conference 
agreement and instructions by which they seek to give an interstate character 
to all shipments moving from the water front or water front terminals in the 
city of Wilmington to points in this State, when such shipments have reached 
their destination at the water front at Wilmington and are shipped after bona 
fide resale at Wilmington. 

Upon consideration of these exceptions they are deemed to be without merit, 
and it is 

Ordered, That the said exception be and they are hereby overruled. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 6th day of May, 1924. Clerk. 



IN RE GAS RATE ADJUSTMENT. 

Order 

Since the issuance of the Commission's order of April 21, 1921, making a 
general decrease in the gas rates set forth in its order of July 29, 1920. the 
Commission has been desirous of taking advantage of any possible reduction 
in the production cost of gas, but coupled with this has been the ever-increasing 
demand for the extension of gas mains in our rapidly growing cities and the 
demand for increased plant facilities to meet the demand for additional gas. 
Recent conferences with representatives of gas companies have resulted in 
some reduction ; and, while the downward adjustments which we are able to 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 57 

make at this time are not in all respects what the Commission would like to 

do under more favorable circumstances, they constitute a substantial step in 

that direction ; therefore, the following reduced and adjusted rates for the 
several cities herein named are hereby approved and promulgated for May, 
1924, meter readings : 

Per 1,000 

Asheville Power and Light Company, Asheville, N. C. cu. ft. 

Prepay meters $1.90 

Regular meters, to 5 M 1.95 

Regular meters, next 5 M 1.85 

Regular meters, next 10 M 1.70 

Regular meters, all over 20 M 1.40 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

Carolina Power and Light Company, Raleigh, N. C, and Durham, N. C. 

Prepay meters 1.80 

Regular meters. to 5 M 1.85 

Regular meters, next 5 M 1.70 

Regular meters, next 10 M 1.55 

Regular meters, all over 20 M 1.35 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

Southern Public Utilities Company, Charlotte, N. C. 

Prepay meters 1.75 

Regular meters. to 5 M 1.60 

Regular meters, next 5 M 1.65 

Regular meters, next 10 M 1.50 

Regular meters, all over 20 M 1.30 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

North Carolina Public Service Company, Inc., Greensboro, N. C. 

Prepay meters 1.80 

Regular meters, to 5 M 1.80 

Regular meters, next 10 M 1.70 

Regular meters, next 20 M 1.55 

Regular meters, next 30 M 1.50 

Regular meters, next 35 M 1.45 

Regular meters, next 100 M 1 1.35 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

North Carolina Public Service Company, Inc., Salisbury, Spencer, and 
East Spencer, N. C. 

Prepay meters 1.95 

Regular meters, to 5 M 1.95 

Regular meters, next 10 M 1.85 

Regular meters, all over 15 M 1.70 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

North Carolina Public Service Company, Inc., High Point, N. C. 

Prepay meters 1.95 

Regular meters, to 5 M 1.95 

Regular meters, next 10 M 1.85 

Regular meters, all over 15 M '_ 1.70 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

Tidewater Power Company, Wilmington, N. C. 

Prepay meters 1.90 

Regular meters, to 5 M 1.90 

Regular meters, next 5 M 1.80 

Regular meters, next 10 M 1.70 

Regular meters, next 20 M 1.60 

Regular meters, next 20 M 1.50 

Regular meters, over 60 M 1.40 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 



58 N. C. COEPOKATION COMMISSION 

Per 1.000 
Tidewater Power Company, Wrightsville Beach, N. C. cu. ft. 

All gas consumed at $2.40 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

Goldsboro Gas and Fuel Company, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Prepay meters 2.30 

Regular meters, to 5 M 2.35 

Regular meters, next 5 M 1.80 

Regular meters, all over 10 M 1.35 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

New Bern Gas and Fuel Company, New Bern, N. C. 

Prepay meters 2.30 

Regular meters, to 5 M 2.35 

Regular meters, next 5 M 1.80 

Regular meters, all over 10 M 1.35 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

Washington Gas Company, Washington, N. C. 

Prepay meters 2.30 

Regular meters, to. 5 M 2.35 

Regular meters, next 5 M 1.80 

Regular meters, all over 10 M 1.35 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

Fayetteville Light and Power Company, Fayetteville, N. C. 

Prepay meters 2.30 

Regular meters, to 10 M 2.40 

Regular meters, next 10 M 2.30 

Prepay meters, all over 20 M 2.20 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

The rates of the Southern Gas Improvement Company, of Oxford, Hender- 
son, and Elizabeth City were substantially reduced, effective December 1, 
1923, which rates are as follows : 

Per 1,000 
Henderson and. Oxford, N. C. cu. ft. 

Prepay meters , $2.45 

Regular meters, to 5 M 2.50 

Regular meters, next 5 M 2.00 

Regular meters, all over 10 M 1.55 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Prepay meters 2.35 

Regular meters, to 5 M 2.40 

Regular meters, next 5 M 1.80 

Regular meters, all over 10 M 1.35 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

The rates of the Winston-Salem Gas Company were reduced on May 11, 
1922, and additional blocks at a lower rate for greater quantity are added 
at this time, which rate is as follows: 

Per 1,000 
Winston-Salem, N. C. cu. ft. 

Prepay meters $1.90 

Regular meters, to 10 M 1.95 

Regular meters, next 10 M 1.75 

Regular meters, next 30 M 1.60 

Regular meters, next 50 M 1.45 

Regular meters, all over 100 M 1.35 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 0\) 

The rate of the Concord and Kannapolis Gas Company, of Concord, was 
reduced ten cents per thousand cubic feet on March 1, 1923, and no further 
reduction is made at this time, for the reason that the Commission has been 
unable to confer with the owner thereof. The rate in effect at the present 
time is as follows : 

Per 1,000 
Concord, N. C. cu. ft. 

Prepay meters - $2.20 

Regular meters, to 10 M , 2.30 

Regular meters, next 10 M 2.10 

Regular meters, all over 20 M 2.00 

Minimum monthly charge, $1. 

All of the above schedules are applicable to service for general retail gas 
for cooking, heating, lighting, and gas for industrial purposes. 

A discount of five cents per thousand cubic feet on all bills paid within ten 
days from the date thereof applies to Asheville, Raleigh, Durham, Charlotte, 
Goldsboro, New Bern, Washington, Henderson, Oxford, Elizabeth City, and 
Winston- Salem. A discount of ten cents per thousand cubic feet applies to the 
rates for Concord and Fayetteville. The rates given for Greensboro, Salisbury, 
Spencer, East Spencer, High Point, Wilmington, and Wrightsville Beach are 
not subject to discount.- 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 30th day of April, 1924. Clerk. 



IN RE APPLICATION OF THE SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND 

(TELEGRAPH COMPANY TO ESTABLISH AN INCREASED RATE IN 
THE TOWN OF WAYNE SVILLE, N. C. 
Order 
Application by the Southern Bell Telephone Company, approved by the city 
officials, Chamber of Commerce, and the Good Fellows' Club of Waynesville 

Ifor increase in telephone rates in that town, having been filed and it appear- 
ing that no increase in telephone rates has been made in that town since its 
acquisition by the Southern Bell and that the Southern Bell has almost 
quadrupled its investment since its purchase until the expenses of the exchange 
exceeded its income for the year 1923 by more than three thousand dollars, 
and the increase asked for and approved by the city and several organiza- 
tions therein is not sufficient to entirely cover the deficit with the present 
number of phones ; and, since the rates asked for are the same as the prevail- 
ing rates in the town of Canton, located in the same county, and practically 
the same as in force at the present time in the town of Morganton ; and, after 
reviewing the history of the exchange, the Commission is unable to ascertain 
any reason why the increase should not be allowed : Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the Southern Bell Telephone Company is hereby authorized 
to put into effect June 1, 1924, in the town of Waynesville, the following 
rates, to wit: 






Business, 1-party , $3.50 

Business, 2-party 3.00 

Business, 4-party.... ; 2.50 



60 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Business, suburban $3.00 

Business, inward 2.75 

Business, extension 1.50 

Business, pay station 

Residence, 1-party 2.25 

Residence, 2-party 2.00 

Residence, 4-party 1.75 

Residence, suburban 2.00 

Residence, extension 1.50 

Extension bells 25 

Extension gongs 50 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 16th day of May. 1924. Clerk. 



RALEIGH GRANITE COMPANY v. COMMON OARRIERS, OF THE STATE 
OF NORTH CAROLINA NAMED HEREIN. 

Order 

Complainant alleges that the present mileage scales of rates for both single 
and joint hauls applicable on rough building stone, curbing stone and paving 
blocks between points in North Carolina are prohibitive ; that there are 
commodity rates between a few specific points and that ninety-five per cent 
(95%) of the entire movement within the State is confined to these favored 
points. Complainant's quarry being of recent development, it has no specific 
commodity rates, and is therefore unable to ship stone. It is alleged further 
that this rate situation has resulted in barring a free movement of stone and 
the substitution of cement and sand where this can be done. Consequently 
stone quarries are stagnant and consumers are getting inferior constructions. 
Complainant proposes a uniform scale of rates for both single and joint 
hauls covering the three classes of stone made of twenty cents (20c.) per ton 
higher than the rate scales applicable, at present, upon crushed stone. 

Other stone shippers, who do not have specific commodity rates, were pres- 
ent at the hearing and stated, in substance, that they realized the stone 
scales were prohibitive and that they were blessed by having the specific 
commodity rates, but their market is limited to the specially favored points 
and they desired to concur in proposal of complainant to establish a uniform, 
reasonable scale of rates for both single and joint haul movement, and that 
barring present contracts they were willing to apply such scales in the future. 
The Norfolk Southern Railroad is willing to accept the scales proposed by 
the complainant. The other carriers' reply generally is to the effect that the 
present specific commodity rates are, in general, a result of competition ; 
that in so far as they are informed the movement in North Carolina is free 
and that stone is also moving freely to interstate points. It is not denied, 
however, that the great preponderance of moving traffic is covered by specific 
commodity rates. A number of exhibits are filed purporting to demonstrate 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 



61 



the reasonableness of the present mileage rates in comparison with rates on 
the same commodities within the South, both intrastate and interstate, and the 
carriers indicate that rates on the commodities in question should not be 
made with relation to rates on crushed stone but rather with relation to rates 
on brick. A proposed scale, which the carriers are willing to apply, is sub- 
mitted. The carriers further contend that the complainant's proposed scale 
is too low and submit exhibit showing movement of curbing stone from 
Granite Quarry for the month of July, 1923, consisting of 87 cars, as follows : 

17 cars to Greensboro, N. C, 

8 cars to High Point, N. C, 

1 car to Reidsville, N. C, 
12 cars to Winston- Salem, N. C, 
15 cars to Durham, N. C, 
34 cars to Charlotte, N. C, 

all of which moved on specific commodity rates. The average haul was 61 
miles, and the average reduction, under the scale proposed by complainant, 
would be $1.64 per car. 

Upon the evidence submitted, the Commission is of the opinion, and so 
finds, that the rates on stone as complained of are unreasonable; that the 
rate situation surrounding the present movement is, to say the least, chaotic, 
in that some of the quarries have specific commodity rates while others are 
compelled to pay the regular mileage scale. For instance, present specific 
commodity rates, twenty tons minimum, and the distances from Granite 
Quarry and Mount Airy, N. O., compare with present commodity mileage 
rates, fifteen tons minimum, and distances from Barham's Siding, N. C, as 
follows : 





Granite Quarry 


Mount Airy 


Barham's Siding 


To— 


Miles 


Rate per 
Ton 


Miles 


Rate per 
Ton 


Miles 


Rate per 
Ton 


Greensboro, N. C 

Durham, N. C . 


54 
109 
135 
184 

49 


$ 1.13 

1.24 

1.24 

1.58 

*1.13 


69 
124 
151 


$ 1.13 
1.24 

1 9A 


187 
132 
106 
82 
262 


$ 2.70 
2.30 


Raleigh, N. C 


2.30 


Goldsboro, N. C 




200 158 


2.10 


Charlotte, N.' C 


125 


1.69 


3.00 



*Rough stone, 51.69. 

It will be noted that even where specific commodity rates are in effect 
they are apparently made without regard to distance and are in some instances 
discriminatory, as, for instance, rate on rough stone from Granite Quarry to 
Charlotte, distance of 49 miles, is $1.69 per ton which is the same rate as 
from Mount Airy to Charlotte, a distance of 125 miles. The specific com- 
modity rates on curbing stone from Granite Quarry to Kannapolis, a dis- 
tance of 21 miles, is 90 cents ; and to Mooresville, 31 miles, $1.02 per ton ; 
while the rate from Mount Airy to Greensboro, a distance of 69 miles, is $1.13, 
and to Raleigh, 151 miles, $1.24 per ton. A glance at the above tabulated 
statement of the going rates is at once convincing that, distance considered, 



62 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

the mileage scale now applicable from Barham's Siding is prohibitive in 
competition with specific commodity rates. Moreover, the Commission is 
convinced that the present mileage scales on these three classes of stone are 
unreasonable in and of themselves and that the complainant is entitled to 
have reasonable rates established. It is therefore 

Ordered, That the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, 

Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Company, 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company, 

Norfolk and Western Railway Company (except Abingdon Branch), 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, 

Southern Railway Company, 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company, 

Asheville and Craggy Mountain Railway (see note 1), 

Asheville Southern Railway Company, 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company (A. E. Smith and J. W. Fry, 
Receivers, see note 1), 

Carolina and Tennessee Southern Railway Company (see note 1), 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railroad Company, 
(see note 1), 

Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad, 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, 

Yadkin Railroad Company, 

Be and They Are Hereby Directed to put in force and effect the mileage 
scales of rates between points in North Carolina, as set out in our Circular 
No. 260, copy attached, which is hereby made a part of this Order. 

It is Further Ordered, That these rates shall supercede the present com- 
modity scales of rates as applied to the same commodity. 

It is Also Ordered, That where there are specific commodity rates now in 
effect which are lower than can be made by use of these scales, the same 
shall remain in force pending present outstanding contracts, and until the 
approval of this Commission for the withdrawal of same is obtained by the 
carriers. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

June 12, 1924. Clerk. 

Note. — Affiliated lines of Southern Railway, including Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Com- 
pany (A. E. Smith and J. W. Fry, receivers), shall observe rule laid down in Corporation 
Commission's Circular No. 253 in applying these rates. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 



63 



Circular No. 260. (Effective July 1, 1924.) 

STONE, MARBLE, GRANITE, VIZ., CURBING OR PAVING BLOCKS, 
BUILDING, DIMENSION OR RANDOM. ROUGH QUARRIED OR 
DRESSED, NOT POLISHED OR CARVED. CARLOAD MINIMUM, 
50,000 POUNDS. PER TON, 2,000 POUNDS. 



Miles 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Haul 


Miles 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Haul 




80 
87 
90 
93 
96 
100 
103 
106 
110 
113 
116 
- 119 
123 
126 
129 
132 
135 
139 
142 
145 
148 
151 
154 
157 
160 


100 
107 
110 
113 
116 
120 
123 
126 
130 
130 
136 
139 
143 
146 
149 
152 
155 
159 
162 
. 165 
165 
166 
169 
172 
175 




162 
164 
166 
168 
170 
172 
174 
176 
178 
180 
182 
184 
186 
189 
190 
192 
194 
196 
199 
200 
202 
204 
206 
209 
210 


177 




170 miles and over 160 


179 




181 


20 miles and over 15 


190 miles and over 180 

200 miles and over 190 

210 miles and over 200. 

220 miles and over 210 

230 miles and over 220 

240 miles and over 230 

250 miles and over 240 

260 miles and over 250 

270 miles and over 260 

280 miles and over 270 

290 miles and over 280. 

300 miles and over 290 

310 miles and over 300 

320 miles and over 310 

330 miles and over 320 

340 miles and over 330 

350 miles and over 340 


183 


25 miles and over 20 


185 




185 




185 


40 miles and over 35 


186 




188 




190 




192 




194 




196 




198 




200 


80 miles and over 75 


202 


85 miles and over 80 


204 


90 miles and over 85 . 


206 


95 miles and over 90 


208 


100 miles and over 95 


210 


110 miles and over 100 


360 miles and over 350. .__ 

370 miles and over 360 

380 miles and over 370 


212 


120 miles and over 110 


214 




216 




390 miles and over 380 


218 


150 miles and over 140. 


400 miles and over 390 


220 









Applicable to lines named in Groups A, B. and C. (see Circular No. 253) 
also Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

June 12, 1924. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE MONROE TELEPHONE 
COMPANY OF MONROE, NORTH CAROLINA, FOR ADJUSTMENT OF 
RATES. 

Order 

The Monroe Telephone Company having made application, on May 19, 1924, 
for adjustment of telephone service rates and increase in certain classes of 
such rates in the town of Monroe and adjacent territory connected with the 
petitioner's Monroe exchange, copy of petition was served upon the mayor and 
board of aldermen of the said town of Monroe and was unanimously approved 
by them on the 26th day of May, 1924, and evidence thereof certified to this 
office under date of May 31, 1924, and the official seal of the said town. 

The classification requested classifies the phone service in Monroe in accord- 
ance with the classification in other similar sized towns and the rates requested 



64 N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

are not out of line with the rates for like service in similar sized exchanges: 
Therefore, in the interest of Jbetter service to the subscribers, it is 

Ordered, That the Monroe Telephone Company is authorized to charge 
monthly rental for phone service on its Monroe exchange, effective July 1, 
1924, as follows : 

Rates Inside Exchange Base Rate Area 

Unlimited Service 
Class of Service Rate per Mo. Joint User Rate 

Business 1-party flat rate $4.00 $1.00 

Business 2-party flat rate 3.50 1.00 

Business 4-party flat rate 3.00 1.00 

Business 1-party inward 2.50 

Business extension 1.00 

Residence 1-party flat rate 2.50 .50 

Residence 2-party flat rate 2.00 .50 

Residence 4-party flat rate 1.75 .50 

Residence extension 75 

Rates Outside Exchange Base Rate Area 

Additional rate for extra distance beyond exchange base rate area, 42 cents 
per month per one-fourth mile or fraction thereof. This charge to be pro- 
rated between two-party and four-party stations. 

For some time the Commission has been endeavoring to make a uniform 
maximum monthly rate for miscellaneous equipment; therefore, the Commis- 
sion hereby takes this opportunity to set forth the following rates as maximum 
rates for the following service : 

Rates for Miscellaneous Equipment and Service 

In connection with either business or residence stations, either inside or 
outside exchange base rate area : 

Rate per Mo. 

Extension gong $0.50 

Extension bell 25 

Auxiliary receiver 15 

Operator's head set 15 

Operator's head set and chest transmitter 35 

Extra listing in directory 25 

Extra line in directory 25 

Service Connection Charges 

1. For individual and party-line service $3.50 

2. For each extension station connected with any class of 

telephone service 3.50 

3. For private branch exchange service the charge for estab- 

lishing service connection : 

a. For each trunk line connecting the private branch 

exchange with a central office 3.50 

b. For each telephone connected to the private branch 

exchange except operator's telephone sets 3.50 

4. To cover in part directory, accounting, circuit and switch- 

board expense in cases where service is established by 
the use of instrumentalities already in place in the sub- 
scriber's premises and no change is made in the type or 
location of such instrumentalities, each main station 1.50 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 65 

Charges for Moves and Changes 
The charges for moves and changes in equipment will be as follows : 

1. For moving a telephone set from one location to another 

on same premises, a charge of $3.00 

2. For moving any other equipment or wiring from one loca- 

tion to another on the same premises, a charge based 
on the cost of labor and material. 

3. For change in type of telephone set, a charge of 3.00 

4. For other changes in equipment or wiring, a charge based 

on the cost of labor and material. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 14th day of June, 1924. Clerk. 






PETITION OF NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY FOR PER- 
MISSION TO DISCONTINUE CERTAIN PASSENGER TRAIN SERVICE 
ON THE ORIENTAL BRANCH. 

Order 

Come now the petitioners, the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, by 
F. P. Pelter, general manager, petitioning the Commission for permission to 
discontinue passenger trains Nos. 55 and 56, operating between New Bern and 
Oriental, N. C. The discontinuance of this train service was opposed by the 
board of trade of Oriental, and other citizens of Pamlico County, represented 
by Z. V. RawLs, county attorney. 

It was conclusively shown by petitioners that the operation of these trains 
was being done at a considerable loss, and this loss has steadily increased, 
month by month, for the past two or three years, especially since the concrete 
road has been completed to Bayboro. The opponents were particularly op- 
posed to the discontinuance of these trains before November 1, 1924, for the 
reason, as stated by them, it would cripple the fish industry, in which con- 
siderable investment has been made, and would therefore entail unreason- 
able loss to the fish shippers. 

After a full hearing and frank discussion pro and con, the Commission 
rendered its decision from the bench, which was that these trains may be 
discontinued by the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, but not earlier 
than October 1, 1924. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 14th day of July, 1924. Cleric. 



IN RE APPLICATION OF HEINS TELEPHONE COMPANY FOR IN- 
CREASE IN BUSINESS TELEPHONE SERVICE RATES IN THE TOWN 
OF SANFORD, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

Application having been made to the Commission and copy filed with the 
mayor of the town of Sanford for an increase in telephone service rates in the 

Part 1—5 



66 N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION 

town of Sanford and no answer having been received from the said mayor, 
and the ten-day period provided by the rules of practice of the Commission 
having expired, and it further appearing that the increase in this particular 
class of service is not excessive and is in conformance with rates charged on 
similar size exchanges elsewhere : Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the Heins Telephone Company is hereby authorized to charge 
for monthly telephone service in the town of Sanford maximum rates as 
follows, (effective August 1, 1924) : 

Business, one-party line $4.00 

Business, two-party line 3.00 

Residence, one-party line ^ 2.50 

Residence, two-party line 2.00 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self. 

This 17th day of July, 1924. Clerk. 



SOUTHERN. FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION v. ABER- 
DEEN AND ROCKFISH RAILROAD COMPANY ET AL. 

Order 

This is a complaint brought against all common carriers of the State by 
J. T. Ryan, secretary-treasurer of the above-named association, on behalf of 
its members, seeking to have authorized for application between points in 
North Carolina the same relationship in rates as between lumber, on the 
one hand, and veneer and built-up wood, on the other, as authorized by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission in its Docket No. 12887, 81 I. C. C, 227, 
decided July 1, 1923. The record shows that in the case decided by the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission the question at issue was one of rate relation- 
ship as between lumber and veneer and not one of the measure of the rates 
on veneer, and that although the case was brought upon the question of 
relationship of rates from specific points to certain defined territories, the 
carriers on their own initiative have since then recognized the reasonableness 
of the findings of the Interstate Commerce Commission, and in consequence 
have established the same relationship for general application throughout the 
South to apply only on interstate traffic. The carriers contend, in this 
case, that this same relationship would be satisfactory to them between 
North Carolina points but for the fact that they consider the lumber rates, 
in this State, are abnormally low, and for that reason they urge that the pro- 
posed relationship should be withheld pending revision in the lumber rates. 
The present rates on veneer, made of native woods, between points in North 
Carolina bear a fixed relationship to the lumber rates, which are, however, 
somewhat higher than here proposed ; while the rates on veneer, made of 
foreign woods, bear no relationship to the lumber rates. The Interstate Com- 
merce Commission's finding, as referred to, fixed a relationship to lumber 
rates for all kinds of veneer, making a distinction, however, between veneer 
made of woods of value and other than woods of value. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 67 

Exhibits in this case were filed by the carriers to show reductions in rates 
on veneer which would be brought about by the application of the proposed 
relationship. The reductions on certain kinds of veneer would be greater 
than on other kinds, but on the whole the reduction would not be unreason- 
able in order to bring them into harmony with rates on lumber. 

The lumber rates, as well as the veneer rates, in North Carolina have borne 
the general increases made during and after the war period, and have been 
subjected to the general ten per cent reduction. 

In establishing the relationship authorized by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, that Commission specifically found that the rates on veneer had 
not been shown to be unreasonable, but that it had been conclusively shown 
that there should be a fixed relationship to the lumber rates and that such 
relationship should be as prescribed by them. In the view of the record in 
this case, it is the opinion of the Commission, and it so finds, that the relation- 
ship in rates on veneer and built-up wood versus rates on lumber between 
points in North Carolina should be the same as that found to be just and 
reasonable by the Interstate Commerce Commission for application to inter- 
state traffic, and which relationship has since been adopted by the carriers of 
their own volition for general application on interstate traffic within Southern 
Territory : It is therefore 

Ordered, That the common carriers of the State be and are hereby directed 
to put in force and effect the following classifications on veneer and built-up 
wood between points in North Carolina : 

Wood 

Veneer, unfigured, made from woods other than woods of value, lumber 
rates. 

Veneer, figured, or made from woods of value, lumber rates plus 15 
per cent. 

Built-up wood, faced with unfigured veneer of woods other than woods 
of value, lumber rates plus 10 per cent. 

Built-up wood, faced with figured veneer or veneer of woods of value, 
lumber rates plus 15 per cent. 

It is Further Ordered, That this classification be made effective on August 
10, 1924. (Supplement to our Exception Sheet will be issued accordingly.) 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 23d day of July, 1924. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE YADKIN RAILROAD 
COMPANY TO DISCONTINUE THE OPERATION OF PASSENGER 
TRAINS NOS. 2 AND 3 BETWEEN SALISBURY AND NORWOOD, N. C. 

Order 

This application was filed July 24, 1924, and copy of same was served 
upon the mayors of Albemarle and Salisbury, and notice of the intention 
was served upon the business interests of Badin and New London. The 



68 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

petition was set down for hearing at 10 o'clock, Tuesday, August 12, 1920, 
and the same coming on to be heard, Superintendent Fletcher and Attorney 
at Law Linn being the only appearances, they filed statements of revenue 
receipts and disbursements which appears to justify the reduction of passen- 
ger service : Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the Yadkin Railroad Company is hereby authorized to dis- 
continue at once passenger trains 2 and 3 now operating between Salisbury 
and Norwood, N. C. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 12th day of August, 1924. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF THE RECEIVERS OF THE 
ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY TO DISCONTINUE THE OPERA- 
TION OF PASSENGER TRAINS NOS. 211 AND 230 BETWEEN GREENS- 
BORO AND RAMSEUR, N. C. 

Order 

The application of the receivers of the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway to 
discontinue the operation of passenger trains .Nos. 211 and 230 between 
Greensboro and Ramseur was filed with the Commission on July 7th. Notice 
was served on the mayors of Greensboro and Ramseur and interested citizens 
on July 8th, and same was set down for hearing by the Commission, at its 
office in Raleigh. Thursday, July 31st. The appearances at the hearing were 
as follows : 

Mr. Sydnor DeButts, Superintendent, Atlantic and Yadkin Railway, Mr. 
I. F. Craven, and Mr. E. C. Watkins and others from Ramseur. N. C. 

It was conclusively shown that the company was sustaining a loss of 
almost all the operating expenses of the service, there being very small 
revenue from its operation. This train service was originally inaugurated at 
the instance of the Commission, and this road is now in the hands of receivers 
and is trying to curtail expenses in many instances in order to continue 
operation. The Commission refused to discontinue this service while it was 
operated as a portion of the Southern Railway System, but now since this 
portion of that system has been placed in the hands of the receivers, there is 
no possible way for the loss sustained on any particular train to be made 
up by profits from any other train, or schedule; therefore the duty of the 
Commission in this case is very clearly defined ; Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the receivers of the Atlantic and Yadkin Railway are hereby 
authorized to discontinue the operation of the present passenger trains Nos. 
211 and 230, and operate instead on a daily schedule the present mixed 
trains Nos. 153 and 154 out of Greensboro to Ramseur and return. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 13th day of August, 1924. Clerk. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 



69 



EDGERTON CONCRETE PRODUCTS COMPANY v. ATLANTIC COAST 
LINE RAILROAD COMPANY, ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY 
(A. E. SMITH AND J. W. FRY/RECEIVERS) , CAROLINA AND NORTH- 
WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY, CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND 
OHIO RAILWAY COMPANY, NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COM- 
PANY, NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILROAD COMPANY, SEABOARD 
AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY, SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, 
WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILROAD COMPANY. 

Oeder 

The petitioner has recently completed and placed in operation, at Wilson, 
N. C, a plant for the manufacture in large quantities of concrete building 
tile. The petitioner shipped fifty-seven cars of this product in the month of 
May. It is heavy load-bearing tile, without ornamental face, and is made in 
blocks 5x8x12 inches. It is used as a substitute for common brick. 

The petitioner's product has been shipped at the Class P rate which is 
the rate applicable at the present time on concrete blocks. That classification 
was made years ago for a concrete block with ornamental face, and which 
has not been shipped in large quantities. The product manufactured by the 
petitioner is a different product than that for which the Class P rating was 
made. It has no ornamental face that may be damaged in transit, its com- 
pressive strength is greater than common brick, is not subject to breakage or 
damage in transit, and loads heavily in either open-top or box cars : It is 
therefore 

Ordered, That from and after September 20, 1924. the defendant carriers 
apply the rates hereinafter set out for single line hauls, and that for joint 
hauls over two or more Unas the rates shall be one cent per hundred pounds 
in excess of this schedule: 



RATES ON HEAVY LOAD-BEARING CONCRETE BLOCKS, WITHOUT 
ORNAMENTAL FACE. CARLOAD MINIMUM, 50,000 POUNDS. IN 
CENTS PER 100 POUNDS. 



Miles 


Rate 


Miles 


Rate 


7 miles and under 

12 miles and over 7 

17 miles and over 12 

22 miles and over 17 

27 miles and over 22 _ _ __ . _ 


3* 

4. 

4| 

4| 

4. 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5| 

5f 

5i 

H 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6^ 


97 miles and over 92 

100 miles and over 97 

120 miles and over 100 

130 miles and over 120 


61 
61 

7 
7 
7 


32 miles and over 27 

37 miles and over 32 . 


160 miles and over 140 

180 miles and over 160 

200 miles and over 180 

220 miles and over 200 

240 miles and over 220- _ . 


7 
7. 


42 miles and over 37 

47 miles and over 42 

52 miles and over 47 


8 
8. 
9 


57 miles and over 52. __________ 




9| 


62 miles and over 57 

67 miles and over 62. 


280 miles and over 260 

300 miles and over 280 

320 miles and over 300 

340 miles and over 320 

360 miles and over 340 _ 


91 
10 


72 miles and over 67. _ 


10^ 


77 miles and over 72. . 


11 


82 miles and over 77 _ . 


11. 


87 miles and over 82 


380 miles and over 360 


11. 


92 miles and over 87 


400 miles and over 380 


12 



By order of the Commission : 
This 2d day of September, 1924. 



R. O. Seef, 

Clerk. 



70 N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION 



TRANSIT PRIVILEGE ON WAREHOUSED COTTON: RUCKER AND 
COMPANY, MULLEN & GILBERT, GREENSBORO WAREHOUSE AND 
STORAGE COMPANY, J. E. LATHAM COMPANY, LATHAM COTTON 
COMPANY, RUCKER BONDED WAREHOUSE COMPANY, HOLMES 
& DAWSON, THOMAS CRABTREE AND COMPANY, S. E. PRUDEN 
AND COMPANY, HEDGPETH AND COMPANY, W. L. OUTZ COTTON 
COMPANY, T. HOLT LAIRD AND COMPANY, J. M. BRANTLEY AND 
COMPANY v. ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY, SEA- 
BOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY, NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY, SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY. 

Order 

The petitioners above named are engaged in the business of storing and 
warehousing cotton at Greensboro, North Carolina. 

The concentration and warehousing of cotton in large quantities has become 
a necessity of this large industry, not alone to provide for an even distribu- 
tion of the product to the mills throughout the year, but also that it may be 
separated as to grades for color, length of staple, etc., so that mills may be 
provided with a supply of cotton of uniform grade and characteristics. This 
is essential to the production of a manufactured product of uniform quality. 
Such uniform quality is broken and injuriously affected if a bale of better 
quality finds its way into the run of a particular mill, and perhaps as notice- 
ably and injuriously as if a bale of inferior quality should be mixed into 
an otherwise uniform run. For these reasons, the warehousing and careful 
assorting and grading of cotton at convenient points intermediate between 
points of production and the mills has become a necessity. 

During the period of Federal management of the railroads the privilege 
of warehousing of cotton in transit was given wide application, in part by 
reason of the unusual congestion of storage facilities when the foreign market 
was cut off. In some instances these privileges have since been canceled. 

The defendant carriers have in effect at the present time warehousing in 
transit privileges at Charlotte, applicable as between points of origin and 
destination within this State. As to interstate shipments, such privilege is 
limited to points of origin and destination on the lines of railroad reaching 
Charlotte. 

The petitioners in this case are located at Greensboro, North Carolina, and 
handle from one-twentieth to one-twenty-fifth of the entire consumption of 
cotton. Approximately a million bales of cotton are spun annually within a 
radius of fifty miles of Greensboro. They have at the present time transit 
privileges on cotton originating on the lines of the Southern Railway, and 
their petition is that this privilege should be extended to include cotton 
originating on the lines of the Atlantic Coast Line, Seaboard Air Line and 
Norfolk Southern, in this State. They urge that this should be done as a 
reasonable development of the necessities of handling and marketing the pro- 
ductions of cotton in Eastern North Carolina, and also to remove the dis- 
crimination against Greensboro in that such privilege is given at Charlotte 
and claimed at Greensboro. It is also shown that the mills within a 
fifty-mile radius of Greensboro use large quantities of the short-staple type 
of cotton produced in Eastern North Carolina and that every reasonable 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 71 

facility should be given to providing a market in the Piedmont section of 
North Carolina for this grade of cotton, a large part of which is now ex- 
ported through Wilmington and Norfolk. 

The Southern Railway Company offers no objection to the extension of the 
transit privilege at Greensboro to cover cotton having origin on other lines. 

The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company insists : 

1. That the transit privilege at Charlotte, covering cotton originating on its 
lines, exists by reason of publication of a tariff by the Seaboard Air Line 
without the knowledge or concurrence of the Atlantic Coast Line, and that 
this privilege at Charlotte should be canceled, which would remove the dis- 
crimination. 

2. That the transit privilege is used to develop industries on the line of 
railroad granting the privilege, and that a carrier should not be required to 
participate in a transit privilege beyond its own rails. 

3. That the Corporation Commission has no authority to require transit 
except on grain and lumber. 

We are not able to agree with either of these contentions. Considering 
them separately : 

1. It has been shown that the concentration and warehousing of cotton is 
a useful and necessary function of the cotton trade, and this privilege should 
not be curtailed or confined to the cotton originating on each separate line 
of railroad. 

2. If the transit privilege were used only to develop industries on the 
line of railroad granting the privilege, and if this privilege were restricted 
to traffic originating on the rails of the carrier granting the privilege, there 
would be no grain mills in the South. The western lines could have concen- 
trated all the grain mills of the country on their lines by refusing participa- 
tion in transit privileges with mills located on the lines of other carriers. 
But for a broader reason than that of locating mills on their lines this 
transit privilege as to grain has almost universal application — that of assist- 
ance in providing a market throughout the country for the product of the 
farms in the sections through which the originating rail lines operate. That 
consideration has its application to the situation presented by this petition. 
There is demand in the Piedmont section of the State for cotton produced 
in the territory in Eastern North Carolina served by the Atlantic Coast Line 
and the continuance of the transit privilege at Charlotte, and the restoration 
of the privilege at Greensboro will provide a wider market for cotton pro- 
duced in the sections of the State served by the Atlantic Coast Line than 
they would otherwise have. 

3. The contention that the Commission is without authority to require 
carriers to establish transit privilege on cotton is predicated on provisions of 
Subdivision 7 of Section 1066 of the Consolidated Statutes, that the Commis- 
sion "Shall make, require or approve «what is known as 'milling-in-transit' 
rates on grain or lumber to be dressed or shipped over the line of railroad 
company on which such freight originated." 

The argument is that because cotton is not included in this section the 
authority with respect to that commodity is excluded. That reasoning would 
be sound if the authority of the Commission were confined to the grant in 
that section. The section quoted, however, is not a grant of authority, but a 
direction to use authority to require transit rates on the two commodities 



72 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

mentioned, and does not exclude the exercise of authority to require the use of 
transit rates on other articles within the rule of reason, and under the general 
grant of authority in Section 1066, Consolidated Statutes, or under the 
authority of Section 1054, Consolidated Statutes, to "make reasonable and 
just rules and regulations to prevent discrimination in the transportation of 
freight." 

The transit privilege means that the consignee is permitted to take the 
commodity out of transit at the concentration point and at a later time reship 
to the point that becomes its final destination at a rate that, together with 
the inbound rate, equals the through rate from original shipping point to 
final destination, which through rate is less than the two local rates, if the 
shipment into and out of the concentration point were considered as indepen- 
dent shipments. The extra service consists of the terminal delivery, when it 
is delivered out of transportation, and the terminal receipt when it is again 
received in transportation. 

The whole question presented in this petition is simplified by the attitude 
of the Southern Railway Company. Any additional service that may be 
performed with respect to the warehousing of cotton at Greensboro on tran- 
sit rates protecting the through rates from points of origin on the Atlantic 
Coast Line to points of final destination will be performed by the Southern 
Railway Company. The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad will get the same 
revenue and perform the same service on cotton originating at stations on 
its lines, and warehoused at Greensboro, that it would receive and perform if 
the cotton were shipped through from its stations to final destination without 
a warehousing privilege en route. Its opposition to the transit privilege at 
Greensboro is based on the supposition that less revenue will accrue to its 
lines -if cotton is delivered to the Southern at Goldsboro or Selma than it 
would earn if it handled the cotton to Wilmington or Norfolk for export, or if 
handled to other points or connections. We are not concerned with, nor is 
there any public interest involved in that question ; nor yet any interest which 
involves an inherent right of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. 
Producers of cotton on its lines have the right to ship it to dastinations which 
give to the Coast Line a styort haul, and it is going far afield for the Atlantic 
Coast Line to insist that the Southern Railway shall not give, or be re- 
quired to give, a transit privilege to such product, after it is received from 
the Atlantic Coast Line, because such product originated on the Coast Line, 
or gives to the Coast Line a shorter haul than it would receive if the cotton 
were shipped to some other destination. 

We find the transit privilege in effect at the present time at Charlotte on 
cotton originating on the Atlantic Coast Line and the Norfolk Southern to be 
a reasonable provision, in line with the natural development of the trade in 
this important commodity ; that the existence of such privilege at Charlotte 
and the denial of it at GreeiLsboro constitutes a substantial discrimination, 
and it is 

Ordered, That the transit privileges now in effect at Charlotte on ship- 
ments of cotton between points in this State be continued, and that the 
carriers, parties to this proceeding, publish tariffs putting in effect not later 
than October 1, 1924, privileges on warehousing cotton, cotton linters and re- 
gins at Greensboro, North Carolina, applicable intrastate from points of 
origin in this State on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, Seaboard Air Line 
Railway and Norfolk Southern Railroad. 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 



73 



There is no complaint before us at this time with respect to any warehous- 
ing point except Greensboro, but carriers will be expected, upon application, 
to publish similar tariffs within reasonable time for the benefit of any other 
points engaged in the warehousing of cotton and handling sufficient quantity 
to justify such tariff publication. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 5th day of September. 1924. Clerk. 



IN RE PETITION OF THE NEWPORT-WESTERN CARTERET TELE- 
PHONE COMPANY FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF TOLL RATES. 

Ordee 

Upon petition of the Newport-Western Carteret Telephone Company for the 
establishment of toll rates between points served by it and the Home Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company's exchanges of Beaufort, Morehead City and 
New Bern, we find that the petitioner has been unable to make a toll exchange 
agreement with the Home Telephone and Telegraph Company for interchange 
of business for the reason that the income of the petitioner is probably not 
sufficient to permit the proper maintenance of its lines. The lines of the 
petitioner are extensive with comparatively few phones compared to the 
mileage, and in order for petitioner to have a return adequate to maintain 
its lines, it is necessary to establish reasonable toll rates between the above- 
named exchanges and points served by the petitioner : Therefore it is 

Ordered, that the petition be granted and the following rates are approved 
subject to complaint and hearing : 



East Broad Creek 
West Broad Creek 

Ocean 

Bogue 

Cedar Point 

Pelletiers 

Carteret Lodge 

Mill Creek 

Grahams • 

North Harlowe.-. 
Blades 



Newport 



Morehead City 


Beaufort 


New Bern 


20 


25 


30 


20 


25 


30 


20 


25 


30 


25 


30 


35 


25 


30 


35 


25 


30 


35 


20 


25 


30 


20 


25 


30 


20 


25 


30 


25 


30 


35 


25 


30 


35 



The above rates shall be limited to a period of five minutes after the con- 
nection has been established. 

Rates to and from all other points to and from points mentioned above 
will be in accordance with standard rates heretofore approved and formerly 
authorized. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 2d day of October, 1924. Clerk. 



74 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



PETITION OF THE RUTHERFORD COUNTY TELEPHONE COMPANY 
FOR AN ADJUSTMENT OF RATES. 

Order 

Upon petition of the Rutherford County Telephone Company for an adjust- 
ment of rates, after the question of an adequate rate was presented to the 
towns affected and no protests were filed, the Commission, in the interest of 
service to the territory served 

Orders, That the Rutherford County Telephone Company is hereby author- 
ized to charge the following rates and put in force the following regulations, 
effective November 1, 1924, subject to hearing upon complaint : 

Regulations 

1. The rates specified herein, with mileage charges when applicable, entitle 
subscribers to an unlimited number of messages to all stations bearing the des- 
ignation of the central office with which subscriber connected. 

Rates and Their Application 

A. Within the base rate area, i. e„ the corporate limits of Rutherfordton, 
N. C, and within a radial distance of one mile from the passenger station 
of the Seaboard Air Line Railway at Spindale, N. C, flat rates are quoted as 
follows : 

Within the base rate area, i. e., the corporate limits of Forest City, N. C, 

flat rates are quoted as follows : 
Within the base rate area, i. e., within a radial distance of one mile from 

the passenger station of the Seaboard Air Line Railway at Caroleen and 

Henrietta, N. C. flat rates are quoted as follows : 

Rate per Month 

Business individual line $3.50 

Business individual line joint user , 1.00 

Business 2-party line 3.00 

Business auxiliary line inward 2.25 

Toll terminal 2.25 

Business extension 1.00 

Residence individual line 2.25 

Residence individual line joint user 50 

Residence 2-party line.... 2.00 

Residence 4-party line 1.75 

Residence extension.... 75 

B. Outside the area indicated in (A) and within the territory regularly 
served by primary classes of service, the following rates, plus an additional 
rate for extra distance beyond exchange base rate area of 42 cents per month 
per one-fourth mile or fraction thereof, to be prorated between two-party 
and four-party stations, will apply : 

Rate per Month 

Business individual line $3.50 

Business individual line (joint user) 1.00 

Business 2-party line 3.00 

Business 4-party line 2.50 

Business auxiliary line inward 2.25 

Toll terminal :.... 2.25 

Business extension 1.00 

Residence individual line - 2.25 

Residence individual line joint user 50 

Residence 2-party line 2.00 

Residence 4-party line 1.75 

Residence extension 75 






DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 75 

O. Beyond the base rate area multi-party line service of not less than 
four stations or more than eight stations per line is furnished at the monthly 
rates given below, provided the company has existing pole routes available 
or provided the subscriber will at his own expense construct and maintain a 
circuit to a pole route of the company : 

Rate per Month 

Business $3.00 

Residence ...., 2.00 

D. In connection with either business or residence stations, either inside 
or outside exchange base rate area, the following rates for miscellaneous 
equipment and service will apply : 

Rate per Month 

Extension gong $0.50 

Extension bell 25 

Auxiliary receiver 15 

Operator's head set.... 15 

Operators head set and chest transmitter 35 

Extra listing in directory 25 

Extra line in directory 25 

E. Beyond the base rate area, farmers' line service is furnished at the 
monthly rates given below, provided the subscriber furnishes, owns and main- 
tains his line to the exchange base rate area, and furnishes, installs and 
maintains his own instruments : 

Minimum charge per line (with not more than 6 stations 

thereon) $3.60 

Additional stations in excess of 6. each 60 

F. Service connection charges : 

1. For individual and party line service $3.50 

2. For each extension station connected with any class of 
telephone service 3.50 

3. To cover in part, directory, accounting, circuit and switch- 
board expense in cases where service is established by 
the use of instrumentalities already in place in subscrib- 
er's premises and no change is made in the type of loca- 
tion of such instrumentalities, each main station 1.50 

G. Charges for moves and changes : 

1. For moving a telephone set from one location to another 

on the same premises, a charge of 3.00 

2. For moving any other equipment or wiring from one loca- 
tion to another on the same premises, a charge based on 
the cost of labor and material. 

3. For change in type or style of telephone set, a charge of.. 3.00 

4. For other changes in equipment or wiring, a charge based 
on the cost of labor and material. 

H. Restoration of service charge: 

When service has been suspended for nonpayment of 
charges, restoration of service is made only upon payment 
of the charges due, and in addition a restoration charge 
of $1.00 

By order of the Commission : R. o. Self, 

This 25th day of October, 1924. Clerk. 



76 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

IN RE PETITION OF BLACK MOUNTAIN RAILWAY COMPANY FOR 
PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE SUNDAY PASSENGER SERVICE ON 
ITS LINE, FOR PERMISSION TO DISCONTINUE ITS STATION AT 
PENSACOLA. NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

The Black Mountain Railway Company, petitioner, makes application for 
the discontinuance of Sunday passenger service on its line between Kona 
in Mitchell County, North Carolina, and Pensacola in Yancey County, North 
Carolina, and also requests that it he given permission to discontinue its 
station at Pensacola. 

This railroad was built primarily for lumbering purposes ; and, for the 
purpose of giving its patrons along the line and its employees ingress and 
egress, it has operated some limited passenger equipment on said line. This 
service was inaugurated voluntarily by the company, and now since its busi- 
ness at Pencacola has practically been abandoned and as there is no other 
business at that point of sufficient volume to warrant this service for travel 
on Sunday, the petition is granted ; and, also, for the same reason, the peti- 
tioner is hereby permitted to reduce the station service at Pensacola from that 
of agency to nonagency with prepay privileges. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 5th day of December, 1924. Clerk. 



IN THE MATTER OF PETITION OF THE MARION TELEPHONE COM- 
PANY FOR INCREASE IN TELEPHONE RATES IN THE TOWN OF 
MARION, NORTH CAROLINA. 

Order 

This case coming on for consideration, the petitioner presented evidence to 
show that an investment has been made in new equipment to the amount 
of $25,716.31 ; that an audit by Lockwood, Bonnell and Company, public 
accountants, shows that the petitioner had invested in the old plant and 
equipment a net amount of $9,383.86 ; and that this equipment has been dis- 
carded and salvaged for an amount estimated to be about $3,500; that there 
is no comparison between the relative conditions of the old and new plants 
and service ; and that the rates authorized for this company were inadequate 
for the old equipment and service, to say nothing of the additional and im- 
proved service. 

The board of aldermen of the town of Marion in session on December 4, 
1924, at which time a copy of the petition was presented to it for considera- 
tion, said, in part, as follows : 

"And Whereas, in the opinion of the board the petition is meri- 
torious and the relief asked for is reasonable, considering the 
proposed improvements now being inaugurated, all of which is 
found to be as stated in the petition. . . . And Whereas, in 



DECISIONS AND ADJUSTMENT OF COMPLAINTS 77 

the opinion of the board the rate should become effective February 
1, 1925, instead of January 1, 1925. ... It appearing that the 
Telephone Company will ask the Commission to grant the relief 
commencing on that date. . . . Therefore, the board approves 
the petition." 

Therefore it is 

Ordered, That the Marion Telephone Company is hereby authorized, begin- 
ning February 1, 1925, to change the following monthly rental rates on its 
Marion exchange : 

Business, special line $3.50 

Business, two-party line 3.00 

Residence, special line , 2.25 

Residence, two-party line .... . 2.00 

Residence, four-party line 1.50 

Rural : Eight-party harmonic ringing line, equipped, owned 
and maintained by Telephone Company (changed from 12- 

party code ringing line) 2.00 

Switching rural lines owned by subscribers, minimum 8 
stations per line , 50 

Additional Miscellaneous Service Charges 

Extension telephone $1.00 

Extra for desk telephone 25 

Extra for extension bells 50 

Installing, new connection 3.50 

Move from one address to another 3.50 

Move from one room to another 3.00 

Connection charge 1.50 

Change of directory listing , 1.00 

Extra for more than one listing in directory, each extra 
listing 50 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

This 5th day of December, 1924. Clerk. 






IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF THE SEABOARD AIR LINE 
RAILWAY COMPANY FOR DISCONTINUANCE OF TRAINS 31 AND 34. 



Order 

By the Commission : This petition came on to be heard before us on October 
10, 1924. It asked permission for the discontinuance of trains numbered 31 
and 34 operating between Charlotte and Rutherfordton. All the principal 
towns along the line of the road affected by the taking off of these trains 
asked for in the petition resisted the demand of said petition except the city 
of Charlotte, which is by far the most important city reached by such trains, 
Only one citizen of this city protested. 

From the evidence taken the Commission finds the following facts : 
1. That the number of passengers moving by all Seaboard Air Line trains 
west of Charlotte has decreased 61 per cent since 1920, and the total number 



78 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

of passengers handled per train per day has decreased from an average of 
70 in 1920 to an average of 27 in 1924, the said decrease being due to the 
competition of jitney-bus lines and the shutting down of cotton mills in the 
section served by said railroad. Comparing the passenger business of these 
trains for the months of June, July, and August of 1919, and the same months 
for 1924, we find that there has been a decrease of 68 per cent in the number 
of passengers hauled by train 31 and a decrease of 62 per cent in the number 
of passengers hauled by train 34. 

2. That the railroad company is sustaining a loss on the operation of trains 
31 and 34 and trains 15 and 16, which are all the passenger trains operated 
between Charlotte and Rutherfordton, at a rate of $45,705 per annum. , 

3. That trains 31 and 34 are of less importance to the people located be- 
tween Charlotte and Rutherfordton than are trains 15 and 16, which take 
the early morning mails and express out of Charlotte, and should be allowed 
to be discontinued rather than trains 15 and 16. 

The evidence in this case disclosed, conclusively, the fact that the progress 
of automotive transportation is curtailing the use of local passenger service of 
railroads. The competition of jitney-bus lines will gradually force the rail- 
roads to curtail local service and to improve through service. To force rail- 
roads to continue local service at a great loss will greatly hamper them in 
the discharge of their more important duties to the public, now that the 
jitney-bus can accommodate the local travel. The Commission is assured 
that plans are on foot which, if carried out, will provide a fine summer 
schedule between Charlotte and Rutherfordton, which will largely compensate 
that section for the loss they are now to suffer : Wherefore it is 

Ordered, That the petition of the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company for 
authority to discontinue trains 31 and 34 now operating between Charlotte 
and Rutherfordton on or after January 1, 1925, be granted, such train service 
to be restored at any time upon complaint and hearing. 

By order of the Commission. W. T. Lee, 

This 13th day of December, 1924. Chairman. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 



RAILROAD COMPANIES 

Citizens of Selma v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and Southern Railway 
Company. Depot facilities. This is petition filed by the citizens of Selma 
in 1913 asking for a new station building. Order was made as of September 
10, 1914, requiring defendant companies to erect at the junction point a 
station adequate for the future needs of such an important junction. In the 
meantime, war having been declared, all building by railroad companies was 
stopped. However, after business was resumed, this matter was again taken 
up and, under date of April, 1922,. another order was issued by the Commission 
requiring that the construction of the depot be started. Exceptions were filed 
to this order and overruled by the Commission and notice of appeal filed by 
the companies with exceptions and assignments by defendant Southern Rail- 
way Company. Hearing was then arranged in order to decide on an equitable 
basis for erecting station. Order made as of December, 1922. It now appear- 
ing that the station building has been erected, case is closed. 

Citizens of Kinston v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Company. Petition for union depot. This petition was 
filed in 1913 and order made as of April, 1915, requiring the erection of said 
depot. In the meantime war was declared and building of depots by railroad 
companies was discontinued ; however, after business was resumed the matter 
was taken up and order made by the Commission authorizing defendant com- 
panies to proceed with the erection of the depot. It now appearing that depot 
has been completed, case is closed. 

Town of Cary v. Seaboard Air Line Railway and Southern Railway Com- 
panies. Petition for a union passenger depot at Cary. This case was 'filed 
in 1913 and order made requiring erection of a union passenger station ade- 
quate to the present and future demands of said connecting point. In the 
meantime, war having been declared, the building of all depots by railroad 
companies was discontinued ; however, after business was resumed, the depot 
was erected and case is closed. 

Citizens of Lansing v. Virginia-Carolina Railroad Company. Petition for 
adequate depot accommodations. This petition was filed in 1917. It ap- 
pearing that Lansing was within five miles of another depot and the Commis- 
sion being without authority to require establishment of depot accommoda- 
tions within a limit of five miles of another depot, case is dismissed. How- 
ever, in 1921, petition is again filed and it appearing that the town of Lansing 
had grown very rapidly and the facilities furnished at that point were totally 
inadequate to handle the business, an order was made requiring the erec- 
tion of a building commensurate with demands of the growing community. 
Exceptions filed to said order and amended petition is then filed by the citi- 
zens of Lansing and surrounding communities tributary thereto, asking that 
the railway company be permitted to discontinue Tuckerdale as a regular 
station, providing a caretaker or commission agent for the convenience of 



80 N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

the patrons thereat. The railway company indicates its willingness to accept 
and comply with the proposal contained in the amended petition. Further 
order is made requiring the erection of the said station. Station having been 
erected, case is closed. 

Citizens of Lexington v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for passen- 
ger station. This petition was filed in 1919 and this being at the time when 
the U. S. Railroad Administration did not entertain any proposal for con- 
struction of new depots, the matter was left open. In 1922 the question of 
depot was taken up and defendant company advises Commission that plans 
for a passenger station had been completed and that depot would be erected 
in a short time. Case* closed. 

Citizens of Ela v. Appalachian Railroad Company. Petition for improved 
facilities for handling passengers and also freight. After investigation peti- 
tion is denied. Later on, however, the matter is again brought to the atten- 
tion of the Commission, with Southern Railway as defendant also, and again 
investigation is made and agreement is reached between defendant companies 
to enlarge and make station satisfactory. Case closed. 

Citizens of Plymouth v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Company. Petition was filed in 1920 and after hearing 
order was made requiring the erection of station. Exceptions were filed and 
order made overruling same. Another petition is filed with plans, and hearing 
as to a portion of the cost, and final order made on same in June, 1922. The 
depot having been built, case is closed. 

Citizens of Columbia v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Petition 
asking for establishment of Sunday train between Mackey's Ferry and Colum- 
bia. The Sunday service inaugurated, and defendant company asked that 
after same is given a fair trial the earnings are found to be below the ex- 
penses, they be permitted to discontinue such operation. Case closed. 

Town of Saluda v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for depot facili- 
ties. It appearing that the station at Saluda has the accommodations of 
other stations to take care of the normal business, and this being a very 
small station and the carriers being unable to build for lack of funds and 
until conditions due to the war have improved, the matter is deferred until 
conditions are more normal. The matter is again to be taken up, at which 
time defendant company will be in a better position to comply with request. 
Adjusted. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
discontinuance of mixed trains No. 57 and 58 on Oriental Branch and to 
operate in their place tri-weekly freight trains and also to operate trains 55 
and 56 as mixed trains instead of straight passenger trains. This applica- 
tion was granted. Upon complaint by citizens of Bayboro and Oriental, the 
Commission authorizes the restoration of former schedule of trains 55 and 56, 
also tri-weekly mixed trains. Then in 1922 again the question of discon- 
tinuance of trains on this branch arises. However, it appears that this was 
due to strike of the railroad employees and was only temporary. Case 
is closed. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
authority to discontinue certain passenger train on the Columbia Branch and 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 81 

also change in trains 17 and 18. The petition for discontinuance is denied 
and the change with reference to schedules adjusted ; also the question of 
inaugurating Sunday service on the Columbia Branch is involved in the 
matter of schedules. This matter is taken up for investigation and after a 
conference the defendant company is not required to restore Sunday service. 

Citizens of Ruffin v. Norfolk Southern Railway Company. Complaint of 
passenger service and petition for erection of depot. Dismissed. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Petitions to close 
agencies at Osgood, Lake View and Pine Bluff during the summer season 
each year and make same prepay stations. Petitions were granted as to 
Osgood and Pine Bluff. Protests filed by citizens and the Commission advises 
that permission would still be granted to defendant company to discontinue 
the Osgood Agency temporarily ; but, due to the prolonged correspondence as 
to Pine Bluff, advice is received from defendant company that arrangements 
are being made to open agency at Pine Bluff on December 1st. 

State's Prison v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company and Southern Rail- 
way Company. Complaint of freight cars standing on crossing in front of 
prison. Defendant companies issue bulletin relative to trains blocking the 
crossing to the effect that when trains occupy crossings more than fifteen 
minutes crossings will be cut. 

The Commission is advised by the Interstate Commerce Commission that 
application has been made by the Norfolk Southern Railroad Company and 
Carthage and Pinehurst Railroad Company to abandon a line of railroad in 
Moore County. The Interstate Commerce Commission is advised by the 
North Carolina Corporation Commission of its desire to cooperate in any way 
possible in a way of hearing and giving evidence. Hearing is had in Raleigh 
and the Commission is advised of order made by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission authorizing the said line of railroad to be abandoned. 

Skyland Hosiery Company v. Southern Railway Company. Petition ask- 
ing that Carolina Special stop on flag its trains 27 and 28 at East Flat Rock. 
Defendant Company advises that petition would be granted. However, later 
on this matter was taken up again with advice from petitioners that defendant 
Company had again made a change in its schedule, leaving off East Flat 
Rock as a flag stop for the trains mentioned. Defendant company then 
advises that these trains are through trains from Cincinnati to Charleston, 
making stops for through passengers and if stops are made it would become 
a local train. With the train service then furnished petitioners, petition is 
denied. 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company to the Commission. Applica- 
tion for change in schedule and discontinuance of trains 50 and 63 for the 
summer season. This application was granted. However, after trains were 
restored the following year the same application was made to the Commission 
for the summer season of 1923. Protest was filed by towns affected by this 
change in schedule but, after further investigation, same is withdrawn and 
application granted. 

James E. Sheppard v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of accom- 
modations for colored people on Durham and Richmond train. Adjusted. 

Part 1—6 



82 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Tuskaseegee Manufacturing Company v. Piedmont and Northern Railway- 
Company. Complaint of warehouse conditions for L. C. L. shipments. Ad- 
justed. 

Citizens of Spindale v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for erection 
of new station. Dismissed. 

Citizens of Bayboro, Belhaven, Beaufort, Goldsboro, Greenville, Kinston, 
New Bern, Oriental. Roper, Washington, Columbia and Creswell v. Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Company. Complaint of discontinuance of trains. It 
appearing that the discontinuance was due to strike and that same would be 
reinstated as soon as conditions could get settled, case is closed. 

George R. Pou, Smithfield, v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. . Com- 
plaint of unsafe condition at crossing on the highway immediately northeast 
of the Smithfield depot of defendant company. This matter was taken up 
by the defendant company and Highway Commission with a view of relocat- 
ing the crossing. Case closed. 

Town of Roseboro v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint 
of facilities for handling cotton, asking for additional space. Adjusted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for authority 
to close agency at Lyons and continue the station as a prepay station. Pro- 
tests are filed against same and, after conference, petition is denied. 

Southern Railway Company to Commission. Permission to close agency 
at Millboro and make same prepay station. Granted. 

Tallulah Falls Railway Company v. Franklin Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Complaint of telephone crossing near Milepost 45. Complainant is 
advised that the crossing must be brought up to the standard specifications. 
Upon receipt of information from defendant company that this will be done, 
case is closed. 

Citizens of Aulander v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint 
of station accommodations at Aulander with reference to heating and lighting 
same. Electric lights installed in the station and with advice that same 
will be properly heated, case is closed. 

Citizens of Addie v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for extension 
of siding and depot facilities. Adjusted. 

Citizens of Sunbury v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Complaint of 
service at Sunbury, the office not being open for sufficient time before 
arrival of train in the morning to allow express to be received, and con- 
dition of station as to light and fire. It appearing that the difficulty ex- 
pressed was due to a new agent serving only temporarily, and with informa- 
tion from defendant company that same would be corrected, case is closed. 

Southern Railway Company to Commission. Application to cut out stops 
on Nos. 11 and 12 at the Asylum, Rose, Whitley, Pine Level, Wilson Mills, 
and Auburn. Granted as to Wilson Mills, Auburn and Asylum. 

Citizens of Kinston v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of sleeping 
car service between Goldsboro and Greensboro with reference to unnecessary 
inconvenience accorded patrons, especially on the eastward trip. Adjusted. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 83 

Citizens of Washington v. Norfolk Southern Railroad. Complaint of change 
of passenger transfer at Marsden instead of Washington. Defendant Com- 
pany authorized to continue transferring passengers at Washington. Case 
closed. 

Pitt County Chamber of Commerce v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 
Complaint of change in schedule of train No. 18. Withdrawn. 

Rev. M. E. Cotten v. Seaboard Air Line Railway. Complaint of condition of 
station facilities at Maxton. Adjusted. 

Town of Lillington v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Complaint of 
passenger and mail service from Raleigh to Fayetteville, asking for addi- 
tional service. After investigation defendant company reestablished regular 
passenger train service and better mail service is then provided, case is 
closed. 

Laurinburg and Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Applica- 
tion for discontinuance of passenger traffic. Granted. 

Citizens of Spruce Pine v. Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Company. 
Petition asking for improved depot facilities. Defendant company advises 
that the improvement of station facilities at Spruce Pine is on its list of 
additions and betterments for the following year with the intention of taking 
care of same soon. Case is closed. 

T. T. Murphy v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
service between Fayetteville and Wilmington with reference to shipment of 
express. Dismissed. 

Shippers at Clinton, N. C. Cotton Growers Cooperative Association v. 
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of shipping facilities at 
Clinton. Additional facilities contracted for, case closed. 

Citizens of Camden Station v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Con- 
dition of road leading to station, same being owned by defendant company. 
Adjusted. 

Southern Railway Company to Commission. Application for authority to 
change Hewits to nonagency station. Granted. 

Shippers of Rose Hill v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Peti- 
tion asking that refrigerator cars be re-iced for shipping fruits. Defendant 
Company advises that the matter of refrigerator service is under the juris- 
diction of a Fruit Growers Trust Company and that the same will be taken up 
with them with a view of obtaining satisfactory service. Adjusted. 

Danville and Western Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for installation of round-trip passenger train between Leaksville and Dan- 
ville, Va. Granted. 

Citizens of East Marion v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for flag 
stop 114 miles south of Marion. It appearing that the point at which stop 
is desired is so near Marion and the proper topography of the country un- 
favorable to trains being stopped there on account of incline and the revenue 
derived therefrom would not warrant undue expense, petition is dismissed. 

New Bern Chamber of Commerce v. Norfolk Southern Railroad. Com- 
.plaint of change in leaving time of train No. 16 from Goldsboro, thereby 



84 N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 

causing all connections from the North and South and West to be missed. It 
appearing that connections are to be taken care of in the change, case dis- 
missed. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for authority 
to discontinue agency at Mount Mourne and make same prepay point. Peti- 
tion protesting against same is filed but, after investigation, the Commission 
realizing that the business handled does not permit requiring the continuance 
of agency, the application is granted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application to close 
warehouse at Hickory for receipt of freight at 4 :30 p.m. Granted. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Defendant company files 
with the Commission changes in its various schedules, calling special atten- 
tion to trains 21 and 22 eliminating many stops from the schedule in order 
to maintain a fast schedule for this through train from the East to the West. 
Schedule approved. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application to close 
agency at Ore Hill. Protest filed against same. Application withdrawn. 

R. D. Herndon v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of irregular 
passenger train service causing delay in delivery of mail and inconvenience 
of passengers on account of shifting work. Schedule arranged to take care 
of complaint, case closed. 

Citizens of Dendron v. Southern Railway Company. Petition to make 
Dendron stop for passenger trains. Defendant company advises that there 
was not sufficient people in the vicinity to justify this stop and the grade being 
very heavy, there would be a liability of pulling out drawheads in making 
stop. Petitioners advised that the Commission could not authorize this stop 
without first having hearing and no further complaint being made, case is 
closed. 

Citizens of McDowell County v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Peti- 
tion asking that Graphite be made a stop for westbound trains. This peti- 
tion is granted by defendant company with reference to train No. 21. Case 
closed. 

New Bern Chamber of Commerce to the Commission. Petition for Pullman 
service between Goldsboro and Asheville to be extended to and operated be- 
tween Beaufort and Asheville. Dismissed. 

Town of Tryon v. Southern Railway Company. Petition asking for im- 
provements of the station at Tryon. Petition granted, case closed. 

W. J. Smith and Son v. Southern Railway Company. Complainant files 
with Commission letter with reference to abandonment of the Oriental 
Branch of defendant company. After investigation, it appearing that the 
road is not to be abandoned, case is dismissed. 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company to the Commission. Appli- 
cation for authority to handle special movement of Pullman cars between 
Hickory and Lenoir. Granted. 

Rocky Mount Chamber of Commerce v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Com- 
pany. Application for reinstatement of Pullman service on mixed trains 
Nos. Ill and 112 between Goldsboro and Asheville. Dismissed. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 85 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Schedule of summer 
train service. Approved. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Change in schedule of 
No. 111. Approved. 

Burkhead, Bruton and Company v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 
Petition asking for rebuilding of station at Candor, same having been destroyed 
by fire. It appearing that defendant company has its plans for rebuilding 
same in course of preparation, case is closed. 

Harris Motor Company v. Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company. Applica- 
tion for pipe-line connection for unloading gasoline in carload lots. Pipe 
installed. Case closed. 

Tallulah Falls Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
permission to close the freight and telegraph office at Prentiss. Petition 
protesting against same is filed, telegraph service discontinued and agency 
retained. 

Town of Murphy v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint as to agent 
and method of handling freight. Adjusted. 

Norfolk- Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application for 
permission to operate trains Nos. 30 and 31 between Raleigh and Charlotte as 
through mixed trains. Petitions protesting against same were filed and the 
matter set down for hearing. After conference the application is granted. 

C. M. Bernard v. Southern Railway Company. Petition asking for im- 
provement of station facilities at Rural Hall. Defendant company advises 
that facilities are amply adequate and reasonable to take care of the busi- 
ness furnished and its funds were insufficient with which to make the im- 
provement suggested. Complainant is given said information. There being 
no further complaint, case is closed. 

Citizens of McFarlan v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and Western 
Union Telegraph Company. Petition asking for re-establishment of tele- 
graph office. It appearing in answer of defendant Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road Company that there is no need of telegraph office for the handling of 
trains and not sufficient amount of business for the Western Union to open 
an office, the petitioner is so advised. There being no further complaint, 
case is closed. 

Patrons of Dobidge Station v. Atlantic and Yadkin Railroad Company. Peti- 
tion asking for the erection of umbrella shed at said station. It appearing 
that the business is insuffient to warrant expenditures for such facilities and 
the Commission being without jurisdiction to make an order requiring same 
without giving the parties an opportunity to be heard, the matter is left 
open for further advice from patrons. Not having further complaint, case 
is closed. 

H. McA. Rose v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Complaint of 
failure of Seaboard Air Line and Atlantic Coast Line trains to make connec- 
tion at Maxton. Defendant company advises that it is not indifferent to 
this connection and will continue their effort to maintain same. Case closed 

Seaboard Air Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Changes in 
passenger train schedules. Approved. 



8b N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

Wilson Brothers v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Complaint of 
inability to secure sufficient cars at Mims siding for shipments of lumber. 
Satisfactory adjustments having been made, case is closed. 

Roy Pitts v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of condition of 
loading track at Balsam. Adjusted and case closed. 

Citizens of Marion and Charles E. Webb v. Southern Railway. Train 
service between Marion and Rutherfordton. After much correspondence the 
matter was set for hearing at the Battery Park Hotel, Asheville, and Com- 
missioner Lee held a conference with those interested. Adjusted. 

Citizens of Relief v. Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Company. 
Petition for depot. After much correspondence and upon investigation it 
is found by the Commission that the station at Relief is within five miles of 
another station and it being the ruling of the Commission not to order im- 
provements in small stations in less than five miles of each other the peti- 
tioners are so advised. The matter was again taken up by petitioners later 
on, asking for additional depot facilities, and upon investigation it appeared 
that the station deserved some consideration, especially to the extent of 
making passengers comfortable and protecting local freight shipments. De- 
fendant company was so advised. However, there being outstanding orders 
for depots which the carriers had been unable to build for lack of funds 
and until conditions were improved, petitioners were advised that little 
progress might be looked for in the way of extension and betterments in trans- 
portation facilities. Still later the matter was again taken up with the 
defendant company with a view of making improvement and the Commission 
is advised that conditions will be remedied. The improvements made not 
being satisfactory, still another petition was made with reference to inade- 
quate facilities and after receiving statements from defendant company as 
to the amount of revenue received at Relief, petitioners are advised that the 
Commission would not be justified in making order for the building of new 
depot and establishing agent in connection therewith. Petitioners are 
asked to let the matter rest for a few months with the hope that there will 
be an improvement in the financial conditions of carriers. Still a year 
later the matter is again taken up but the receipts of the railroad not being 
sufficient to require an order, case is dismissed. 

Citizens of Summerfield v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for better 
depot facilities. Railroad companies then being in the hands of the United 
States Railroad Administration pending the financial outcome of the railroad 
problem and not being disposed to take up matters of this kind, the peti- 
tioner was so advised. Not having had further petition, case is dismissed. 

Citizens of Franklinton v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Petition 
for new passenger facilities at Franklinton. Due to inability of defendant 
company to finance such project, not having further complaint, case is dis- 
missed. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company to the Commission. Complaint of 
crossing of telephone wires of C. A. Garris near milepost 68%, asking that 
the said crossing be put in standard condition. After having called the 
matter to the attention of Mr. Garris several times, the petitioner is given 
authority to take such action after ten days notice to the owner of the tele- 
phone line in question to remove the wires from the right of way of the 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 87 

railroad company : Provided the owner should have crossings comply with the 
rules of Commission prior to the date for removing said wires, authority 
should become ineffective. Not having had further complaint, case is closed. 

Forest City Chamber of Commerce v. Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Rail- 
way Company. Petition for erection of railway station. Having been 
advised by defendant company that they have in mind erection of a station 
and not having further complaint, case is closed. 

Citizens of Mooresville v. Southern Railway Company. Petition asking 
that defendant company be required to build a passenger station in the town 
of Mooresville. After much correspondence the matter is set for hearing. 
The Commission being advised that there is a possibility of an agreement, 
being reached, the hearing is postponed indefinitely. Being further advised 
that the station is being erected, case is closed. 

Citizens of Rex v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Petition asking 
for adequate station and an agent at said place. It appearing that volume 
of freight and revenue resulting at this station is small and will not justify 
the opening of an agency or furnishing of additional facilities, case is dis- 
missed. 

Town of Rowland v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company and Maxton, 
Alma and Southbound Railroad Company. Petition for union station. It 
appearing that there was no real demand or necessity for a union station, 
petitioners are advised that defendant companies decline to look with favor 
upon their petition. Not having further complaint from petitioners, case is 
dismissed. 

Maiden v. Carolina and Northwestern Railroad Company. Application 
for freight and passenger depot. It appearing that the freight and passenger 
depot was destroyed by fire and defendant company using old passenger car 
as passenger depot and freight car as freight depot, petition is made for 
a new building. The petitioner is advised that an order cannot be made 
without a hearing and if hearing is desired that he file formal complaint. 
Not having further advice case is closed. 

R. B. Slaughter v. Southern Railway Company. Petition asking for 
removal of depot at Topton. The petitioner advised that completion of new 
highway makes it necessary that the depot at Topton be located on the 
opposite side of railroad from its present location and, as defendant company 
is making plans for improvements on the depot, suggestion is to move same 
before improvement is made, as all goods and supplies would have to be 
hauled across the railroad, which is both dangerous and inconvenient. Be- 
fore the matter is adjusted the depot is burned and again the appeal is made 
with reference to removal and location and defendant company advises that 
same will be given careful consideration. Not having further information 
with reference to same, case is closed. 

Lee County Chamber of Commerce v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany, Seaboard Air Line Railway Company, Southern Railway Company, 
Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern 
Railroad Company, and Clyde Steamship Company. Complaint as to service 
in transportation of freight between Sanford and points in North Carolina. 
Complaint withdrawn. 



88 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application to change 
Selica to nonagency station. Authority granted to make same prepay station 
effective February 1, 1924, for test as to operation. 

Citizens of Coffield v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Application 
for depot facilities. Defendant company advises that arrangements are 
made to improve the station facilities. Case closed. 

Citizens of Meege v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Application 
for removal of depot at Center Hill. The present locality being almost 
inaccessible and having been advised by defendant company that the cost 
of removing said station would be quite expensive and the revenues would 
not be increased by the change and, inasmuch as the revenue at the point 
is quite small and the railroad not willing to voluntarily make the change, 
the Commission cannot peremptorily order same without hearing. Many 
months have elapsed without further complaint from petitioners and upon 
request for further information without response, case is dismissed. 

Yadkin Railway Company to the Commission. Application for authority 
to operate motor car between Badin and Hall's Ferry Junction. Granted. 

Citizens of Marble v. Southern Railway Company. Petition for extension 
of side track and installation of telegraph office at Marble. It appearing 
that the business at this place would not justify the establishment of a tele- 
graph office and the cause for complaint with reference to side track having 
been removed, case is closed. 

T. L. Smith v. Norfolk and Western Railway Company. Complaint of 
depot facilities at Madison, in that defendant company failed to provide 
fire in waiting-room for colored people. Adjusted. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company v. J. D. McRaney. Complaint of 
telephone wire crossing near Rex and Lumber Bridge. Petitioner is advised 
to take such action, after ten days notice to the owner of the telephone line 
as is necessary to remove said wires from the right of way of the railroad 
company : Provided, that if defendant proceeds to make the crossing com- 
ply with the standard prior to the date set for removing said wires, authority 
to become ineffective. 

Scott and Brown Lumber Company v. Norfolk and Western Railway Com- 
pany. Complaint as to cattle-guards on Abingdon Branch. Adjusted. 

Citizens of Tobaccoville and Community v. Southern Railway Company. 
Complaint of discontinuance of freight and passenger depot at Tobaccoville. 
Authority having been asked by the Southern Railway Company to close the 
agency at Tobaccoville and make it a prepay station, upon petition by the 
citizens of Tobaccoville protesting against same, petition of Southern Rail- 
way is withdrawn. 

Citizens of Millboro v. Atlantic and Yadkin Railroad Company and Western 
Union Telegraph Company. Complaint of discontinuance of telegraph office. 
Satisfactory arrangements being made for reinstating telegraph business, case 
is closed. 

Maxton, Alma and Southbound Railroad Company to the Commission. 
Application for change in schedule. Granted. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 89 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company to the Commission. Applica- 
tion for withdrawal of trains Nos. 50 and 51 and changes in trains Nos. 62 
and 63. Approved. 

Claud Ricks v. Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. Complaint of train 
service near Mackeys. Adjusted. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
change in schedules. Approved. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for change 
in schedule of trains Nos. 16 and 17. Adjusted. 

C. J. Gate and A. V. Foote v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint in 
change in schedule of train No. 3. Objection withdrawn and case closed. 

Waynesville Civic League v. Southern Railway Company. Complaint of 
unsanitary conditions at station. Adjusted. 

W. T. Hunt and Brother v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Applica- 
tion for extension of side track at East Durham. Extension granted. 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company to the Commission. Application for 
change in passenger train schedule. Approved. 

Elkin and Alleghany Railway Company to the Commission. Application 
for authority to discontinue passenger traffic. Granted temporarily. 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company v. Highway Commission. Com- 
plaint of derailment of train by reason of dirt left on track. It appearing, 
however, that the cause was not due to State highway system but to county 
authorities, it being a county road, notice is gotten out to all of the county 
highway commissioners and boards of county commissioners, calling their at- 
tention to the fact that road contractors leave loose dirt on railroad tracks at 
grade crossings, thereby causing derailment, and asking that great care be 
used in keeping these crossings clear of dirt. Closed. 

Town of Elm City v. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Petition 
asking that watchman be placed at railroad crossing at Main Street. De- 
fendant company advises that the matter will be adjusted satisfactorily to 
complainant. 

East Carolina Railway to the Commission. Application for discontinuance 
of trains. Granted. 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company to the Commission. Application to 
close agency at Reelsboro making same a prepay station. Granted. 

J. F. Taylor v. Pullman Company. Complaint of failure to secure reserva- 
tions at Greensboro after having been made. Adjusted. 

Peele and Company v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Complaint 
of condition of driveway to station. Adjusted. 

E. B. Plott v. Southern Railway System. Petition asking for removal of 
passenger waiting booth at Saunook to a more suitable location. Granted. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for change in 
name of station from Lemden to Groverstone. Granted. 



V 



90 N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 

Howard Smith v. Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Complaint of 
failure of train No. 20 to connect with train No. 2 at Hamlet. It appearing 
that No. 2 is a fast train making through connection for northern points and 
not waiting for any connections, case is dismissed. 

Southern Railway Company to the Commission. Application for discon- 
tinuance of agency at Shoals. Granted. 

C. P. Rogers v. Southern Railway Company. Application for installation 
of telephone in station at East Flat Rock. It appearing from answer of 
defendant that investigation has been made and there was no possible need 
found for telephone at said point so far as defendant company was concerned, 
case is dismissed. 

Southern Railway System to the Commission. Application for discon- 
tinuance of agency at Bullock. Granted. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT COMPANIES 

Piedmont Power and Light Company to the Commission. Adjustment of 
rates for Burlington in regard to pumping water. This matter is taken up 
for investigation and set for hearing, but the Commission being advised that 
the board of aldermen of the city of Burlington and the plaintiff had handled 
matter and arrived at an agreement, case is dismissed. 

Carolina Bagging Company v. Carolina Power and Light Company. Re- 
newal of contract for power. Adjusted. 

Columbus Light and Power Company to the Commission. Application for 
increase in rates for the town of Whiteville. Objection was made to the rate 
asked for, but after thorough investigation and hearing the following rate 
was approved by the Commission, effective March 1st : 

First 100 k.w 8.3 

Next 200 k.w 6.9 

Next 300 k.w 4.0 

Next 800 k.w 3.2 

N. C. Public Service Company to the Commission. Agreement to be used 
in serving suburban customers filed with the Commission. 

J. R. Chamberlain v. Carolina Power and Light Company. Complaint as 
to minimum charge imposed. Adjusted. 

Caldwell Power Company to the Commission. Approval of rates for 
Lenoir. The following rates are approved : 

Electric Lighting Service 

One dollar monthly minimum charge with current equal to that 
in value to be used or not. Bills payable by the tenth of month 
after. Service connection charge $1.00. 

First 50 k.w. hrs. consumed.... 10c. each 

Next 50 k.w. hrs. consumed 9c. each 

Next 100 k.w. hrs. consumed 8c. each 

Next 600 k.w. hrs. consumed 7c. each 

Next 200 k.w. hrs. consumed 6c. each 

Above 1,000 k.w. hrs. consumed 5c. each 






CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 91 

Electric Power and Fuel Service 

First 500 k.w. hrs. consumption 5.0c. each 

Next 500 k.w. hrs. consumption 4.0c. each 

Next 1,000 k.w. hrs. consumption 3.6c. each 

Next 2,000 k.w. hrs. consumption 3.1c. each 

Next 4,000 k.w. hrs. consumption 2.7c. each 

Next 8,000 k.w. hrs, consumption 2.3c. each 

Over 16,000 k.w. hrs. consumption 2.0c. each 

Minimum service charges on above rates shall be as follows : 

Electric ranges $2.50. 

$1.00 per month for each h.p. connected up to 25 h.p. 

.75 per month for each h.p. connected from 26 up to 50 h.p. 

.50 per month for each h.p. connected from 51 or over. 
Effective January 1, 1923. 

The power company desires the right to collect the sum of $3.50 from each 
customer for use of meter to be refunded the customer when he discontinues 
use of current but without interest. The said sum to be treated as security 
for the payment of bills for current, which bills may be deducted therefrom 
and the balance paid to the customer when service is discontinued. This 
charge is necessary because so many tenant customers manage to evade the 
payment of at least one month's charges unless some provision of this kind 
is made. 

Walker Brothers v. Hillsboro Power and Light Company. Complaint of 
service. It appearing that the service is cut off on account of water shortage 
and that the same would be adjusted as promptly as possible, case is closed. 

Roxboro Light and Power Company to the Commission. Application for 
reduction in electric light rates. The following rates approved and placed 
on file subject to complaint and hearing: 

Minimum $1.50 per month. 

First Block : 0-25 14 cents per k.w.h. gross 12.6 net 

Second Block : 25-50 13 cents per k.w.h. gross 11.7 net 

Third Block: 50-75 12 cents per k.w.h. gross 10.8 net 

Fourth Block : 75.100 11 cents per k.w.h. gross 9.9 net 

Over 100 10 cents per k.w.h 9.0 net 

G. C. Buquo Lime Company v. Hot Springs Lighting Company. Complaint 
of service. Investigated and adjusted. 

N. C. Public Service Company to the Commission. Application for re- 
duction of street car rates for Concord from 10 cents to 7 cents. Granted. 

Concord and Kannapolis Gas Company to the Commission. Notice of gas 
reduction for the town of Concord as follows : Beginning on March 1, 1923, 
charge for gas will be reduced 10 cents per 1,000 cubic feet, making the rate 
$2.40 gross, $2.30 net. Minimum rate, $1 per month. Closed. 

Durham Public Service Company to the Commission. Supplemental rate 
sheet reducing commercial heating applicable to heating and loads of over 
10 kilowatts. 

Rate : Three charge : 

1. A customer charge per meter per year (payable in 

equal monthly installments) $12.00 

Plus 



92 N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 

2. A connected load charge per k.w. of installed capacity 

(payable in equal monthly installments) $18.00 

Plus 

3. A consumption charge per kilowatt hour metered 02 

Discount for payment within 10 days of date of bill, 5 per cent. Minimum 
monthly bill, one-twelfth of annual customer charge plus one-twelfth of 
annual connected load charge. 

J. H. Parker and Company v. New Bern Gas and Fuel Company. Com- 
plaint of overcharge. It appearing that there is no overcharge, case is dis- 
missed. 

Home Electric Company to the Commission. Application for approval of 
schedule of rates. The following rates are approved : 

First 10 k.w. hrs. consumed ... 10c. each 

Next 25 k.w. hrs. consumed 9c. each 

Next 65 k.w. hrs. consumed 8c. each 

Next 100 k.w. hrs. consumed 7.5c. each 

Next 300 k.w. hrs. consumed 6.5c. each 

Next 400 k.w. hrs. consumed 5.5c. each 

Next 600 k.w. hrs. consumed 4.5c. each 

Next 1,000 k.w. hrs. consumed 3.5c. each 

Next 1,500 k.w. hrs. consumed 3.25c. each 

Over 4,000 k.w. hrs. consumed , 3.00c. each 

All bills shall be due and payable within ten days after notice of same, and 
if paid within ten days after notice thereof, the company agrees to allow a 
discount of 5 per cent. A charge of $1 will be made for each service con- 
nection by the company. 

Fayetteville Light and Power Company to the Commission. Reduction in 
schedule of rates for gas. The following rate is approved and effective 

May 1, 1923 : 

Net if paid 
on or before 
Gross 10th of month 

First 10,000 cu. ft $2.50 $2.40 

Second 10,000 cu. ft 2.40 2.30 

Over 20,000 cu. ft 2.30 2.20 

Minimum monthly charge, $150. 

Piedmont Power and Light Company v. Travora Manufacturing Company. 
Protest as to defendant company reselling current bought from Southern 
Power Company. The matter was satisfactorily explained and complaint 
withdrawn. 

Carolina Power and Light company to the Commission. Revised schedule 
for large combination lighting and power filed with the Commission subject 
to complaint and hearing; said schedule to apply to service for hotels and 
large office buildings contracting for 35 k.w. or over, where the power com- 
prises not less than 50 per cent of the total demand load, and service to be 
daily under provision of rules and regulations : 

Two dollars per month per contract k.w., including the use of 20 k.w.h. 
during month ; 7.5 cents per k.w.h. for the next 500 k.w.h. used during month ; 
5 cents per k.w.h. for the next 750 k.w.h. used during month ; 2.5 cents per 
k.w.h. for the excess k.w.h used during month. 

Minimum monthly guarantee, $2 net per contract k.w., and in no case shall 
service be supplied for less than $70 per month. 






CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 93 

This schedule applied to service for a period of not less than one year, 
provided that contracts for longer periods may be required where circum- 
stances justify. 

Blowing Rock Light and Power Company to the Commission. Schedule of 
rates for Blowing Rock. The following rates were approved May 7th : 

Residential Service and Commercial Lighting 

Monthly consumption Rate per k.w. 

in k.w. Ivrs. hr. in cents. 

First 50 20c. 

Next 50 18c. 

Next 200 16c. 

Next 200 14c. 

Next 500 12c. 

Next 500 10c. 

All over 1,500 8c. 

Commercial and Industrial Power 

Monthly Consumption Rate per k.w. 

in k.w. hrs. hr. in cents. 

First 100 10c. 

Next 150 9c. 

Next 250 8c. 

Next 500 7c. 

Next 1,000 6c. 

Next 2,000 5c. 

All over 4,000 4c. 

Conover Electric Company to the Commission. Application for approval 
of rates for electric current. The following rates approved : 

Lighting Rates 

Up to 100 k.w. hrs 10c. 

100 to 200 k.w. hrs 9c. 

200 to 400 k.w. hrs 8c. 

400 to 600 k.w. hrs 6c. 

600 to 1,000 k.w. hrs 4c. 

All bills paid by the 10th of each month shall be subject to discount of 5 
per cent ; bills not paid by the 30th of each month, 5 per cent shall be added. 

The consumer agrees to pay $1 minimum service charge whether current 
equal to that in value shall be used or not, subject to discount and penalty 
as above. 

Power Rates 

Up to 100 k.w. hrs 10c. 

100 to 150 k.w. hrs , 9c. 

150 to 200 k.w. hrs 8c. 

200 to 300 k.w. hrs 7c. 

300 to 400 k.w. hrs 6c. 

400 to 500 k.w. hrs 5c. 

500 to 1,000 k.w. hrs 4c. 

1,000 to 1,500 k.w. hrs 3c. 

1,500 to 2,000 k.w. hrs 2.5c. 

2,000 to 4,000 k.w. hrs 2.4c. 

4,000 to 6,000 k.w. hrs 2.3c. 

These bills are not subject to discount, or penalty, but service will be dis- 
continued when failure to pay for two months exists. 



94 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

County Service Company, Lenoir, to the Commission. Schedule of electric 
lighting, power and fuel rate for approval. The following rates approved: 

Lighting 
Minimum, $1.50. 

First 50 k.w. hrs. consumed 15c. each 

Next 50 k.w. hrs. consumed 14c. each 

Next 100 k.w. hrs. consumed 13c. each 

Next 600 k.w. hrs. consumed 12c. each 

Next 200 k.w. hrs. consumed lie. each 

Above 1,000 k.w. hrs. consumed 10c. each 

Power and Fuel 
Minimum Fuel, $3.50 
Minimum power, $1.50 per h.p. up to 25 h.p. 

First 500 k.w. hrs. consumed 7.0c. each 

Next 500 k.w. hrs. consumed 6.0c. each 

Next 1,000 k.w. hrs. consumed 4.6c. each 

Next 2,000 k.w. hrs. consumed 4.1c. each 

Next 4,000 k.w. hrs. consumed 4.7c. each 

Next 8,000 k.w. hrs. consumed 4.3c. each 

Over 16,000 k.w. hrs. consumed 4.0c. each 

No discount allowed. All bills shall be paid by the tenth of the month or 
service will be discontinued. 

N. C. Public Service Company to the Commission. Application for ap- 
proval of rates of 75 cents per h.p. minimum for the Dick Laundry Company. 
Approved effective August 1, 1923. 

Mrs. J. E. Stephens and A. L. Crane v. Carolina Power and Light Company. 
Complaint of failure to install gas fixtures in residences. After investigation 
of the matter, it appearing that charges for extending pipes and installing 
fixtures was more than complainants wished to pay, case is dismissed. 

Home Electric Company to the Commission. Application for approval of 
schedule of rates for Hendersonville. The following rates approved, effec- 
tive July 1, 1923 : 

Rate Gross Total 

First 100 k.w. hrs. consumed per month 7.5 7.50 

Next 100 to 200 k.w. hrs. consumed per month 6.5 14.00 

Next 200 to 300 k.w. hrs. consumed per month 6.0 20.00 

Next 300 to 400 k.w. hrs. consumed per month 5.0 25.00 

Next 400 to 600 k.w. hrs. consumed per month 4.0 33.00 

Next 600 to 800 k.w. hrs. consumed per month 3.0 39.00 

Over 800 k.w. hrs. consumed per month 2.0 

Minimum charge $1.00 for each h.p. connected up to 15 h.p. 
Minimum charge .75 for each h.p. connected from 15 to 30 h.p. 
Minimum charge .50 for each h.p. connected over 30 h.p. 

The minimum charge is not subject to discount. These rates to replace 
all old power schedules with four exceptions. 

Electric Sign and Window Lighting 

First hours use of installation 8c. 

Second hours use of installation 7c. 

Third hours use of installation 5c. 

Fourth hours use of installation 3^c. 

Over 4 hours use of installation '. 3c. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 95 

Minimum bill shall be one (1) hour's use of installation, except that it shall 
not be less that one dollar ($1) per month. 

Electric Cooking, Heating and Battery Service 

Rates for above service shall be four (4) cents per k.w.h. for first 250, and 
three and one half (3% ) cents for all over 250 k.w.h. 

A minimum net charge of one dollar ($1) per connected k.w. will be 
made for contracts under above rates. Bills under this rate are subject to 
a cash discount of five per cent (5%) if paid by 10th of succeeding month. 

Southern Gas Improvement Company to the Commission. Application for 
approval of gas rates for Elizabeth City and Henderson. The following rates 
are approved, effective December 1, 1923 : 

Elizabeth City : Gross Net 

First 5,000 cu. ft $2,40 $2.35 

Next 5,000 cu. ft 1.80 1.75 

Over 10,000 cu. ft 1.35 1.30 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50. 

Henderson : Gross Net 

First 5,000 cu. ft $2.50 $2.45 

Next 5,000 cu. ft 2.00 1.95 

Over 10,000 cu. ft 1.55 1.50 

Minimum monthly charge, $1.50 

Carolina Power and Light Company to the Commission. Application for 
approval of lighting rates for Franklinton and Macon, effective October 1, 
1923: 

Commercial Lighting 

12c. gross, ll%c. net per k.w.h. for first 50 k.w.h. per month 
10c. gross, 9y 2 c. net per k.w.h. for next 200 k.w.h. per month 
8c. gross, 7%c. net per k.w.h. for next 300 k.w.h. per month 
6%c. gross, 6c. net per k.w.h. for next 1,200 k.w.h. per month 
3c. gross, 3c. net per k.w.h. for all excess 
Minimum monthly charge, $1.50 net. 

Residential Lighting 

12c. gross, ll%c. net per k.w.h. first block. 
6V2C gross 6c. net pre k.w.h. for excess. 
Minimum monthly charge, $1.50 net. 

Asheville Power and Light Company to the Commission. Application for 
approval of rate for large miscellaneous power and combination large lighting 
and power rates. The following rates are approved, effective January 1, 1924 : 

Large Miscellaneous Power 

One dollar and fifty cents net per contract h.p. each month, which $1.50 
entitled consumer to use during such month 20 k.w.h ; 4 cents net per k.w.h. 
for the next 1,500 k.w.h. used per month ; 2 cents net per k.w.h. for the next 
1,500 k.w.h. used per month; 1.5 cents net per k.w.h. for the excess of the 
above stated amounts. 



yb N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Combination Large Lighting and Power 

Two dollars net per contract k.w. each month, which $2 entitled consumer 
to use during such month 20 k.w.h ; 5 cents net per k.w.h. for the next 1,000 
k.w.h. used per month ; 3 cents net per k.w.h. for the next 1.000 k.w.h. used 
per month; 1.5 cents net per k.w.h. for the excess of above stated amounts. 

Carolina Power and Light Company to the Commission. Application for 
increase in gas rates for Durham and Raleigh. The matter was taken up for 
investigation, and before this case is decided on, the question of reduction in 
gas rates for all of the public service companies is taken up by the Commis- 
sion and order made covering all points, including Raleigh and Durham. 
Closed. 

Tidewater Power Company to the Commission. Schedule of rates for 
school children. The following rate's approved effective October 1, 1923 : 

Wrightsville Beach school children's commutation book, 26 round trips, sold 
under contract for use within 40 days by children up to 18 years of age, good 
only on school days, from 27 cents round trip ($7.02 for the book) to 25 cents 
round trip ($6.50 for the book). 

Round-trip school children's tickets, Wrightsville Sound and Sea Gate to 
Wilmington and return, sold in single tickets, good only on school days and 
for children up to 18 years of age, from 18 cents round trip to 16 cents round 
trip. 

School children's tickets from Winter Park to Wilmington, good only on 
school days, children up to 18 years of age, from 14 cents round trip to 6% 
cents each way, using metal tokens at the 15-for-a-dollar rate. 

North Carolina Electrical Power Company to the Commission. Application 
for approval of power rates. The following rates approved : 

Large Miscellaneous Power 

One dollar and fifty cents net per contract h.p. each month, which $1.50 
entitles consumer to use during such month 25 k.w.h. ; 4 cents net per k.w.h. 
for the next 1,500 k.w.h. used per month ; 2 cents net per k.w.h. for the next 
1,500 k.w.h. used per month ; 1% cents per k.w.h. for the excess of the above 
stated amounts. 

Small Miscellaneous Power 

This schedule is applicable for small miscellaneous power service for which 
no specific schedule is provided. 

One dollar per contract h.p. each month, which $1 entitles consumer to 
use during such month 12 k.w.h. ; 7 cents per k.w.h. for the next 10 k.w.h. 
used per month per contract h.p. ; 5 cents per k.w.h. for the next 500 k.w.h. 
used per month ; 3 cents per k.w.h. for the excess of above stated amounts. 

On all bills paid within ten days from the date thereof, there will be allowed 
a discount of 5 per cent on the first $1 of monthly bill and 2 per cent on the 
balance thereof. 

No monthly bill will be rendered for an amont less than $1 net per contract 
h.p., and in no case shall service be supplied under this schedule for less 
than $2 per month. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 97 

This schedule applies to service for a period of not less than one year, 
provided that contracts for longer periods may be required where circum- 
stances justify. 

Laege Miscellaneous Power 

This schedule is applicable to the service described below for large miscel- 
laneous power consumers for which no specific schedule is provided from the 
company's most available 6,600-volt line, under contracts for 50 h.p. or over. 

One dollar and fifty cents net per contract h.p. each month, which $1.50 
entitles consumer to use durng such month 25 k.w.h. ; 4 cents net per k.w.h. 
for the next 1,500 k.w.h. used per month ; 2 cents net per k.w.h. for the next 
1,500 k.w.h. used per month; 1% cents net per k.w.h. for the excess of the 
above stated amounts. 

Consumers guarantee to company a revenue of at least $20 net per con- 
tract h.p. per year. 

The contract h.p. under this schedule shall be the contract demand as 
determined under the provisions of Rule No. 4 or the attached Rules and 
Regulations. 

This schedule applies to service for a period of not less than one year, 
provided that contracts for longer periods may be required where circum- 
stances justify. 

Grist and Flour Mill Service 

This schedule is applicable to the service described below for grist and flour 
mill consumers under contracts for 50 h.p. or over. 

One dollar and fifty cents net per contract h.p. per month, which $1.50 en- 
titles consumer to use during such month 45 k.w.h. ; 2 cents net per k.w.h. 
for the next 2,000 k.w.h. used per month ; 1.5 cents net per k.w.h. for the 
next 5,000 k.w.h. used per month ; 1 Scents net per k.w.h. for the excess of 
above stated amounts. 

Consumer guarantees to company a revenue of at least $20 net per contract 
h.p. per year. 

The contract h.p. under this schedule shall be the contract demand as deter- 
mined under the provisons of Rule No. 4 of the attached Rules and Regula- 
tions. 

This schedule applies to service for a period of not less than one year, pro- 
vided that contracts for longer periods may be required where circumstances 
justify. 

Herman Brown v. Southern Public Utilities Company. Complaint of ex- 
cessive gas bill. Adjusted. 

Smitherman Power Company to the Commission. Application for approval 
of electric light and power rates. The following rate approved, effective March 
1, 1924. 

Small Miscellaneous Power 

Discounts mentioned below are available only to those customers paying 
their bills on or before ten days from date of billing card for the immediately 
previous month. 

Minimum monthly lighting charge shall be $1.25 less 5 per cent discount, 
and shall entitle customer to use 10 kilowatt hours. 

Part 1—7 



yo N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Minimum monthly charge for one-half and three-quarter horsepower motors 
$1 less 5 per cent discount, one to one and one-half horsepower motors $2 per 
month less 5 per cent, and shall entitle customer to use eight and sixteen k.w.h. 
per month respectively. 

to 10 k.w. hrs. at 12%c., less 5 per cent discount. 
Next 25 k.w. hrs. at 12 %c, less 10 per cent discount. 
Next 50 k.w. hrs. at 12%c, less 15 per cent discount. 
Next 100 k.w. hrs. at 12%c, less 20 per cent discount. 
Next 200 k.w. hrs. at 12 y 2 c, less 33% per cent discount. 

All over a monthly consumption of 385 k.w.h. at 12% cents less 50 per cent 
discount. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Application for approval 
of cooking rates for towns served by defendant company north of Rocky 
Point. The following rates approved : For first 100 k.w. consumption per 
month 5% cents per k.w. Current in excess of 100 k.w. the same month 5 
cents per k.w. A minimum bill of $3 per each cooking meter will be required. 
All of the above subject to a 5 per cent discount if paid within ten days from 
the date of the bill. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Application for approval 
of electric rates for Kenansville. The following rates approved : 

Lighting for Residences and Stores. Cooking, Etc. 

First 25 k.w.h ." 12%c. 

Next 75 k.w.h 10c. 

Next 200 k.w.h 6c. 

Next 200 k.w.h 5c. 

Excess 4c. 

There will be a minimum bill of $1.50 per month for lighting and $1.50 
per month plus 50 cents per kilowatt for electric range for cooking. Contract 
period for this service would be one year or more. There would be a dis- 
count of 5 per cent for payment of the bills ten days after date of presenta- 
tion. 

Commercial Power 

First 20 k.w.h per h.p. of connected load 7c. 

Next 60 k.w.h. per h.p. of connected load 6c. 

Excess 3c. 

There would be a minimum bill of $1.50 per h.p. per month. There would be 
a discount of 5 per cent for payment within 10 days after presentation of 
bills. 

Industrial Power 

First 40 k.w.h. per k.w. of load 6c. 

Next 5,000 k.w.h. per k.w. of load 4c. 

Excess 2c. 

The last mentioned step in this rate of 2 cents would be further subject 
to adjustment depending upon the cost of coal delivered at the Wilmington 






CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 99 

plant of our company. The above rate of 2 cents would apply when coal 
cost $4.50 f.o.b. our plant and would be increased or decreased % of a mill 
for each 10 cents increase or decrease above or below the above mentioned 
cost of $4.50 per ton. The minimum bill for this service would be $1.25 per 
h.p. of connected load per month. There would be a prompt payment dis- 
count of 5 per cent for payment within 10 days after presentation of bill. 
The contract period would be for three years or more. Applicable to 100 h.p. 
and over. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Application for approval 
of fertilizer rate schedule. Approved. 

Brevard Light and Power Company to the Commission. Application for 
approval of rates for power service. The following rates approved : 

Up to 250 k.w.h 0775 cents each 

250 to 500 k.w.h 0675 cents each 

500 to 750 k.w.h 0575 cents each 

750 to 1,000 k.w.h 0445 cents each 

1,000 to 1.500 k.w.h 0373 cents each 

2,000 to 3,000 k.w.h 0318 cents each 

3,000 to 4,000 k.w.h 0296 cents each 

4,000 to 5,000 k.w.h 0283 cents each 

5,000 to 10,000 k.w.h 0248 cents each 

10,000 to 20,000 k.w.h 0233 cents each 

20,000 to 30,000 k.w.h .0221 cents each 

30,000 to 40,000 k.w.h 0210 cents each 

40,000 to 50,000 k.w.h 0200 cents each 

50,000 to 100,000 k.w.h , .0191 cents each 

100,000 to 200,000 k.w.h 0183 cents each 

200,000 to 300,000 k.w.h 0176 cents each 

300,000 to 400,000 k.w.h 0170 cents each 

400,000 to 500,000 k.w.h 0165 cents each 

All over 500,000 k.w.h 0160 cents each 



Carolina Power and Light Company and Yadkin River Power Company to 
the Commission. Application for approval of oil mill rates. The following 
rates approved effective February 1, 1924 : 

One dollar and fifty cents net per contract h.p., which $1.50 entitles con- 
sumer to use during such month 30 k.w.h. for each of the first 100 contract 
h.p. and 75 k.w.h. for each h.p. in excess of the first 100 contract h.p. 

Oil Mill Service 

1.50 cents net per k.w.h. for the next 20,000 k.w.h. used per month 
1.00 cents net per k.w.h for excess of above stated amounts. 

Consumer guarantees to company a revenue of not less than $18 net per 
contract h.p. per said "season" and the settlement for said guarantee shall 
be made upon termination of said "season." 

Home Electric Company to the Commission. Application for approval of 
revised rate for battery charging, refrigeration, cooking and heating. The 
following rate approved : 

First 50 k.w. hrs 4.0c. each 

Next 150 k.w. hrs 3.5c. each 

Next 200 k.w. hrs 3.0c. each 

Next 400 k.w. hrs 2.5c. each 

Over 800 k.w. hrs 2.0c. each 



100 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

The net minimum monthly bill under this rate shall be based on demand 
of appliances installed and in no case less than two dollars and fifty cents 
($2.50) for range or water tank heater. (This rate available only when on 
special meter.) 

All bills shall be due and payable within ten days after notice of same, 
and if paid within ten days after notice thereof, the company agrees to allow 
a discount of five (5%) per cent. 

• 
Ice Plant Service 

One dollar and fifty cents net per contract h.p. each month, which $1.50 
entitles consumer to use during such month 30 k.w.h. for each of the first 
100 contract h.p. and 75 k.w.h. for each h.p. in excess of 100 contract h.p. ; 1.50 
cents net per k.w.h. for the next 10,000 k.w.h. ; 1 cent net per k.w.h. for the 
excess of above stated amounts. 

Cotton Ginnery Season Service 

One dollar per contract h.p. each month, which $1 entitles consumer to use 
during such months 15 k.w.h. : 5 cents per k.w.h. for the next 4,000 k.w.h. used 
per month ; 3 cents per k.w.h. for the next 10,000 k.w.h. used per month ; 2 
cents per k.w.h. for the excess of above stated amounts. 

Roanoke Rapids Power Company to the Commission. Schedule of rates 
filed for approval for light, heat and power. The following rates approved : 

General Service 

Per k.w.h. 

First 100 k.w.h. monthly consumption $0.10 

Next 150 k.w.h. monthly consumption 07 

Next 750 k.w.h. monthly consumption...., 05 

Next 4,000 k.w.h. monthly consumption 04 

Excess over 5,000 k.w.h. monthly consumption 035 

Net minimum charge for electrical service under this rate. Residence: 
$1 per month net for each meter. 

Power 

First 5 h.p $1.00 per h.p. per month 

Next 25 h.p 80 per h.p. per month 

Next 30 h.p 65 per h.p. per month 

Next 40 h.p 50 per h.p. per month 

Over 100 h.p 40 per h.p. per month 

Light 

First 5 k.w $1.00 per k.w. per month 

Next 25 k.w 80 per k.w. per month 

Next 30 k.w 65 per k.w. per month 

Next 40 k.w 50 per k.w. per month 

Over 100 k.w 40 per k.w. per month 

But no bill shall be less than $1 net per month for each meter. A dis- 
count of 10 per cent will be allowed when primary service is furnished, and 
when no transformers, labor or material are furnished by the company. 

When any bill covering service for the previous month is paid at the com- 
pany's office within ten days after date of presentation of bill, a discount of 
10 per cent will be allowed. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 101 

Wholesale Industrial Power Schedule 

First 25 k.w. or less, of demand, $50 per month ; next 25 k.w. of demand 
$1.50 per k.w. per month ; over 50 k.w. of demand $1.25 per k.w. per month. 

The above demands shall be taken in accordance with the company's stand- 
ard method of fixing demands. In addition to the demand charges above 
specified, a meter rate will be charged for electricity consumed as follows: 

First 1,000 k.w.h. consumed per month $0.03 

Next 4,000 k.w.h. consumed per month 025 

Next 10,000 k.w.h. consumed per month ,02 

Next 35,000 k.w.h. consumed per month , 015 

Excess over 50,000 k.w.h. consumed per month 0125 

If a minimum demand of 50 k.w. is paid for under a contract for three 
years the first 10,000 k.w.h. of monthly consumption will be charged for at the 
rate of .02 per k.w.h., the next 40,000 k.w.h. will be charged for at the rate 
of .015 per k.w.h. 

A discount of 10 per cent will be allowed on both demand charge and 
energy charge when primary service is furnished and when no transformers, 
labor or material are furnished by the company. 

When any bill covering service for the previous month is paid at the com- 
pany's office within ten days after date of presentation of bill, a discount of 
10 per cent will be allowed on both demand charge and energy charge. 

Heating, Cooking, Refrigeration and Storage Battery Charging 

First 700 k.w.h. monthly consumption $0.06 

Next 1,500 k.w.h. monthly consumption ,.. .04 

Next 7,800 k.w.h. monthly consumption 035 

Excess over 15,000 k.w.h. monthly consumption 03 

The guaranteed monthly kilowatt-hour consumption to equal thirty hours' 
use of the demand. 

Subject to a discount of 10 per cent when primary service is furnished, and 
when no transformers, labor or material is furnished by the company. 

Ten per cent discount if paid at the company's office within ten days after 
date of presentation of bill. 

H. M. McKethan v. Fayetteville Light and Power Company. Complaint of 
additional charges on prepay gas meter. Adjusted. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Reduction in electric 
range rates filed with the Commission subject to complaint and hearing: 

Five cents per kilowatt hour for first one hundred kilowatt hours ; 4 cents 
for all current in excess of same; $1.40 minimum monthly charge per k.w. 
connected load for a minimum of not less than 2 k.w., namely $2.80. The 
above subject to 5 per cent discount paid within ten days. 

Fred Beale v. Asheville Power and Light Company. Complaint of charge. 
Adjusted. 

Tide Water Power Company to the Commission. Reduction in school 
children's transportation. Approved. 



102 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EXPRESS COMPANIES 

R. N. Simms v. American Railway Express Company and Southeastern 
Express Company. Application for extension of delivery limits. Granted. 

Citizens of High Rock v. American Railway Express Company. Defendant 
company proposed discontinuance of its agency at High Rock. Petition is 
filed protesting same. It appearing that the business at this point is not 
profitable, and defendant company being advised that arrangements are to be 
made with the railroad company to take care of shipments by carrying them 
to or from the nearest express station. Case closed. 

Citizens of Judson v. Southeastern Express Company. Application for 
establishment of office. Granted. 

Anderson Mills v. American Railway Express Company and Southeastern 
Express Company. Complaint of discontinuance of delivery of express at Lin- 
colnton. It appearing that location of complainant is outside of delivery lim-' 
its, but the custom has been established for years to deliver and call for ex- 
press, and the matter presented a point over which the Commission had no 
authority to order without hearing, defendant companies are requested in an 
informal way to furnish service. This request not being complied with, the 
matter is set for hearing, but the complainant not desiring to go to the expense 
and time for hearing, case is dismissed 

State School for Blind v. Southeastern Express Company. Petition for de- 
livery of express to State School for Blind, this institution having moved 
into new building outside of the old city limits. Petition granted. 

Hart Cotton Mills v. American Railway Express Company. Petition for 
extension of delivery limits at Tarboro. Petition granted. 

City of Raleigh to the Commission. Petition asking for extension of express, 
telegraph and telephone service. Granted. 

Enfield Chamber of Commerce v. American Railway Express Company. 
Complaint of removal of office from good quarters in hotel building to baggage 
room of Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. Upon investigation, an 
agreement is reached to hold the matter in abeyance until spring when the 
street will be put in good condition and the express office can be placed at its 
former location. Closed. 

Roxboro Chamber of Commerce v. American Railway Express Company. 
Application for establishment of free delivery service. After investigation 
the matter is set for hearing and after conference the case is dismissed. 

American Railway Express Company to the Commission. Application to 
close agency at Waco. Notice was posted with reference to closing of agency 
and time having expired before petition was filed protesting against same, 
the Commission advised complainant that office had been closed and re- 
quested that the petitioner file a copy of each month's business showing 
revenue and expenses for the year. Having no further complaint, case is 
closed. 

American Railway Express Company to the Commission. Petition to close 
express office at Hallison. Upon request by citizens of Hallison and High 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 103 

Falls to petitioner to allow the office to remain open with their assurances 
that business would be better in the future, the petitioner asked that its 
application be disregarded. Case closed. 

Southeastern Express Company to the Commission. Application for dis- 
continuance of motor truck service between Goldsboro, LaGrange and Kinston, 
and also to close its offices at Kinston and LaGrange. Granted. 

Town of Newland v. American Railway Express Company. Petition for 
establishment of express service on Linville River Railroad. After investiga- 
tion defendant company advises that it does not operate over the line of 
road on which Newland is located and has no physical connection with same 
and is of the opinion that if express service is extended over these lines it 
should be by the Southeastern, which expected to start operation soon. Not 
having further complaint, the case is closed. 

STEAMBOAT LINES 

R. C. Caviness v. Albemarle Steam Navigation Company. Petition from 
people of Gatesville desiring that boat line be established from Tunis, a 
point on Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, to Gatesville for the purpose of 
hauling freight between these points. Defendant company states intention 
of resuming steamer service and suggests a conference with the parties 
interested. Not hearing further from complainant, case is dismissed. 

M. E. Evans v. Cashie River Line. Complaint of discrimination against 
landing as to receiving and delivering freight. Adjusted. 

TELEGRAPH COMPANIES 

Town of Newland v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Application for 
telegraph office. Defendant company replies that it has no wires at New- 
land and all telegrams to and from that point are handled by telephone 
through Cranberry office, service perfectly satisfactory. On account of the 
very small amount of business, which would not justify the expense, and the 
various communities being satisfactorily served, petition is dismissed. 

Town of Graham v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Petition asking 
for establishment of telegraph office. Representative of defendant company 
appears before the Commission and advise that arrangements had been made 
to put in direct telephone connection from Burlington to Graham. There be- 
ing no further complaint, case is closed. 

Ernaldson Cotton Mill Company v. Western Union Telegraph Company, 
Postal Telegraph Company and Virginia and Carolina Southern Railway 
Company. Application for establishment of office at St. Paul. Defendant 
Western Union Telegraph Company stated it has no facilities entering St. 
Paul, and after conference with the Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad 
Company with a view to effecting contract, Commission finds that the terms 
under which such arrangements would be acceptable to railroad company 
would make the proposition prohibitive as telegraph receipts on business would 
not justify same. Matter adjusted by defendants Postal Telegraph Cable Com- 
pany and Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Company. 



104 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Citizens of Norman v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Petition for re- 
storation of telegraph office at Norman. It appearing that the expense of 
maintaining office would not justify restoration of same, case is dismissed. 

Citizens of Stokes v. Western Union Telegraph Company and Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad Company. Petition for establishment of office. It ap- 
pearing that the business received at this point would not justify an office, and 
the messages being handled by telephone to this point, case is dismissed. 

Washington Chamber of Commerce v. Western Union Telegraph Company, 
This is message asking for information as to the defendant company's activity 
in regard to transporting negro labor North. Advice is obtained from the 
Attorney-General that there is no statute prohibiting soliciting labor but 
permits same when tax is paid. Investigation and prosecution of such viola- 
tions not being a matter for local authorities and not within the jurisdiction 
of this office, case is dismissed. 

L. D. Grady v. Western Union Telegraph Company. Petition for establish- 
ment of office at Turkey. It appearing that the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
Company, on which line Turkey is located, has no need for office from the 
railroad standpoint and the people at Turkey being served by telephone 
through office at Clinton and the revenue received from said point not being 
sufficient to justify the expense of operating office, petition is dismissed. 

Hamlet Chamber of Commerce v. Western Union Telegraph Company. 
Petition asking for change in location of office at Hamlet to a more convenient, 
as well as safer place in the business district. 

Defendant company advises that its office is centrally located and it is of 
the opinion that all interests at Hamlet could be best served at the present 
location, therefore, it cannot subscribe to the contrary views of the town of 
Hamlet. The petitioners are so advised and having no further complaint, case 
is closed. 

Plymouth Chamber of Commerce v. Western Union Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of unsatisfactory service in that the office closes at 4 :15 p.m. and 
there is no telegraph service until 7 or 8 a.m. Defendant company advises 
that the matter of lengthening the hours of service is being handled with the 
railroad company with a view to relieving the situation. Having no further 
complaint, case is closed. 

Western Union Telegraph Company to the Commission. Notice of establish- 
ment of service at McFarlan. McFarlan not being an established telegraph 
point on the railroad and having an agent who is a Morse operator who 
has agreed upon request of the public to handle commercial telegraphic busi- 
ness on the usual basis existing at regular established points, the petitioner 
asks in establishing this office to be permitted to discontinue same in the 
event it might be found necessary to replace present agent with an agent 
who is not a Morse operator. The Commission advises that such arrangement 
will be satisfactory. Case closed. 

TELEPHONE COMPANIES 

Citizens of Rowan County and Subscribers of the Lowerstone Telephone 
Company to the Commission. Connection of Rockwell Mutual Telephone 
Company and Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company in order to 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 105 

furnish and provide proper, efficient, uniform and adequate service and rates. 
It appearing that the Farmers Mutual Telephone Company had filed with the 
Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company petitions asking for connec- 
tion in order to get service and this connection refused on the ground that 
the Lowerstone Telephone Company was doing business from said town, 
petition is filed by subscribers of the Lowerstone Telephone Company for con- 
nection with Farmers Mutual Company and Southern Bell Telephone and 
Telegraph Company. Respondent Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company in its reply states that it is willing to give service over its lines 
under proper agreement and conditions of patrons of petitioner, provided 
lines of petitioner are connected with lines of said Lowerstone Telephone 
Company with consent of said latter company. It appearing that the Lower- 
stone Telephone Company makes offer to the Rockwell Mutual Telephone 
Company to connect its lines with the lines of the Lowerstone Telephone 
Company at Rockwell and furnish through said connection same toll line 
service furnished its own subscribers, to be paid the regular toll rates charged 
by the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company for such service 
plus twenty per cent for reimbursement for cost of trunk line connecting the 
Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company and for collecting and 
accounting such business. Agreement is reached and accepted and the Rock- 
well Mutual Company withdraws its petition as against the Southern Bell 
Telephone and Telegraph Company. The matter was set for hearing and it 
was decided that the Commission could not compel this connection to be made, 
under decision of Supreme Court. Dismissed. 

T. M. Marshburn v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company v. Williamston Telephone 
Company. Failure to pay proportionate tolls. Defendant company advised 
that unless matter is adjusted within ten days the Commission would of neces- 
sity have to take action. Nothing further having been heard from complain- 
ant, case is dismissed. 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company v. Z. R. Davis. Complaint of 
failure to collect toll charges. It appearing that the matter of disconnecting 
the Lucama Exchange on account of nonpayment of an account by Mr. Davis 
had been brought to the attention of the Commission and defendant authorized 
to take such action in the premises as was expedient, provided in the event 
connection was severed a pay-station at this exchange would be established 
for communication between the people of the community and other com- 
munities by long distance. The Commission was under the impression that 
the matter had been adjusted. Case is now reopened and defendant advised 
that ten days would be given for a reply. No reply having been received, 
the complainant is again given authority to disconnect lines with same under- 
standing as to long-distance service. 

L. J. Mills Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of service furnished by defendant company. It appearing that 
complainant was using phone installed in name of another party, suggestion 
is made that formal application be made for service, after which defendant 
company agrees to furnish dependable service. Dismissed. 



106 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Stantonsburg Telephone Company to the Commission. Approval of rate for 
toll service on all lines on an air line mileage basis from Stantonsburg to 
Farmville and from Fountain to Greenville and Wilson as follows : 

From 1 to 12 miles , ,.. 10 cents 

From 12 to 18 miles 15 cents 

From 18 to 24 miles , 20 cents 

From 24 to 32 miles 25 cents 

Rate based on three-minute period and 5 cents for each additional minute 
or fraction thereof. Approved. 

W. J. Bridgers v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone in residence. Defendant company 
advises that service can be furnished as soon as facilities could be obtained. 
Not having had further complaint it is presumed the matter is adjusted. 

Franklin Telephone and Electric Company to the Commission. Application 
for approval of toll rates in Macon County as follows : Tolls for connection 
within a radius of 2% miles of Franklin Exchange, 15 cents for each connec- 
tion. All other tolls on longer lines with connections to Dillard, Ga., sub- 
scribers 25 cents for each connection, these rates to apply to nonsubscribers 
only. 

J. M. Brinkley v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure of defendant company to install telephone. The Commission 
is advised by defendant that appropriation for extension of telephone facili- 
ties for current year being exhausted at that time, but that appropriation for 
the coming year 1923 would soon be available and it was the purpose of the 
company to furnish the desired service as soon as possible. No further 
complaint having been received it is presumed telephone has been installed. 

W. J. Rasberry v. Home Telephone Company. Complaint of telephone ser- 
vice. Defendant company advises that delay in furnishing services is due to 
stoppage of work by agreement between the Electric Light Committee of the 
town council and manager in order to have engineer look into the situation to 
determine as to whether or not poles should be removed from the main 
street but will be given prompt attention as soon as decision could be rendered. 
No further complaint being made, case is closed. 

John A. Barringer v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

T. T. Thorn v. Home Telephone Company. Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

W. S. Cowan v. Bertie Telephone Company. Complaint of service. Ad- 
justed. 

P. P. Cover and Sons, Inc., v. Andrews Telephone Company. Complaint 
of service. Defendant company advises that it contemplates improving ser- 
vice at an early date. No further complaint being made, case is closed. 

Collins and Luper v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of delay in installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Oliver D. Revell v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of delay in installation of telephone. Defendant company in its 
answer that under conditions the demands for telephones had been more than 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 107 

the appropriation for such purpose would take care of, but as new appropria- 
tion would be available soon, complainant would then be furnished desired 
service. 

J. Scott Thompson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone in residence. It appearing that there 
was delay in installing phone, due to materials appropriated for this section 
of Raleigh having been used, but that phone was installed, case is closed. 

S. J. Biggers v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Smith and O'Brien v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company v. B. W. Leavitt. This applica- 
tion for authority to sever connection with Aberdeen and Southern Pines due 
to failure in obtaining statement of accounts. It appearing that there was 
delay in making settlement of accounts due to service, but complainant and 
defendant having adjusted same, case is closed. 

V. B. Sharpe v. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint of 
deposit of $50 for one month in advance for toll charges from business and 
residence phones. Defendant company is advised that it is the opinion of the 
Commission that complainant should be given long-distance service, provided 
there was sufficient deposit to cover any reasonable call, and that a deposit of 
$5 from time to time should answer the requirement. Adjusted. 

T. L. Cashwell v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installing telephone. Adjusted. 

Green's Pharmacy v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Defendant company replies that 
due to the great demand upon supplies of cable there would be necessary 
delay in installing telephone and every effort would be used to handle instal- 
lation with dispatch. Adjusted. 

H. Lucas v. Roseboro and Fayetteville Telephone Company. Complaint 
of service. It appearing that phone was disconnected on account of failure 
of complainant to pay in advance. Adjusted. 

A. H. Rohleder, Jr., v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of delay in installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Bald Mountain Quarries v. Lexington Telephone Company. Complaint of 
long-distance service from Denton to Lexington. High Point and Salisbury. 
It appearing that the toll service is accomplished by local subscribers being 
equipped with "electric machine switch devices" which establishes a connec- 
tion with the lines without assistance of an operator and defendant company 
not being responsible for service referred to, case is dismissed. 

N. S. Goode v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure to transfer telephone from one location in city to another. 
It appearing that the delay is due to necessary delay of defendant company 
to receive material for making the transfer but with assurances that same 
will be given attention as early as possible, case is closed. 



108 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

D. N. Hire v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 

. tion for installation of telephone in residence. Delay in installation of phone 

being due to lack of facilities but with assurances that the matter will be 

handled with dispatch and, no further complaint being filed, the Commission 

concludes matter is adjusted. 

George L. Belk v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

C. G. Dunn v. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint of 
service. Adjusted. 

W. R. Riser v. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. Application for 
installation of telephone. Adjusted. 

B. F. Mutch v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for installation of telephone and complaint of delay in receiving same. 
Telephone installed. 

Randolph Telephone Company v. Smitherman Power Company. Complaint 
as to manner of installation of high-powered electric wires in and around 
the towns of Ramseur and Franklinville. The attention of defendant com- 
pany is called to the clearance rules of the National Electric Railway Safety 
Code, to which this Commission conforms, and the Commission is advised that 
every effort possible will be made to comply with such rules and regulations. 
Case is closed. 

Mrs. H. L. Owen v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Complaint of delay in installing phone. 
Phone installed. 

N. C. College for Women v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of delay in installation of telephone. It appearing that 
the delay is due to funds not being available to carry on the budget to take 
cafe of same, but with assurances that same would be taken care of and 
phone installed, case is closed. 

D. A. Holtzclaw v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of failure to secure telephone connection at new address. Tele- 
phone installed. 

Washington Chamber of Commerce v. Washington and Hyde County Tele- 
phone Company. Complaint of poor service and also lack of service on lines 
between Washington and Belhaven and Swan Quarter. Telephone installed. 
Not having any further complaint of service, case is dismissed. 

Mesdames Jenkins and Jones v. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Request that defendant company render separate telephone bills. Request 
granted. 

Town of Littleton v. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of unsatisfactory service. Cable repairs made. No further complaint 
having been filed, case is closed. 

R. C. Shelton v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installation of telephone. Defendant company advises 
phone will be installed in a few days. Case closed. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 109 

D. McCochrane v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for telephone. Delay to install telephone being due to the unusual 
demand for service and insufficient funds to take care of budget, but with 
assurance that phone will be installed later, case is dismissed. 

O. L. Jones v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installation of phone. Defendant company advises that 
phone will be installed in about 30 days, delay being due to a considerable 
amount of work and expenditure involved in putting in and splicing under- 
ground cables. 

J. R. Edwards v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installation of telephone. Commission is advised that 
phone will be installed. Case is closed. 

Dr. Frank Wilkins v. Rutherfordton Telephone Company. Complaint of 
refusal of company to furnish long-distance service. Defendant company 
is advised that if complainant is a subscriber he should be furnished service 
and that repetition of refusal to do so would probably cause company to 
incur penalty. Not having further complaint case is closed. 

Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph Company v. Rutherfordton Telephone 
Company. Complaint of failure of defendant company to make payment of 
monthly bills for long-distance service. Adjusted. 

Hyde County Land and Lumber Company v. Hyde County Telephone Com- 
pany. Complaint of increase in rates for service without notice. The follow- 
ing rates filed with and approved with consent of all parties concerned, 
effective July 1, 1923 : 

Business phone , $2.50 per month 

Residence phone 1.50 per month 

A. S. Kennickell, Jr., v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for straight line telephone and complaint of delay in securing 
same. Telephone installed and case closed. 

E. S. Chesson v. Norfolk and Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company 
and Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint of over- 
charge on long-distance message. It appearing that there is no overcharge, 
case is dismissed. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Notice 
of change in exchange at Apex due to complaint as to making proposed change 
in central office. Telephone Company finding it more desirable to locate 
central office in residences in small towns rather than in commercial buildings, 
thereby being enabled to give better and more dependable service, especially 
at night, and no further objections being made, case is closed. 

R. S. Koonce v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed, case closed. 

Building Supplies Corporation v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Application for private line telephone and complaint of delay 
in securing same. The matter is investigated and no further complaint having 
been received, it is presumed service has been given. 



110 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

City Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for approval of 
rates for Southern Pines and Vass. The matter is taken up with the towns 
and resolution is adopted by the town of Southern Pines granting the in- 
crease temporarily with the understanding that the service is to be materially 
improved, and if, at the expiration of 90 days, service is materially improved, 
the increase in the rates is to be made permanent. There being no further 
complaint, case is closed. 

A. F. Duckett v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone and complaint of delay in securing 
same. Telephone installed. 

E. H. McCorkle v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Max Fagan v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Dr. C. F. Harris v. W. R. Huff, owner telephone exchange. Complaint of 
service, the exchange having been closed. It appearing that the exchange 
was leased and the lessor having given up the exchange without notice and 
operator and lineman being hired to carry on the exchange and a sufficient 
return not being realized to meet the expenses necessary, the exchange is 
closed. However, defendant advises that exchange will be reopened at an 
early date. Case closed. 

A. F. Kersting v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation. Phone installed. 

Piedmont Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Applica- 
tion for increase in rates for Shelby. It appears that under date of August 
14, 1919, rates were approved as follows : 

Unlimited special line business stations $3.50 per month 

Unlimited duplex liiue business stations 3.00 per month 

Unlimited special line residence stations 2.00 per month 

Unlimited duplex line residence stations 1.50 per month 

It appearing that the company has passed the 600-station mark at Shelby, 
which automatically increased the special line and duplex line business 
stations from $3.00 and $2.50 per month to $3.50 and $3.00 per month, respec- 
tively, on and after December 1, 1923, the increase of 50 cents per month 
in the business rate on special line and duplex line business stations is 
approved by the Commission. 

J. R. McQuown v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Appli- 
cation for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

T. J. McPherson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Franklin Telephone and Electric Company to the Commission. Applica- 
tion for establishment of toll rates in Macon County. Objection is made by 
the town to the proposed rates and after much correspondence a visit was 
made by one of the Commissioners to Franklin and the understanding was 
that the matter would be satisfactorily arranged. A letter is addressed to 
petitioner and defendant asking for advice and having no reply or further 
complaint, case is dismissed. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 111 

A. C. Dunn v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure to move telephone to residence. New telephone installed. 

A. H. Stenger v. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complaint of 
failure to install telephone. Phone installed. 

J. G. Cochran v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure to install telephone. It appears that the delay was due to 
lack of facilities and delay in placing the cable, but with information from 
the defendant company that phone would be installed as early as possible. 
However, Commission is advised that on account of death of petitioner, and 
his wife not desiring telephone, case is closed. 

0. W. Parham v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installing telephone. Information that delay is due to lack 
of facilities but that the matter will be given attention as soon as possible 
and not having further complaint, case is closed. 

C. F. Dacy v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installation of telephone. Information that delay is due 
to lack of facilities but that the matter will be given attention as soon as 
possible, and not having further complaint, case is closed. 

1. L. Humphrey v. Onslow Telephone Company. Application for telephone 
service for Folkstone. It appearing that the defendant company when first 
constructed had put in a few rural lines but found they were not able to 
maintain them at the rate they were charging and suggested that if sub- 
scribers wanting phones would take care of the expenses by furnishing wire, 
insulator, brackets and assist in building the line to exchange at Jacksonville, 
they could be taken care of. The Commission advises complainant that it 
has no power to compel a telephone company to increase its capital expendi- 
tures, and extends its jurisdiction only to service and rates on lin&s already 
built with the suggestion that if the Folkstone people could guarantee a 
sufficient amount of business it would no doubt be to the interest of the 
telephone company to run line to that point. Having no further advice, case 
is closed. 

Mecklenburg Industrial Home v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Installation of service. It appearing that the service desired is 
installation of phone in the Industrial Home, which is located eight miles 
from Charlotte, and that the service rendered will not permit additional wires 
put on the poles because of the impairment of transmission, and that Commis- 
sion cannot order phone placed, case is dismissed. 

J. W. Rutherford v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Wilkes Veneer Company v. Williamston Telephone Company. Complaint 
of toll line service. After investigation it is found that the defendant, Wil- 
liamston Telephone Company, is not a party in the case and that the Caro- 
lina Telephone and Telegraph Company has suspended service on account of 
failure to collect for service. No further complaint being received, case is 
dismissed. 



112 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

North State Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for in- 
creased rates in High Point. The following rates approved : 

Business private line $4.50 per month 

Residence private line 2.50 per month 

Rates for other classes of monthly rental phone service shall remain as 
at present with the exception that, heyond the base zone rate area, the peti- 
tioner is hereby authorized to charge a line rate of 45 cents per month for 
special lines for each quarter mile or fraction thereof and ten cents for each 
quarter mile or fraction thereof on four-party lines. Effective December 1, 
1923. 

North Buncombe Supply Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. Application for installation of phone. Defendant company 
advises that the matter will be investigated and, not having further informa- 
tion and understanding that the matter is adjusted, case is closed. 

E. C. Woollett and Sons and Pippen and Picot v. Home Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. Complaint of telephone service in Littleton. Adjusted. 

Mrs. F. Musant v. Black Mountain Telephone Company. Complaint of 
failure to secure installation of telephone. After conference with defendant 
company, Commission is advised that the matter will receive prompt atten- 
tion and phone be installed as early as possible. Not having further complaint 
case is closed. 

W. T. Angline v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of service at Emma. With advice from defendant 
company that the matter would be handled as quickly as possible and having 
no further complaint, case is closed. 

Elmer Ingle v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in removal of telephone. Phone moved. 

P. R. White v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Henry E. Faison v. Newton Telephone Company. Complaint of service. 
Adjusted. 

Mecklenburg Oil Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany. Complaint of delay in installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

A. T. Lawin v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for installation of telephone. With advice that the matter will be 
thoroughly investigated, and having no further complaint, the Commission 
understands telephone has been installed. 

T. C. Anders v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for removal of telephone. Phone moved. 

J. F. Spivey v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for transfer of duplex phone for party line service. It appearing that 
defendant company had no facilities at the time request was made except 
a four-party line which was refused by complainant, request could not be 
granted ; however, defendant company advises that as soon as vacancy occurs 
on existing circuit the matter will be given prompt attention. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 113 

W. S. Coursey v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone and complaint of delay in securing 
same. Telephone installed. 

G. A. Lyerly v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of delay in installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Farmer Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for authority 
to abandon telephone property. Granted temporarily. 

W. Ashel Lyon v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

S. Wade Marr v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Edward Griesman v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

S. T. Warren v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

H. G. Williams v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Smith Jackson Realty Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

W. H. Ragan v. North State Telephone Company and Southern Bell Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company. Complaint of overcharge on long-distance 
calls. Dismissed. 

Asheville Real Estate Board v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

P. R. White v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Town of Roanoke Rapids v. Home Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of increased rates ; also of service. Adjusted. 

Corporation Commission v. Carolina Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of toll facilities. Adjusted. 

Mrs. J. C. Pierce v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

A. E. Brown v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of removal of telephone. Phone removed. 

E. R. Hampton \\ Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Roanoke-Chowan Telephone Company to the Commission. Application for 
approval of rates. The following schedule approved : 

Residence party line $1.25 per month 

Business party line 1.75 per month 

Residence private line 1.50 per month 

Business private line , 2.00 per month 

Part 1—8 



114 N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 

Mrs. N. Z. Beaty v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Bertie Cook v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

E. P. Willard v. Onslow Telephone Company. Complaint of service. Ad- 
justed. 

W. C. Thurston v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of service at Jackson Springs. Adjusted. 

Nettie G. Crook v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. In 
re establishment of telephone exchange at Fletcher. Petitioner is advised 
that this will be a great improvement in the telephone service in that vicinity 
and that same is approved. 

Bob Hutchinson v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Ap- 
plication for installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

W. E. Breese v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Applica- 
tion for long-distance wire straight from Hendersonville to Asheville. 
Adjusted. 

E. R. Hampton v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Change in service from duplex to individual line. Granted. 

Mrs. R. W. Morgan v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Application for installation of telephone. Phone installed and case closed. 

Nu Grape Bottling Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Application for installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 

Mrs. W. E. Lucky v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
Complaint of failure to install telephone. Telephone installed. 

Thorn Brothers Cash Company v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 
Company. Complaint of delay in installation of telephone. Phone installed. 

Hauser Brothers v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure of defendant to repair telephone out of order. Adjusted. 

H. W. Hewlett v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company. Com- 
plaint of failure of defendant company to transfer telephone from one 
residence to another. Transfer made and case closed. 

Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company to the Commission. Ap- 
plication for discontinuance of toll station at Botha. It appearing that the 
company for whom the toll service was established has finished its operations 
at Botha and this service is no longer required, the application is granted. 

Mitchell-Bissell Company v. Denton Telephone Company and Lexington 
Telephone Company. Complaint of service. Adjusted. 

Spring Garden Cash Store v. Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Com 
pany. Complaint of delay in installation of telephone. Telephone installed. 






CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 115 

WATER COMPANIES 

Elizabeth City Sewerage Company to the Commission. Application for 
increase in rates. This matter is set for hearing and order made allowing 
increase. Exceptions are filed to this order by this city overruling such 
exceptions. Notice of appeal is filed and case is certified to Pasquotank 
County. 

Graham Water Company to the Commission. Application for increase in 
rates for Graham. The matter is set for hearing and after conference 
between the plaintiff and representatives of the city of Graham, matter is 
adjusted. It appearing that the Water Company is purchased by the town 
of Graham. This takes it from under the jurisdiction of the Commission. 
Case is dismissed. 

Elizabeth City Sewerage Company to the Commission. This is a matter of 
discontinuance of service in Elizabeth City on the grounds that the company 
had been and is operating at a loss with no prospect that same can ever 
be operated so as to yield fair return. This case is brought to the Commission 
after an application for increase in rates, which matter has been certified on 
notice of appeal to Clerk of the Superior Court of Pasquotank County. This 
case is now left pending until decision of the Superior Court. 



CLAIMS HANDLED AND DISPOSED OF BY THE RATE DEPARTMENT 
FOR THE YEARS 1923 AND 1924 

B. F. D. Albritton & Company, Hookerton, N. C, roofing shipped from 
Moundsville, W. Va., to Hookerton, N. C. Amount, $4.13. Paid. 

B. F. D. Albritton & Company, Hookerton, N. C, sewer pipe from Greens- 
boro, N. C, to Hookerton, N. C, overcharge 63 cents. Paid. 

Allen's Market, Raleigh, N. C, complaint: delay to trucks when calling 
for less carload freight at Southern Railway station. Adjusted. 

American Agricultural Chemical Company, Henderson, N. C, sulphuric 
acid from Wilmington to Henderson, N. C, petition of Seaboard Air Line 
Railway to make refund of $2.88 per ton. Petition granted. 

W. C. Arvey, Etna, N. C, overcharge on chairs from Williamsburg, O. 
Paid. 

Atlantic Bitulithic Company, Richmond, Va., payment of overcharge on 
shipments of crushed stone from Linville Falls, N. C, to Hickory, N. C, 
amount $891.67. Paid. 

Atlantic Distributing Company, Oriental, N. C, undercharge on car of 
pea baskets from Mount Olive, amount $2.65. Paid. 

Baldwin Brothers, Sanford, N. C, loss of suitcases shipped from Peters- 
burg, Va., to Sanford, N. C, amount $8.35. Paid. 

Max Bane, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on scrap lead from Raleigh, N. 0., to 
Long Island City, N. Y., amount $31.41. Paid. 

O. Z. Barber, Goldston, N. C, brick from Jordan Siding, N. C, amount 
$14.62. Paid. 



116 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

W. B. Barrow, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on washed gravel from Lillington 
to Raleigh, N. C, amount $6.99. Paid. 

R. B. Beckwith, Asheville, N. C, coal shipped from Merna, Ky., and re- 
shipped to Waynesville, N. C. Adjusted. 

L. W. Belch, Tyner, N. C, loss of two bags of flour, amount $15.28. Paid. 

D. D. Bonner, Blounts Creek, N. C, alleged overcharge on auto bodies 
from Aurora 111., destined Washington, N. C. No overcharge existed. 

Blue Fertilizer Company, overcharge on shipment of sand from Endon 
Junction to Aberdeen, N. C, amount $76.80. Paid. 

Borden Brick and Tile Company, Goldsboro, N. C, overcharge on brick 
from Goldsboro to Zebulon, N. C, overcharges of $1.27 and $13.25. Paid. 

Buquo Lime Sales Company, Columbia, S. C, overcharge on ground lime- 
stone from Hot Springs, N. C, to Wagram, N. C, amount $25.76. Paid. 

Earnhardt Manufacturing Company, Charlotte, N. C, switching charge, 
amount $10.50. Paid. 

Barnhardt Manufacturing Company, Charlotte, N. C, overcharge on car of 
bagging switched in Charlotte, N. C, amount $9.09. Paid. 

Barnhardt Manufacturing Company, Charlotte, N. C, overcharge on ship- 
ment of mill run bagging, amount $15.68. Paid. 

Brooks Brothers, New Bern, N. C, amount $71.55. Paid. 

W. J. Burden, Askewville, N. C, overcharge on lumber from Askewville to 
Norfolk, Va., amount $2.08. Paid. 

Carolina Builders Corporation, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on car of laths 
from Fayetteville, N. C, amount $15.56. Paid. 

Caveness Produce Company, Raleigh, N. C, shipment of apples from Hender- 
son, N. C. Adjusted. 

Caveness Produce Company, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on apples from 
Goldsboro to Zebulon, N. C, amount $2.95. Paid. 

Caveness Produce Company, Raleigh, N. C, dewberries from Aberdeen, 
N. C. Refund made. 

Caveness Produce Company, Raleigh, N. C, basket beans lost in transit 
to Pittsboro, N. C. Claim withdrawn. 

Caveness Produce Company,* Raleigh N. C, bananas damaged in transit to 
Louisburg, N. C. Claim withdrawn. 

Cherokee Brick Company, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on brick from Brick- 
haven, N. C, to Chapel Hill, N. C, amount $30.89. Paid. 

Cherokee Brick Company, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on brick from Brick- 
haven, N. C, to High Point, N. C, amount $4.12. Paid. 

Cherokee Brick Company, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on brick from Brick- 
haven, N. C. to Cary, N. C, amount $3.50. Paid. 

Cherokee Brick Company, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on brick from Brick- 
haven, N. C, to High Point, N. C, amount $15.12. Paid. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 117 

Cherokee Brick Company, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on brick from Brick- 
haven, N. C, to Bryson, N. C, amount $67.50. Paid. 

Chowan County Chamber of Commerce, Edenton, N. C, complaint of switch- 
ing service by Norfolk Southern at Edenton, N. C. Adjusted. 

Clark Peanut Company, Plymouth, N. C, overcharge on peanuts from land- 
ings on the Cashie River. Adjusted. 

Henry P. Corwith, Saluda, N. C, overcharge on apples to Raleigh, N. C, 
amount $8.67. Paid. 

Community Freight Association. New Bern, N. C, claim of E. K. Bishop 
Company, overcharge on car of salt from New Bern to Pikeville, N. C, 
amount $10.72. Paid. 

J. E. Davenport, Mackeys, N. C, overcharge on peas from Mackeys, N. C, 
to New York, N. Y., amount $16.24. Paid. 

Denny Veneer Company, High Point, N. C, overchange on care of core stock 
from Woodfin, N. C, to High Point, N. C, amount $5.76. Paid. 

Edenton Peanut Company, Edenton, N. C, overcharge on peanuts from 
Edenton to Manteo, N. C, amount 46 cents. Paid. 

Empire Manufacturing Company, Goldsboro, N. C, overcharge on machinery 
from Virginia, Minn., to Goldsboro, N. C, amount $263.92. Paid. 

J. Exum & Company, Snow Hill, N. C, overcharge on cottonseed hulls and 
meal from Kinston, N. C, to Snow Hill, N. C, amount $11.88. Paid. 

Farmers Hardware Company, Forest City, N. C, complaint in regard to 
assistance in loading and unloading less carload freight. Adjusted. 

Farmville Oil and Fertilizer Company, Farmville, N. C, request for help 
in upkeep of track scales at Farmville used by Norfolk Southern and East 
Carolina Railways. Each agreed to one-third of upkeep. 

J. H. Greenlee, Sevier, N. C, damage to household effects. Adjusted. 

Hayes-McCormack Company, Asheville, N. C, complaint in regard to failure 
of Southern Railway to place equipment for fruits and vegetables. Adjusted. 

J. Frank Harper, Farmville, N. C, claims against East Carolina Railway. 
No jurisdiction. 

R. O. Harper, Maury, N. C, overcharge on barrel of molasses from Wil- 
mington to Maury, N. C, amount $6.42. Adjusted. 

Henderson Snyder Company, Monroe, N. C, overcharge on beans from 
Solana, N. M. Claim paid.. 

Interstate Traffic Adjustment Company, Norfolk, Va., overcharges on logs 
from Sevier, N. C, to Marion N. C. Adjusted. 

Ideal Chair Company, Lincolnton, N. C, petition for siding at Lincolnton, 
N. C. Petition withdrawn. 

Ideal Brick Company, Slocumb, N. C, overcharge on brick from Slocumb to 
Broadway, N. C, amount $44.95. Paid. 

Jackson & Davis,' Wilmington, N. C, overcharge on express packages from 
Wilmington to Wrights ville Beach, N. C, amount 80 cents. Paid. 



118 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

J. W. Jackson, Route 1, Sanford, N. C, overcharge on fertilizer from Wil- 
mington, N. C, amount $5.10. Paid. 

Miss Pattie Jordan, Raleigh, N. C, redemption value of ticket from Den- 
niston to Middleton, N. C, amount $1.56. Paid. 

B. W. Kilgore, Jr., Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on one animal from Fredericks- 
burg, Va., to Raleigh, N. C, amount $51.40. Overcharge denied. 

Laurinburg Cotton Oil Company. Laurinburg, N. C, alleged overcharge on 
cottonseed meal from Laurinburg, N. G, to Mount Airy and Madison, N. C, 
amounts $20.90 and $34.50. Ordered paid. 

Luten Bridge Company, New York City, overcharge on sand shipments 
from Logan to Huntdale, N. C, amount $49.51. Paid. 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company, St. Louis, Mo., overcharge on tobacco, 
amount $2.58. Paid. 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company. St. Louis, Mo., overcharge on tobacco, 
amount $6.06. Paid. 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company, St. Louis, Mo., overcharge on tobacco, 
amount $1.05. Paid. 

J. R. McCracken. Waynesville. N. C, overcharge on live stock from points 
in Tennessee to Raleigh, N. C, amount $108.50. Claim paid with interest at 
rate of 6 per cent from January 1. 1920. 

McConnell Brothers. Asheville, N. C, refund of various icing charges assessed 
at Asheville, N. C, amount $13.00. Paid. 

D. C. McCotter, Cash Corner, N. C, overcharge on gum logs from Cash 
Corner to Norfolk, Va., amount $60.31. Paid. 

McRae Grocery Company, Inc., Rockingham, N. C, complaint on account 
of failure of Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad to pay claims. Adjusted. 

W. S. Martin, Canton, N. G. excessive rate charged on brick from Kings- 
port, Tenn., to Canton, N. C. Claim denied. 

A. J. Maxwell. Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on asbestos shingles from Oneida, 
N. Y.. to Raleigh, N. C, amount $4.17. Paid. 

L. R. Midgett Manteo, N. C, loss of one bag wool in transit from Manteo, 
N. C, to Baltimore, N. C, amount $148.00. No jurisdiction. 

N. C. Cotton Growers Cooperative Association, Raleigh, N. C, penalty .for 
failure to surrender bill of lading within 24 hours required by Rule 16, S. A. L. 
Railway I. C. C. No. A-6983, amount $5.85. Refund paid by S. A. L. Railway. 

N. C. Cotton Growers Cooperative Association, Raleigh. N. C. overcharge 
of $1.35 on cotton. Paid. 

N. C. Cotton Growers Cooperative Association, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge 
on cotton from Elizabethtown to Lumberton, N. C. Claim denied. 

N. C. Traffic Association, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on shipment of blind 
doors, amount 75 cents. Paid. 

N. C. Traffic Association, Raleigh, N. C, overcharge on shipment of green 
tomatoes from Fayette ville, N. C, amount 30 cents. Paid. 



CLAIMS AND COMPLAINTS 119 

Nowell Brothers, Raleigh, N. C, complaint on account of failure of the 
Southern Railway to adjust several claims. Adjusted. 

Gilbert Overton, Route 1, Mackeys, N. O., damage to household goods 
en route from Roanoke Junction to Scuppernong, N. C, amount $15.00. Paid. 

J. E. Phelps, Roper, N. C, complaint : refrigerator service on car of peas 
from Mackeys, N. C, to Jersey City, N. C. Adjusted. 

Peele-Parker and Company, Rich Square, N. C, delay to less carload ship- 
ment of nitrate of soda from Wilmington. Adjusted. 

W. T. Phelps. Route 2, Creswell, N. C, loss of three barrels of potatoes 
shipped from Creswell, N. C, to New York City. No jurisdiction. 

W. M. Poole, Rockingham, N. C, damage to shipment of frames, amount 
$7.60. Paid. 

John E. Rand, Richlands, N. C, overcharge on gin machinery from Garner, 
N. C, to Richlands, N. C, amount $1. Paid. 

Z. V. Rawls. Bayboro, N. C, request for ventilated cars for shipping potatoes. 
Adjusted. 

J. J. Rogers, Ivy, N. C, damage to chinaware moving from East Liverpool, 
O., to J. J. Rogers Company, Ivy, N. C. Claim denied. 

O. C. Sparrow, Aurora, N. C, overcharge on potatoes from Aurora, N. C, to 
Washington, D. C, amount $57.63. Paid. 

C. C. Sparrow, Aurora, N. C, overcharge on car of potatoes reconsigned to 
Richmond, Va., amount $8.89. Paid. 

C. C. Sparrow, Aurora, N. C, shipment of potatoes from Cash Corner, N. C, 
to Washington, D. C. Claim denied. 

A. H. Spears, Creswell, N. C, claim for 5 barrels potatoes consigned to 
New York. Claim denied. 

Statesville Flour Mills, Statesville, N. C, complaint because of failure of 
Randolph and Cumberland Railroad Company to return promptly shipments 
declined. Adjusted. 

Stevenson Brick Company, New Bern, N. C, switching charge for switching 
outside of city limits. Claim denied. 

J. E. Stillman, Creswell, N. C, loss of nine bags of peanuts from Creswell, 
N. C, to Edenton, N. C. No jurisdiction. 

J. R. Stillman, Mackeys, N. C, loss of one-half box fish shipped to Booth 
Fish Company, Philadelphia, Pa., amount $14.29. Paid. 

F. J. Strader, Burlington, N. C, cantaloupes from Furman, S. C, to Bur- 
lington, N. C, amount $38.80. Paid. 

J. C. Tarkenton, Mackeys, N. C, loss of cotton seed from Mackeys to Wilson, 
N. C. Claim denied. 

Troy Cross Arm Company, Troy, N. C, switching service of Norfolk Southern 
Railroad. Adjusted. 

John G. Tooly, Belhaven, N. C, logs from Rhem's Siding to Edenton, N. C. 
Adjusted. 



120 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Union Paving Company, Philadelphia, Pa., overcharge on asphalt plant 
from Dudley, N. C, to Bowden, N. C. Paid. 

Union Paving Company, Philadelphia, Pa., loss on shipment of gravel from 
Garysbury, N. C, amount $55.31. Paid. 

Union Provision Company, Raleigh, N. C, delay on account of misrouting of 
shipment from Christiansburg, Va. Adjusted. 

Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company, Richmond, Va., reparation of $1,075.85 
on sulphuric acid from Wilmington to Selma, N. C. Paid. 

W. L. Williams, Raleigh, N. C, loss of beef from Linden to Raleigh, N. O., 
amount $29.40. Paid. 

Wiley Fertilizer Company, Troy, Ala., refund of $52 overcharge on sheep 
from Owensboro, Ky., to Cary, N. C. Paid. 

J. M. Woodley, Mackeys, N. C, loss of flour from Elizabeth City to Mackeys, 
N. C, amount $8.84. Paid. 

J. M. Woodley, Mackeys, N. C, loss of bundle plow castings from Elizabeth 
City to Mackeys, N. C, amount $1.64. Paid. 

J. M. Woodley, Mackeys, N. C, loss of flour from Elizabeth City to Mackeys, 
N. C, amount $8.09. Paid. 

Rev. N. M. Wright, Tyner, N. C, loss of books and bookcase. Articles 
found. 



FREIGHT RATES 



NORTH CAROLINA EXCEPTION SHEET, No. 6 

TO 

SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION 

(As Published in Consolidated Classification, No. 3) 

Supersedes North Carolina Exception Sheet, No. 5. Applies to freight traffic 
between points within the State of North Carolina. Applicable to all trans- 
portation companies. Subject to change on legal notice. Issued May 22, 
1923. Effective June 6, 1923. 

GENERAL RULES 

Minimum Charge. — The minimum charge for small shipments shall be for 
actual weight at the tariff rates, but not less than 50 cents for any single 
shipment. 

When a less than carload shipment moves under a rate made by a combina- 
tion of separately established rates in the absence of a joint through rate, the 
minimum charge of fifty (50) cents will apply to the continuous through move- 
ment and not to each of the separately established factors. 

Rule to Prevent Overloading of Car With Forest Products 

Cars containing lumber and articles taking lumber rates may be loaded in 
excess of the marked capacity to the extent of ten per cent of the said marked 
capacity, provided that said ten per cent does not exceed 4,000 pounds, and 
cars so loaded will be charged for at the regular carload rating, but if the 
weight in excess of marked capacity of car exceeds 4,000 pounds, the trans- 
portation company may decline to accept same for transportation until the 
load has been lightened to conform to the rule as above. 

In order to arrive at weights, it will be the duty of shippers to furnish 
transportation companies information as to the contents of cars, the quantity, 
kind, dimension and condition (whether green or dry), so that an estimate can 
be made of the weight by use of the classification giving estimated weights. 

This rule applies only at points where scale weights are unobtainable. 

Allowance for Weight of Standards, Strips and Supports on Flat Cars 

Loaded With Lumber 

Allowance for weight of standards, strips and supports on flat cars loaded 
with lumber shall be as follows : 

(a) Allowance of 500 lbs. per car will be made for weight of standards, 
strips and supports on carload shipments of lumber loaded on flat or gondola 
car, but in no case must less than the minimum carload weight specified in 
tariffs be charged for on each car. 

(b) In computing freight charges under this rule, agents will deduct 500 
lbs. from the gross weight of each carload; then subtract the tare weight (the 
weight of car), and extend freight charges on basis of remainder, which is the 
net weight, subject to the minimum carload weight specified in tariffs. 

Carload Minimum Weight on Grain and Grain Products 

The carload minimum weight on Grain and Grain Products, except flour, in 
straight or mixed carloads when in packages will be 30,000 pounds. When in 
bulk, minimum weight as shown in Classification and Exceptions governing 
rates will apply. 



122 N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

Estimated Weights When Actual Weights are Not Ascertained 

Except where otherwise shown in individual items, when the actual weight 
of the articles named below is not ascertained at point of shipment, or at 
destination, or in transit, the following estimated weights shall govern : 

Article Weight 

Clay, per cubic yard 3.000 lbs. 

Gravel, viz. : 

Washed, per cubic yard 2,800 lbs. 

Other than washed, per cubic yard 3,200 lbs. 

Green Seasoned 

Laths, Cypress or Yellow Pine, per 1,000 900 lbs. 550 lbs. 

Laths, other than Cypress or Yellow Pine, per 1,000 750 lbs. 500 lbs. 

Lumber, per 1,000 feet, viz. : 

Rough, viz. : 

Ash (black 5.000 lbs. 3.500 lbs. 

Basswood and Butternut 4,000 lbs. 2,750 lbs. 

Chestnut, Cottonwood, and Cypress 5,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Gum (red) 5,000 lbs. 3.750 lbs. 

Elm (soft) 5,000 lbs. 3,500 lbs. 

Gum (sap) 5,000 lbs. 3,250 lbs. 

Hemlock 4,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Hickory 6,000 lbs. 5,000 lbs. 

Oak 6,000 lbs. 4,500 lbs. 

Poplar 4,000 lbs. 3,000 lbs. 

Yellow Pine, under 6 inches in thickness 5,000 lbs. 4,000 lbs. 

Yellow Pine. 6 inches and over in thickness 4,500 lbs. 4,000 lbs. 

White Pine 4,000 lbs. ^2,750 lbs. 

N. O. S 6,000 lbs. 4.000 lbs. 

Note. — Rough lumber less than one inch in thickness to 
be assessed on a proportionate basis of above. 

Dressed, viz. : 

Cypress, Gum, Poplar, and Yellow Pine, viz. : Green Seasoned 

%-in. Ceiling 1,000 lbs. 

y 2 -in. Ceiling 1,300 lbs. 

%-in. Ceiling or Partition 1,600 lbs. 

%-in. Ceiling or Partition 2,000 lbs. 

i% 6 -in. Ceiling, Partition, or Flooring 2,200 lbs. 

Drop Siding 2,200 lbs. 

Shiplap and Tongued and Grooved Boards, % in 2,300 lbs. 

Shiplap and Tongued and Grooved Boards, i% 6 in 2.500 lbs. 

Siding, Bevel, from 1-in. stock 1,100 lbs. 

Siding, Bevel, from 1%-in. stock 1,400 lbs. 

Siding, Square Edge, from 1%-in. stock 1,600 lbs. 

%-in. Boards 2,600 lbs. 

N. O. S 4,000 lbs. 2,750 lbs. 

Sand, per cubic yard 3.000 lbs. 

Shingles, green, per thousand 600 lbs. 

Shingles, seasoned, per thousand 500 lbs. 

Staves, Headings, or Hoop Poles, green, car loaded to depth of 

forty-three inches, per car 30,000 lbs. 

Staves, Headings, or Hoop Poles, seasoned, car loaded to depth of 

fifty inches, per car..... 30,000 lbs. 

Stone, not dressed, per cubic foot 160 lbs. 

Tan Bark, green, per cord 2,600 lbs. 

Tan Bark, seasoned, per cord 2,'0OO lbs. 

Telegraph Poles, Fence Posts or Rails, per cord 3,500 lbs. 



FKEIGHT RATES 123 

Seasoned 
Turpentine, in barrels, per barrel containing not over 52 gallons 
(the weight of each gallon in excess of 52 gallons to be computed 

on basis of 7.2 lbs. per gallon) 432 lbs. 

Wood, green, per cord 3,500 lbs. 

Wood, seasoned, per cord 3,000 lbs. 



Rates named in tariffs applying between points in North Carolina are gov- 
erned by the Southern Classification with the exceptions contained herein. 

Explanation of Characters 

1 Stands for First Class. S Stands for Special. 

2 Stands for Second Class. S. U Stands for Set Up. 

3 Stands for Third Class. L. C. L Stands for Less Than Carload. 

4 Stands for Fourth Class. C. L Stands for Carload. 

5 ......Stands for Fifth Class. N. O. S Stands for Not Otherwise Specified. 

6 Stands for Sixth Class. K. D Stands for Knocked Down. 

iy 2 Stands for 1% Times First Class. O. R. B Stands for Owner's Risk of Breakage. 

D 1 Stands for Double First Class. O. R. L ..Stands for Owner's Risk of Leakage. 

3 T 1 Stands for Three Times First Class. O. R. C Stands for Owner's Risk of Chafing. 

4 T 1 .Stands for Four Times First Class. 

A, B, C, D, E, F, H, K, L, M, N, O, and P stand for Classes A, B, C, D, E, F, H, 
K, L, M, N, O, and P, respectively. 

Ratings 
Acid Phosphate and Dissolved Bone. See Fertilizer and Fertilizer 

Material. 
Agricultural Implements. C. L., viz. : 

Beams, Plow, loose or in pkgs., 24,000 lbs. min A 

Handles, Plow, loose or in pkgs., C. L. 24,000 min P 

Agricultural Implements, L. C. L. : 

Cotton Choppers ; same as Cultivators. 

Cotton Planters, K. D., packed 4 

Cultivators, K. D., packed 4 

Diggers, Potato ; same as Plows, N. O. S. 

Drills (two-horse), Grain. S. U 1 

Fertilizer Distributors, K. D., packed 4 

Harrows of all kinds and Harrow Frames 4 

Harvesters and Pickers, Cotton '. 1 

Manure Spreaders, S. TJ 1 

Mills, Sorghum 4 

Mowing and Reaping Machines, Binders and Harvesters, whether 

combined or separated, S. U 1 

Planters, Potato ; same as Plows. 

Plow Handles, boxed, crated or in bundles A 

Plow Beams, in bundles A 

Plow Singletrees 5 

Plows, Gang and Sulky, K. D 4 

Plows, N. O. S.. set up 2 

Same, K. D , 4 

Presses, Cider, Hay, and Cotton, K. D 4 

Rakes, Wheeled, other than Hand, S. U 1 

Tedders, Hay, set up, L. C. L 1 

Asbestos Products, viz. : 
Millboard : 

In boxes or crates or in burlapped rolls, L. C. L 4 

In packages named, carload min. wt. 30,000 lbs 5 

Packing : 

Compounded or reinforced, braid or wick not compounded nor rein- 
forced, in bales or burlap rolls or in barrels or boxes, L. C. L 4 

Same, carload, in packages named, min. wt. 30,000 lbs 5 

Roofing, in rolls, crated, or in cases, any quantity 6 



124 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Ratings 
Ashes, Cotton-seed ; same as Fertilizer. 
Ashes, Tan-bark; same as Fertilizer. 
Backhands, made of cotton webbing ; see Dry Goods. 
Bags: 

Burlap or Gunny, new or old, in bags or bundles, bales, boxes, or 

rolls, L. C. L : 6 

Cotton, new or old, clayed or other than clayed, in bales, boxes, bar- 
rels, or bundles, L. C. L 5 

Paper, in bales, boxes, bundles, or crates, L. C. L 6 

Bark, viz. : 

Ground in bags A 

Tan, packed, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 
Tan, C. L., minimum when cars of 36 feet in length or over are used, 
24,000 lbs. ; cars under 36 feet in length, 20,000 lbs. Lumber rates. 

Bark Extract, for tanning only, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min 6 

Barrel Material (cooperage stock). Lumber rates. 
Barrels, half-barrels, and kegs, empty, wooden, tight-cooperage, esti- 
mated wt. 75 lbs. each, L. C. L 5 

Barrels, empty, wooden, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 6 

Barrels, empty, iron or steel, estimated wt. 100 lbs. each, L. C. L 5 

Baskets, Tobacco, wood splint, without tops or handles, nested, in bun- 
dles of not less than three baskets, L. C. L , 2 

Blinds, Doors, and Frames, L. C. L. 4 

Same, C. L, min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Blocks, Concrete Building, L. C. L K 

Same, C. L, per car 25,000 lbs P 

Boiler or Pipe Covering, asbestos, felt, or magnesia, separate or com- 
bined, in blocks, forms, or sheets : 

In barrels, boxes or crates, L. C. L 5 

Loose or in packages, C. L., 24,000 lbs. min 6 

Box Material or Shooks, wooden, for the manufacture of packing cases 
or crates (not including cigar-box material) ; same as Common 
Lumber. 
Boxes, empty, viz. : 

Packing cases or crates, old, which were originally filled with paper 

boxes for knitting factory products, L. C. L 4 

Paper, nested (two or more), packed in wooden boxes or crates, 

L. C. L 1 2 

Paper, not nested, packed, L. C. L iy 2 

Paper, folding, K. D., packed. L. C. L 3 

Paper, packed, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Brick : 

Common, in barrels, boxes or crates, with or without tops, less car- 
load (see Note), 20 per cent higher than carload. 

Note. — Shipments of common brick will be accepted loose, owners to load and 
unload, only when in quantities of 20,000 pounds or over: Provided, that ship- 
ments may be accepted in quantities of less than 20,000 pounds and charged for 
at weight of 20,000 pounds. 

Brick, Hollow and Tile, Building and Roofing, in straight or mixed 
C. L, min. wt. 30,000 lbs '. K 

Brimstone (sulphur) ; same as Fertilizer when for use as Fertilizer. 

Building Material, wooden, consisting of Lumber, rough or dressed, 
Laths, Shingles, Window and Door Frames, Sash (glazed or not 
glazed), Doors (glazed or not glazed), Blinds (glazed or not 
glazed), Carpenter's Mouldings, Balusters, Baseboards, Casings, 
Porch Columns, Newels, Stairwork or Wainscoting, mixed C. L., per 
car 20,000 lbs. (see Note) O 

Note. — The above classification will not apply on straight or mixed carloads of 
sash, doors, and blinds only. 

Burlaps ; same as Bags, Burlap. 



FEEIGHT RATES 125 

Canned Goods, viz. : Ratings 
Fish, Oysters, Fruits, Vegetables and Meats, in metal cans, packed in 
boxes, crates, or barrels, L. C. L 4 

Cans, empty, roving, leatberoid, fiber, paper or tin, for cotton or woolen 
mills, in straight C. L., or with mixed C. L. of cotton or woolen 
mill machinery, min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Casings ; Lumber rates. 

Ceiling, wooden ; Lumber rates. 

Cement, viz. : 

Cement, in bags, actual weight; in barrels, estimated weight: Port- 
land, 400 lbs. ; N. O. S., 300 lbs. per barrel, carloads, 40,000 lbs. min. K 

Natural or Portland (Building Cement), in cloth bags or in barrels, 
L. C. L. 20 per cent higher than C. L. rates. 

Natural or Portland (Building Cement), in cloth bags or in barrels, 
and Lime in barrels, mixed carloads, min. wt. 40,000 lbs. ; same as 
Cement. 

Plaster; same as Cement. 

Roofing; see Roofing. 

Charcoal, Wood, viz. : 

Charcoal, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs L 

In cloth sacks, barrels or casks, L. C. L A 

Cheese, packed in wood 4 

Cigarettes, viz. : 

In wooden boxes, strapped or with ends rabbeted 2 

In fibreboard or strawboard packages (as described in Rule 41, Con- 
solidated Classification, No. 3), with all flaps firmly glued and fur- 
ther sealed with paper sealing strip covering the box where the 
outer flaps meet, or when secured as provided for in Item 1, Note 2, 
Paragraphs C and D, page 125, Consolidated Classification, No. 2, 

or reissues 2 

In boxes, N. O. S 1% 

Cigars, boxed and strapped, corded and sealed, with cording passing 
through each and every board and over each and every seam, in 

boxes 1 

Cinders, coal, per car 25,000 lbs P 

Clay, viz. : 

Fire, L. C. L., packed K 

Same, per car 25,000 lbs , P 

N. O. S., in boxes, barrels, casks or sacks, L. C. L 6 

N. O. S., C. L., per car 20,000 lbs O 

Coffin Stock, wooden, K. D., manufactured of pine, poplar or other com- 
mon woods, dressed, but not further finished, in crates or bundles, 

L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L., 24,000 lbs. min A 

Cooperage Stock; Lumber rates. 

Cornices and Ornamental Work for Buildings, made of sheet or stamped 

metal, plain, galvanized or painted, boxed or crated, L. C. L 1 

Cotton, viz. : 

Cotton, in the boll, in bags or in bulk. C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs 6 

Same, in bags, L. C. L 3 

Unginned, packed in bags, 2,000 lbs. and over, L. C. L 5 

Cotton Goods. See Dry Goods. 

Cotton-seed Hulls and Meal, mixed or in mixed carloads, or in less than 

carloads ; same as Fertilizer. 
Cotton-seed Hulls, Meal, Ashes and Oil Cake. See Fertilizers. 
Cotton Sweepings, Clippings, Motes or Card Strippings in bales (refuse 
of cotton spinning factories, knitting mills or cotton-seed oil mills, 

cotton-gin flues), except in bags A 

Cross-arms, wooden ; same as Lumber. 
Cross-ties ; Lumber rates. 



126 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Dry Goods, viz. : Ratings 

Cotton Factory Products, in the original piece, made wholly of cotton, 
in bales, O. R. of chafing, or packed in rolls covered with burlap, or 
in boxes, viz. : Backbands made of cotton webbing, Calicoes, Cam- 
brics, glazed ; Canton Flannels, plain or dyed ; Canvas, Cottonades, 
Checks, domestic ; Cheviots, domestic ; Cotton Bags, Cotton Bagging 
(including brown cotton bagging), Cotton Towels, Cotton Waste, 
Crash, linen or cotton ; Denims, Drills, Duck, Ginghams, domestic ; 
Jeans ; Jeans, corset ; Kerseys, Osnaburgs, Plaids. Rope, Sack Mate- 
rial, Sheetings, bleached or brown ; Shirting, Silesia, Stripes, do- 
mestic ; Teazle Cloth, Tickings, Twine, Warp, Webbing, backhand ; 

Wicking 5 

Same, unless conditions as above named are' complied with ; same as 

Dry Goods. N. O. S. 
Yarn, cotton, on beams, wrapped, owner's risk of damage to beam 

heads, and so stated in bill of lading 5 

Yarn, cotton, in bales or boxes or on beams wrapped and in boxes or 

crates 5 

Felts, cotton (not batting), in bales 5 

Hosiery, cotton 5 

Excelsior, wood, pressed in bales, C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs. ; Class O 
plus 10 per cent. 

Fertilizer Material, viz. : 
Ammonia, sulphate of ; Blood, dried ; Bones ; Castor Pomace, in bags r 
Potash, muriate of : Potash, sulphate of ; Fish Scrap ; Slate, rotten ; 
Soda, nitrate of ; Sylvinit ; Hoof Meal, in bags or bulk ; Manure, 
bat, bird, or sheep; Manure Salts, in bags or in bulk; Tankage; 
Acid Phosphate, in bulk ; Kainit, in bulk ; Hardsaltz, in bulk ; min. 
C. L. 25 tons or 50,000 lbs. ; 10 per cent less per ton than the rate 
on Fertilizer. 
Same, L. C. L. ; Fertilizer rates. 

Fertilizer, C. L., min. wt. 30,000 lbs. : 

Fertilizers. — This term embraces the following and like articles : 
Ammonia sulphate, bone black, bones, ground or dissolved ; castor 
pomace, or fish scrap, guanos, altovella, fish, Navassa, Navassa 
lump, Peruvian soluble Pacific, nitrate cake, plaster of Paris ; 
potash, German salts of, muriate of, sulphate of ; salt, cake, lump, 
and ground phosphate ; soda, nitrate of and sulphate of ; tank stuff. 
For additional articles taking Fertilizer rates, see Southern Classi- 
fication. 

Fertilizers, L. C. L., packed, 20 per cent higher than carload. 

Fish, viz. : 

Dry, dried, salted or smoked, in bulk, in barrels, boxes or crates 5 

Fresh, packed, collect, freight guaranteed by shipper, L. C. L 2 

Fresh, in refrigerator cars, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs. ; 6 cents per 

100 lbs. higher than Class B. 
Pickled or salted, in barrels, half-barrels, kegs or kits 6 

Flooring ; Lumber rates. 

Flour, viz. : 

N. O. S., in sacks, estimated weight in one-half barrel sacks, 98 lbs. ; 
in one-fourth barrel sacks, 49 lbs. ; in one-eighth barrel sacks, 24% 
lbs. ; except that when actual weight is clearly shown to be less, 
only actual weight is to be charged for. Shipments of flour in any 
except usual size sacks as named above, in all cases to be charged 
for at actual weight. Bills of lading and way-bills must show 
number of sacks of each weight contained in shipment C 

Fruit, dried, L. C. L., viz. : 

Apples, Pears and Peaches, packed 4 

Berries, N. O. S 4 



FREIGHT RATES 127 

Fruit, green, viz. : Ratings 

Apples, in bags, barrels, boxes or crates, L. C. L 5 

Blackberries and Dewberries, packed, for wine purposes, C. L., mini- 
mum 24,000 lbs 6 

Same, L. C. L 5 

Berries, other than Cranberries, packed, prepaid 1 

Grapes, in casks or barrels, for wine purposes, L. C. L 5 

Grapes, in casks or barrels, for wine purposes, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 

lbs 6 

Furniture, C. L., viz. : 

Chairs, finished, K. D., C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 5 

Chairs, in the white, K. D., C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs 6 

Chairs, Settees and Stools, N. O. S., C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Chair Stuff or Stock, N. O. S., parts not joined together, in the rough 

or in the white, min. wt. 30,000 lbs 6 

Chair Stock, wood, viz. : Bent arms, in crates or bundles, brace, 

arms, in sacks, in the rough, any quantity - A 

Safes or Cupboards, kitchen, K. D. or S. U., C. L., 16,000 lbs. min 4 

N. O. S., min. wt. 12,000 lbs 4 

Furniture, all kinds, finished or in the white, taking Fourth Class or 

lower when in straight carloads ; in mixed carload, 12,000 lbs. min. 4 
Furniture, L. C. L., viz. : 

Bedsteads, N. O. S., wrapped or crated 3 

Bureaus and Chiffoniers, wrapped or crated 3 

Chairs, N. O. S., S. U 1 

Chair Stock, wood, viz. : Bent arms in crates or bundles, brace arms 

in sacks, in the rough, any quantity A 

Cots, K. D. or folded 3 

Cribs, K. D. or folded 3 

Desks and Seats, school, S. U. or folded " 3 

Same, K. D 4 

Desks, N. O. S., wrapped or crated 2 

Racks, Hat, wrapped or crated, S. U 1 

Sofas, N. O. S., and Tete-a-tetes, wrapped or crated 1 

Stands, hall, wrapped or crated 3 

Tables, K. D., flat 3 

Table Legs, Slides, Leaves and Supports 3 

Wardrobes, wrapped or crated, K. D 3 

Washstands, wrapped or crated 3 

Furniture, not included in foregoing lists, viz. : 

Bookcases, S. U., wrapped or crated 1 

Chairs, wood, with case splint, rattan, reed, willow, bamboo or solid 

wooden seats, whether manufactured of common or hardwood, 

S. U 1 

Same, K. D.. boxed, crated or wrapped in bundles 2 

Chairs, barber, dental or surgical, S. U., boxed or crated 1% 

Furniture, Store, C. L., viz.: Counters and Shelving (not glass), 

K. D., C. L. min. 20,000 lbs 4 

Mattresses, cotton, excelsior, fiber, shoddy, shuck or straw 3 

Springs, bed and furniture, compressed and packed in barrels, casks 

or boxes 3 

Springs, bed, spiral or coil, compressed and crated 3 

Stands, revolving, display, wooden: Table Rims (not veneered), 

packed or securely tied together A 

Ginseng, in barrels or boxes 1 

Glass and Glassware, viz. : 
Bottles, Carboys or Demijohns, old ; old bottles, gingerale or other 

nonalcoholic beverages in barrels, bottle carriers or boxes, L. C. L. 6 

Fruit Jars, common, packed, L. C. L 4 

Mirrors, viz. : 

Over 3 feet, not exceeding 7x12 feet, packed 2 

Three feet or under, packed 3 



128 3ST. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Glass and Glassware — Continued. Ratings 

Showcases, boxed or crated iy 2 

Window Glass, viz. : Common, L. C. L 4 

Glucose Refuse or Gluten Meal, when shipped to fertilizer manufactur- 
ers, C. L. ; same as Fertilizer. 

Grain : 

In bulk, C. L.. 40,000 lbs. min D 

Corn on Cob, in shuck, in bulk, C. L. 30,000 lbs. min D 

Graphite, crude, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs P 

Gravel, C. L., min. wt. 40.000 lbs. ; 40 per cent less than Class L. 

Grits, in bags ; same as Cornmeal. 

Hay, Fodder and Straw, pressed in bales, L. C. L 6 

Heading and Heading Bolts ; Lumber rates. 

Hominy, in bags; same as Meal, corn. 

Hoop Poles ; Lumber rates. 

Hoop Splits ; Lumber rates. 

Hoops, N. O. S. ; Lumber rates. 

Husks or Shucks, compressed in bales, L. C. L 6 

Ice, prepaid or guaranteed, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs. (see Note) L 

Note. — With shipments of ice in C. L. lots, 1,000 lbs. of sawdust, chaff, or other 
packing will be allowed free. 

Ice, L. C. L., packed, prepaid or guaranteed ; 100 per cent per 100 lbs. 

higher than C. L. (Not subject to minimum class rate.) 
Iron and Steel Articles (not boxed or crated unless so specified), viz.: 
Bars, grate (each shipment weighing 200 lbs. or over in one or more 

pieces), L. C. L A 

Castings, viz. : 

In boxes, kegs, barrels, casks or crates (not machinery or sewing 
machines) 5 

Unpacked (not machinery, parts thereof), each piece weighing 

under 200 lbs 5 

Castings, weighing over 200 lbs. ; see Special Iron. 

Covers, manhole, packed and contents described or in bundles, wired.. 5 

Dog Irons, cast ; same as Castings. 

Flue, iron ; same as Sheet Iron. 

Forgings ; same as Castings. 

Iron, sulphate of, shipped to fertilizer factories ; see Fertilizers. 

Lathing, expanded iron 5 

Nails, in boxes (horse and mule shoes) 5 

Picks, in bundles, barrels or kegs ; see Special Iron. 

Pipe Joints or Fittings, consisting of Elbows, Traps, Tees, Crosses, 

Bushings, Plugs, Couplings and Caps (made entirely of iron, and 

without brass or other trimmings or fixtures) (see Note), packed 

or not packed, L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L. ; see Special Iron. 

Note. — The above ratings will apply on Elbows, Traps, Tees, and Crosses, with 
brass screw clean-out plugs or brass or bronze stay-rods. 

Rails, iron or steel, any quantity A 

Safes, viz. : 

Each weighing over 3,000 lbs. and not over 6,000 lbs 3 

Each weighing 3,000 lbs. or less 4 

Scrap Iron, packed or loose, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs K 

Same, packed, L. C. L A 

Sheet Iron, viz. : 

Cut in strips for stove pipe, nested flat and crated 6 

Plain, Galvanized or Corrugated 6 

Iron and Steel, special, consisting of the following articles: 

Note. — Commodity rates on "Special Iron" will apply on all articles enumerated 
in the following list. In the absence of commodity rates, Class A rates will 
apply. 



FBEIGHT RATES - 129 

Iron and Steel — Special — Gontwmed. Ratings 

Architectural and Structural, consisting of Columns, Pedestals, Capi- 
tals, Saddles, Door and Window Jambs, Plates, Sills, Studding, 
Lintels, Rolled Beams, Angles, Channel Bars, Girders and Tees 

or Zees A 

Axles, car A 

Axles, carriage or wagon, loose or wired together A 

Bar, Band, Hoop, Rod, Plate (not planished or polished), Boiler, all 

unpacked A 

Bar. steel, or steel bars, polished or not polished, packed or unpacked A 

Bolts, Nuts, Rivets and Washers, packed or in bags or bundles A 

Boxes and Skeins, vehicle, in kegs, barrels or casks A 

Boxes and Skeins, wagon, axle, loose, owners to load and unload, C. L. A 

Bridge Material A 

Castings (not machinery or parts thereof), each piece weighing 200 

lbs. or over, unpacked, O. R. B A 

Castings or Forgings, parts of compresses, each piece weighing 2,000 

lbs. or over, owners to load and unload A 

Castings, C. L., viz.: Castings, rough, N. O. S. (not machinery nor 
parts thereof, nor sewing machines nor parts thereof, nor stove 

castings), packed in kegs, barrels, or loose A 

Chains, in barrels or casks A 

Chains, loose or in coils A 

Crowbars A 

Draft Iron A 

Elevator Weights - A 

Filings, Iron A 

Fishbars, Fastenings, and Rail Braces A 

Frogs, Railroad A 

Harrow Teeth, in kegs or barrels A 

Jail Plate A 

Lap Rings A 

Mattocks, in bundles, barrels or kegs A 

Nails and Spikes, in kegs, estimated weight 106 lbs. per keg A 

Nails and Spikes, in double kegs, estimated wt. 208 lbs. per keg A 

Nails, cement coated, in kegs A 

Nails, wire, in kegs, estimated wt. 106 lbs. per keg A 

Nails, wire, in double kegs, estimated wt. 208 lbs A 

Picks, in bundles, barrels or kegs A 

Pipe, cast, released. A 

Pipe, lined with cement, released A 

Pipe Joints or Fittings, consisting of Elbows, Traps, Tees, Crosses, 
Bushings, Plugs, Couplings and Caps (made entirely of iron, and 
without brass or other trimmings or fixtures) (see Note under 

Pipe Fittings, L. C. L.), packed or not packed, C. L A 

Pipe Fittings, wired in bundles, C. L A 

Pipe, wrought, released A 

Plow Clevises, Couplers, Frogs, Heel Bolts, Moulds, or Plant Fenders 
(in bundles, or in kegs, barrels or casks), Plates, Points and 

Wings A 

Plow Steel A 

Poles, electric light or railway A 

Posts, fence, railroad A 

Rust, iron A 

Sadirons, in barrels or casks, released A 

Sadirons, in boxes, contents to be plainly marked on boxes, and con- 
tract to be made by shipper that no other articles shall be put in 

the boxes A 

Sash Weights, unpacked A 

Shoes, horse, mule and ox, in kegs (estimated weight 106 lbs. to keg) A 

Stand Pipes, K. D A 

Staples, fence, in barrels or kegs A 

Part 1—9 



130 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Iron and Steel — Special — Continued. Ratings 

Timber Hangers A 

Tires, wagon A 

Trucks, car A 

Wheels, car A 

Wire, fence, iron (not woven), on reels or in coils, loose or packed in 

barrels, O. R. of wet and rust A 

Note. — On mixed carloads of iron fence wire and nails the carload rate on the 
highest classed article may be applied. 

Tubs, viz. : 

Tubs, bath 3 

Tubs, galvanized iron, closely nested 3 

Vises 4 

Kainit, when shipped to fertilizer factories ; see Fertilizer Material ; 
when in less than 25-ton shipments, Fertilizer rates apply. 

Knitting Factory Products, made wholly of cotton, in bales, O. R. C, 
or in boxes when specific name of articles and shippers' name are 
plainly marked on outside of package and stated in receipt or bill 
of lading 5 

Laths ; Lumber rates. ( See Note. ) 

Note. — In the absence of scale weights, the following estimated weights will apply : 

Laths, green, per 1,000 530 lbs. 

Laths, dry, per 1,000 450 lbs. 

Leather, in bales or rolls or boxes, L. C. L 3 

Lime, viz. : 

In casks or barrels. L. C. L. ; 20 per cent higher than C. L. 

Acetate of, L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L. ; same as Fertilizers. 
Carbonate of, in barrels or casks ; same as Lime. 

Chloride of, in barrels or casks 6 

In packages or bulk, C. L., min. wt. 24,000 lbs., actual weight to be 

charged for ; Class K less 10 per cent. 
In barrels, and Cement in bags or barrels, mixed C. L., min. wt. 

40,000 lbs. ; same as Cement, C. L. 
Slaked, for agricultural purposes, in bulk or bags ; 20 per cent less 
than Fertilizers. 
Lime Rock, ground ; 20 per cent less than Fertilizer. 
Livestock, subject to Rules, Estimated Weights and Valuation of 
Southern Classifications. 

Livestock. C. L., per car 20,000 lbs N 

Livestock, L. C. L. 4 

Locks, viz. : Padlocks and Rim-locks 3 

Lumber, native wood, rough or dressed (see Note), C. L. 24,000 lbs. min. P 
Lumber, native wood, rough or dressed (see Note), L. C. L. ; 20 per 

cent higher than Class K. 
Lumber, Laths and Shingles, in mixed C. L., Lumber rates. 

Note.— In the absence of scale weights, the following estimated weights will be 
used: 

Short-leaf rough pine lumber, seasoned, per 1,000 feet 3,300 lbs. 

Rough spruce lumber, seasoned, per 1,000 feet 2,600 lbs. 

Rough spruce lumber, green, per 1,000 feet 3,000 lbs. 

Machinery and Machines, C. L.. viz. : 

N. O. S., all kinds, boilers, engines or parts thereof, minimum weight, 

24,000 lbs 6 

Machinery and Machines, L. C. L.. viz. : 
Cotton and Woolen Mill Machinery, viz. : 

Beams, wooden, warp, cylinders, spools, bobbins, and shuttles, old.— 6 

Bobbins, Shuttles and Spools, wooden, packed 5 

Card Flats, old 6 

Rollers, iron and steel to be repaired or recovered, rating to apply 
to both directions 4 



FREIGHT KATES 131 

Machinery and Machines, L. C. L. — Continued. Ratings 

Engines and Machinery, hoisting 4 

Pulleys 5 

Pulley Wheels and Blocks, manufactured wholly of iron, wired in 

bundles 4 

Marl, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs. ; 10 per cent higher than rate on Sand. 
Marl or Green Sand, L. C. L. (not taken in bulk), 80 per cent of less 

carload Fertilizer rate. 
Meal, viz. : 

Soy or Soja bean ; Fertilizer rates. 

Corn, N. O. S., except when in paper packages (see Note) D 

Note. — L. C. L. shipments of meal, in cloth bags, each package weighing less than 
21 pounds, will not be accepted unless enclosed in burlap, jute, or duck bags. 
Bills of lading and way-bills for shipment of meal in bags must show number of 
bags of each size, weighing 21 pounds or over, and the number of burlap, jute, 
or duck bags containing bags weighing less than 21 pounds contained in the 
shipment. 

Linseed-oil Meal ; same as Meal, Gotton-seed ; see Fertilizers. 
Meats, all shipments to be charged at actual weight, viz. : 

Fresh, packed or wrapped, L. O. L 3 

Sausage, fresh, packed 4 

Sausage, smoked, packed, L. C. L 6 

Sausage Casings, in barrels or kegs 4 

Tongues, pickled, in barrels or kegs B 

Tripe, pickled, in barrels or kegs B 

Melons, prepaid, in barrels with cloth or slatted wooden tops ; in bas- 
kets with solid or slatted wooden tops ; or in barrels, boxes or 

crates, L. C. L 5 

Melons, C. L., per car 20,000 lbs O 

Mica, viz. : Mica, scrap and ground, in bags or barrels, L. C. L 5 

Molasses, viz. : 

Shipments of molasses will be accepted at an estimated weight of 
12% lbs. per gallon, including package, the gallonage to be taken 
from the marks on the barrel as stenciled by authorized gaugers. 

In barrels or hogsheads 6 

In tank cars, C. L., subject to Rule 35, Southern Classification 6 

Marble and Granite (other than Gravestones, Tombstones, Monuments, 
or parts thereof) : 
Blocks or Slabs, marble, slate, granite or stone, polished or carved 

wholly or in part, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 4 

Same, C. L. min. wt. 30,000 lbs 6 

Blocks or Slabs, marble, slate, granite or stone, rough quarried, not 
packed; also sawed, sand-rubbed (or slushed), hammered or 

chiseled, boxed or crated, L. C. L A 

Same, C. L. ; when blocked in or on cars, per car 30,000 lbs P 

Chips or Cubes, rough or dressed for inlaid or mosaic tiling, L. C. L. 6 
Stone, crushed or rubble, in packages or in bulk, C. L., min. wt. 
40,000 lbs. ; 40 per cent less than Class L. 
Monuments, Gravestones and Tombstones, viz. : 

Marble or granite, not boxed Dl 

Marble or granite, all kinds, N. O. S 1 

Marble, granite, cement or concrete, including parts of monuments, 
gravestones (lettered or not lettered, but not sculptured ) z and 

not including statuary, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 4 

Same, C. L., min. wt. 30,000 lbs 6 

Mouldings, carpenter's, without ornamentation ; Lumber rates. 
Nuts, packed in bags, boxes or barrels, viz. : 

Peanuts and Chufas, L. C. L 5 

Nuts, packed in double bags, boxes or barrels, viz. : 

Chestnuts, L. C. L 5 

Walnuts and Hickory Nuts, L. C. L 5 

Oatmeal, Rolled Oats, or Shredded Oats, in boxes, barrels, kegs, or 

drums 6 



132 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Oils, viz. : Ratings 

Cotton-seed, in barrels, crude, L. C. L A 

Cotton-seed, in barrels, C. L., 30,000 lbs. min A 

Cotton-seed, in tanks, governed by the following rules, viz. : 

1. Rates when in tank cars will be assessed on basis of shell capacity in gallons, 

multiplied by 7% lbs. per gallon. 

2. Tank cars must invariably be loaded to their full capacity, subject to a min. wt. 

of 24,000 lbs. 

In tank cars, C. L A 

Creosote or Dead Oil. in barrels or tanks, C. L 6 

Same, in barrels, L. C. L 4 

Oil, Petroleum and Petroleum Products (notes and estimated weights 
as per Consolidated Classification) : 
Crude Oil, Distillates, Fuel Oil, Gas Oil, Grease (not axle). Refined 
(illuminating or burning) Oil, Lubricating Oil (not axle grease), 
Miners' Oil, Paraffin Oil, Paraffin Wax, Road Oil, Soap Oil, 
Transformer Oil and Wool Oil, Benzine, Gasoline and Naphtha, 
viz. : 

In cans, boxed, C. L 4 

In bulk, in wooden, iron or steel barrels, L. C. L *4 

In packages named, C. L., 26,000 min *6 

In tank cars, C. L., min. shell capacity of tank based on 6.6 lbs. per 

gallon 6 

Paper, viz. : 

Glazed, for manufacture of paper boxes or for wrapping purposes, in 

boxes, crates, rolls or bundles 6 

Printing, in boxes, crates, rolls or bundles, L. C. L 6 

Roofing, in rolls, bundles or crates 6 

Strawboard and Pulpboard ; same as Paper, wrapping. 

Wall, in bundles, boxes or crates 3 

Wrapping or Lining, in bundles, rolls or crates, L. C. L 6 

Paving Blocks, wooden ; Lumber rates. 
Peas, viz. : 

Dried or split, in boxes, bags or barrels D 

Same, in packages or bulk, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min D 

Pickets, wooden ; Lumber rates. 
Pickles, viz. : 

In buckets or pails, wooden. L. C. L 4 

In kegs, barrels or casks, L. C. L 5 

Piles ; Lumber rates. 
Pipe, viz. : 

Earthen and concrete, drain or roofing (pipe and tile), L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L., min. wt. 26,000 lbs., subject to packing requirements 
attached to Class A rating Southern Classification (E. H. 
Dulaney's I. C. C. No. 15, supplements thereto or reissues thereof) A 
Earthen or concrete, farm drain or sewer, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs., 
subject to packing requirements attached to Class A rating in 
Southern Classification (E. H. Dulaney's I. C. C. No. 15, supple- 
ments thereto or reissues thereof) P 

Same, L. C. L K 

Pipe, sewer, earthen or concrete, and fixtures ; flues, flue linings, flue 
tops and chimney caps, and drain tile, earthen or concrete ; in 
mixed carloads, per car 25,000 lbs., subject to packing require- 
ments attached to Class A rating in Southern Classification 
(E. H. Dulaney's I. C. C. No. 15, supplements thereto or reissues 
thereof) ; 25 per cent higher than Class P. 

Pitch, in barrels or casks, N. O. S., C. L. 40,000 lbs. min K 

Planks or Boards, edges glued together ; Lumber rates. 

*Will not apply on Benzine, Gasoline, Naphtha or Petroleum Liquefied Gas in 
wooden barrels. 



FREIGHT KATES 133 

Plaster, viz. : Ratings 

Calcined, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min K 

Calcined, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than C. L. rate. 

Cement; same as Cement. 

Land ; same as Agricultural Lime. 

Plaster of Paris, L. C. L 6 

Same, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min - A 

Wall, in bags or barrels, C. L., 36,000 lbs. min.; Class K, less 10 
per cent. 

Wall, in bags, barrels or boxes, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than 
C. L. rate. 
Plates, viz. : 

Wooden, including Wooden Butter Dishes and Plates, C. L., min. wt. 

15,000 lbs 6 

Wooden Plates or Dishes, nested, packed in crates or boxes. L. C. L 5 

Poles, viz. : 

Hoop ; same as Lumber. 

Telegraph and Telephone ; Lumber rates. 
Porch Columns, wooden ; same as Blinds, Doors and Frames. 
Posts, fence ; Lumber rates. 
Potash, muriate and sulphate, when shipped to fertilizer factories ; see 

Fertilizers. 
Preserves, Fruit Butter, and Jellies, viz. : 

In glass, packed, L. C. L 3 

In wood, L. C. L 4 

In cans, boxed, L. C. L 4 

Pumps and Pump Material, viz. : 

Steam Pumps, Pumping Engines and Machinery, L. C. L 4 

Wooden Tubing, loose or in packages, L. C. L 5 

Rags, viz. : 

In bags or bales, not machine pressed, L. C. L 3 

In barrels, crates or hogsheads, L. C. L 4 

Railroad Rolling Stock Equipment: 

Locomotives, standard gauge, on their own wheels, subject to the fol- 
lowing rules: 

Basis for Calculation of Freight. — Mileage rates between points governed by this 
Exception Sheet will be computed upon the basis of the shortest all-rail stand- 
ard-gauge mileage by available routes of transportation, plus actual arbitraries, 
subject to a minimum distance of 75 miles for each line, and governed by the 
mileage shown in individual mileage tariffs of carriers, parties to this Exception 
Sheet, lawfully on file with the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Locomotives and Tenders, moved by their own power, owner to fur- 
nish fuel and crew, carrier to furnish pilot at expense of owner, 
17 cents per mile. 
Locomotives and Tenders, dead or on their own wheels, connecting 
rods and small parts liable to be damaged, at option of carrier, 
to be taken off and boxed, 23 cents per mile. All expenses for 
oil, waste and repairs are in addition to the rates and will be at 
the expense of the owner. 
Locomotives and Tenders, loaded wholly on flat cars, 28 cents per 

mile. 
Locomotives, loaded on flat cars and weighing less than 40,000 lbs., 
same as Machinery, N. O. S. 
Roofing, viz. : 

Cement, in metal cans, in barrels or boxes, or in tubs, kits, pails or 

barrels, L. C. L 5 

Slate, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

Slate, C. L., min. wt. 40,000 lbs K 

Roots and Herbs, all kinds, in bags, boxes or barrels, L. C. L 4 

Roots, ivy, C. L., per car 24,000 lbs p 

Rosin, in barrels, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 



134 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Ratings 

Rosin, in barrels, C. L., 36.000 lbs. inin K 

Rosin Dross ; apply Rosin rates. 
Salt, viz. : 

In bags, boxes or barrels, L. C. L K 

In bulk, in bags, boxes or barrels, C. L.. 40,000 lbs. min. (see Note).... O 

Note. — Where Class O rates are stated in cents per 100 lbs. the minimum carload 
weight on salt will be 40,000 lbs. Where the Class O rates are stated per car 
the rate on salt will be double Class O per car of 40,000 lbs. 

Salt Cake ; see Fertilizers. 

Sand, C. L., per car 25,000 lbs P 

Sash. viz. : 

Glazed, in boxes or crates. L. C. L 4 

Glazed, in packages named. C. L.. min. wt. 24.000 lbs 6 

Unglazed, in boxes or crates. C. L., min. wt. 16.000 lbs 6 

Unglazed. in boxes or crates ; same as Blinds. 

Sawdust, C. L.. per car 24,000 lbs P 

Screens, viz. : 

Door or Window, of wire, in bundles, boxes or crates, L. C. L 4 

Door or Window, of wire. C. L., min. wt. 18,000 lbs 6 

Sea Grass. Sea Weed, or Salt Hay. pressed in bales. C. L., 20,000 lbs. 
min., 20 per cent less than Class D. 

Shingle Bolts ; Lumber rates. 

Shingles, wooden ; Lumber rates. ( See Note. ) 

Note. — In the absence of scale weights, the following estimated weights will apply: 

Shingles, green, per 1,000 350 lbs. 

Shingles, dry, per 1,000 300 lbs. 

Shooks. boxed or crated (not including cigar box material) ; Lumber 

rates. 
Shooks, barrel, cask or hogshead ; Lumber rates. 
Siding ; Lumber rates. 
Showcases ; see Glass and Glassware. 
Slush. Soap, Stock or similar material for manufacturing soap, in 

barrels ; same as Cotton-seed Oil. 
Soap Stock ; same as Cotton-seed Oil. 
Soda, viz. : , 

Nitrate of, L. C. L. ; same as Fertilizers, L. C. L. 
Nitrate of, C. L. ; see Fertilizers and Fertilizer Material, C. L. 
Sulphate of. C. L. ; same as Fertilizers, C. L. 
Spoke Timber, in the rough ; Lumber rates. 
Staves and Stave Bolts ; Lumber rates. 
Stoves and Ranges, cast iron. L. C. L. Box and crate requirements will 

not apply. 
Sugar, in barrels or hogsheads, or in cartons or sacks packed in boxes 

or in single (see Note) or double sacks 6 

Note. — Ratings will apply when the bag is made of cotton cloth weighing not less 
than 5.6 ounces per square yard and having not less than 96 threads to the 
square inch, including warp and filling, and of tensile strength not less than 61 
pounds in the warp and 68 pounds in the filling, or of Osnaburg (Cotton Cloth) 
not less than 7 ounces to the square yard and having not less than 68 threads to 
the square inch, including warp and filling, and of tensile strength not less 
than 61 pounds in the warp and 68 pounds in the filling, or when the bag is 
made of single cropped and mangled or double calendared burlap weighing not 
less than 10% ounces per yard, 40 inches wide, and counting not less than 11 
porter (warp) and 12 shots (filling), tensile strength to be not less than 61 
pounds in the warp and 68 pounds in the filling. Tensile strength to be deter- 
mined by what is commercially known as the strip test. 

Sumac, viz : 

Leaf, C. L., min. wt. 20,000 lbs K 

Same, in bags or bales, L. C. L 5 

Tallow, in barrels or boxes B 

Tankage, for fertilizer purposes, C. L. ; see Fertilizer. 
Tank Material ; same as Box and Barrel Material. 






FREIGHT RATES 135 

Ratings 

Tar, Coal, in barrels, L. C. L A 

Same, C. L., 40,000 lbs. min K 

Tar, in barrels, L. C. L., 20 per cent higher than Class K. 

Tar, in barrels or casks, C. L., 40,000 lbs, min K 

Tar Residuum ; same as Tar. 

Tar, Coal, in tank cars, minimum weight capacity of tank to be charged 

for at estimated weight of 8V 2 pounds per gallon K 

Teeth, Harrow ; Iron and Steel Articles. 

Telegraph Cross-arms, without insulator pins or brackets ; Lumber 

rates. 
Ties, railroad ; Lumber rates. 
Tile, viz. : 

Drain and Roofing ; see Pipe. 

Building and Roofing and Hollow Brick, in straight or mixed C. L., 

min. wt. 30,000 lbs K 

Timber, N. O. S. ; Lumber rates. 
Tin, viz. : 

Tin and Terne Plate, in boxes, charged at actual weight, L. C. L 5 

Tin Roofing, in rolls, crates or boxes, L. C. L 5 

Tobacco, viz. : 

Smoking 2 

Unmanufactured, in boxes, barrels, crates, bales or baskets 4 

Unmanufactured, in hogsheads or tierces 5 

Unmanufactured, loose in car on the stick, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Tobacco Box Material ; see Box Material. 

Tobacco Trash, Sweepings or Stems, ground or unground, packed, 
L. C. L., or in bulk when in carloads ; Fertilizer rates. 

Tongue, deer, in bags, bales or boxes, L. C. L 5 

Twine, viz. : Jute, packed, L. C. L 5 

Vegetables, not canned or desiccated, viz. : 

Beets, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes or crates 6 

Cabbages, in bags, baskets, boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

Cabbages, in packages named or in bulk, C. L., 24,000 min 6 

Carrots, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes or crates 6 

Cucumbers ; same as Beets. 

Onions, in sacks, L. C. L 5 

Onions, in barrels, baskets, boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

Potatoes, in crates or sacks. L. C. L. 6 

Potatoes, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes or crates. L. C. L 6 

Turnips, in barrels, bags, baskets, boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

N. O. S., packed, prepaid or guaranteed 3 

Vehicles, viz. : 

Carriages, Buggies, and Trotting Wagons, viz. : 

K. D., boxed or well crated, box or crate not exceeding ?A inches 

in height, L. C. L _ 2 

Boxed or well crated, C. L., min. wt. 10,000 lbs 4 

Loose, C. L., min. wt. 15.000 lbs _ 3 

Vehicles. Horse-drawn, viz. : 

Trucks or Wagons, Farm, with or without bodies and without springs. 

Bodies K. D. or flat, or without bodies, gears K. D., loose, L. C. L. 4 
Trucks or Wagons, delivery, with springs (see Note). 

Loose, actual weight subject to minimum charge of 1,000 lbs. each, 
at first-class rate, L. C. L Dl 

Note. — Delivery carts and wagons, with springs, cover the type of light vehicles 
commonly used by retail merchants for delivering packages, but will not cover 
heavy teaming vehicles. 

Vehicle Material and Parts of Vehicles, viz. : 

Bodies, finished, carriage, buggy, trotting wagon, and wagon ; same 
as Carriages, Buggies, Trotting Wagons, and Wagons, respec- 
tively. 

Bodies and Seats, unfinished ; see Wheels. 



136 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

Vehicle Material — Continued. Ratings 

Hubs, packed in rolls or securely tied together A 

Rims, packed or securely tied together A 

Shafts, Bows, Felloes, Singletrees, Spokes, Hubs and Rims, wood, 

unfinished, L. C. L 5 

Spokes, in the rough, packed in bundles A 

Same, C. L., loose or in bundles P 

Wheels, unfinished, L. C. L , 4 

Lumber or Veneer, native wood : 

Less than one-eighth inch in thickness, in boxes or crates, L. C. L. 4 
Loose or in packages, C. L. ; Lumber rate plus 20 per cent. 
Wheelbarrows, viz. : Iron or wood, K. D., trays nested and strapped, 

wheels and handles packed separately, L. C. L 4 

Wood: 

Built-up, native wood, in boxes or crates, L. C. L 6 

in bundles, boxes or crates, C. L. ; Lumber rates plus 20 per cent. 
Same, straight or mixed, C. L. ; Lumber rate plus 20 per cent. 
Wool, viz. : 

In bags, two or more securely corded together or pressed in bales 3 

Unwashed, in bags 4 

Circular No. 243 (cancels Circular No. 229). 



LIST OF AND GROUP DESIGNATION OF COMMON CARRIERS IN 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Group Designation of Common Carriers 

For convenience of the Commission in referring to the common carriers of 
the State, they are hereby grouped as follows : 

Group "A" 

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. 

Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Company. 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company. 

Norfolk and Western Railway Company (except Abingdon Branch). 

Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. 

Southern Railway Company. 

Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company. 

Group "B" 

Asheville and Craggy Mountain Railway. 

Asheville Southern Railway Company. 

Atlantic and Yadkin Railway Company. 

Carolina and Tennessee Southern Railway Company. 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railroad Company. 

Yadkin Railroad Company. 

Group "C" 

Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

Group "D" 

Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Company. 
Appalachian Railway Company. 
Atlantic and Carolina Railroad Company. 
Atlantic and Western Railroad Company. 
Black Mountain Railway Company. 
Bonlee and Western Railway Company. 
Carolina Railroad Company. 



FREIGHT RATES 137 

Carolina and Northeastern Railroad Company. 

Cliffside Railroad Company. 

Danville and Western Railway Company. 

Dover and Southbound Railroad Company. 

Durham and Southern Railway Company. 

East Carolina Railway. 

Elkin and Alleghany Railroad Company. 

East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad Company. 

High Point. Thomasville and Denton Railroad Company. 

Kinston-Carolina Railroad Company. 

Laurinburg and Southern Railroad Company. 

Lawndale Railway and Industrial Company. 

Linville River Railroad Company. 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company. 

Maxton, Alma and Southbound Railroad Company. 

New Holland, Higginsport and Mount Vernon Railroad Company. 

Norfolk and Western Railway Company (Abingdon Branch). 

Ocona Lufty Railroad. 

Piedmont and Northern Railway Company. 

Raleigh and Charleston Railroad Company. 

Randolph and Cumberland Railway Company (J. S. Crews, Receiver). 

Roanoke Railway Company. 

Rockingham Railroad Company. 

Smoky Mountain Railway Company. 

Tallulah Falls Railway Company (J. F. Gray, Receiver). 

Tennessee and North Carolina Railway Company. 

The Townsville Railroad Company. 

Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Company. 

Warrenton Railroad Company. 

Washington and Vandemere Railroad Company. 

Wellington and Powellsville Railroad Company (J. A. Pretlow, Receiver). 

Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad Company. 

Effective March 10. 1924. 
Circular No. 252. 



MAXIMUM CLASS RATES, SINGLE LINE, APPLICABLE TO COMMON 
CARRIERS IN GROUPS A AND B (SEE CIRCULARS NOS. 252 AND 253) 
ON INTRASTATE TRAFFIC BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CARO- 
LINA. 

(Governed by Southern Classification, No. 46, in connection with North Caro- 
lina Exception Sheet, No. 6, supplements thereto and reissues thereof.) 
Rates Shown in Cents 



Distance 



Per 100 Pounds 



14 

181 

211 

25 

281 

33 

351 

361 

381 

391 

41 

421 361 



281 211 
351 281 221 



90 
92 
92 
92 
921 
921 
941 
96 
97 
981 
.. 1001 
1011 
103 
104 
106 
107 
1081 



5 miles and under 

10 miles and over 5— . 

15 miles and over 10 . . 

20 miles and over 15.. 

25 miles and over 20 . . 

30 miles and over 25.. 

35 miles and over 30 .. 

40 miles and over 35 . . 

45 miles and over 40 .. 

50 miles and over 45 . . 

55 miles and over 50 . . 

60 miles and over 55 . . 

65 miles and over 60 . . 

70 miles and over 65.. 

75 miles and over 70 . - 

80 miles and over 75 . . 

85 miles and over 80 . . 

90 miles and over 85 .. 

95 miles and over 90 .. 
100 miles and over 95.. 
110 miles and over 100. 
120 miles and over 110. 
130 miles and over 120. 
140 miles and over 130 . 
150 miles and over 140 . 
160 miles and over 150. 
170 miles and over 160. 
180 miles and over 170 . 
190 miles and over 180. 
200 miles and over 190. 
210 miles and over 200. 
220 miles and over 210. 
230 miles and over 220 . 
240 miles and over 230 . 
250 miles and over 240. 
260 miles and over 250. 
270 miles and over 260. 
280 miles and over 270 . 
300 miles and over 280 . 
320 miles and over 300 . 
340 miles and over 320 . 
360 miles and over 340 
380 miles and over 360 . 
400 miles and over 380 . 
420 miles and over 400 . 
440 miles and over 420 
460 miles and over 440. 
480 miles and over 460 
500 miles and over 480 

"Classes C and D, carload shipments, 20 per cent 
or mixed carloads with grain or grain products other 

Effective March 10, 1924. 
Circular No. 254. 



291 24 

31 

31 

31 

31 

33 

34 

351 

351 

361 

361 

381 

41 

421 

44 

45 

47 

471 

491 

491 

491 

51 

51 

51 

51 

52 

531 

551 

551 

561 

561 

58 

58 

58 

59 

59 



A B C* D* K 



Per 
Ton 



68 
90 
101 
101 
113 
124 
124 
135 
146 
146 
146 
146 
158 
158 
158 
158 
169 
169 
180 



191 
191 
203 
203 
214 
214 
214 
214 
225 
225 
236 
236 
236 
236 
248 
248 
259 
270 
293 
304 
315 
326 
349 
360 
371 
383 
383 



Per 

Carload 



1300 
1400 
1600 
1700 
2000 
2250 
2450 
2500 
2700 
2850 
2950 
3100 
3300 
3400 
3550 
3650 
3850 
3950 
4100 
4100 
4250 
4400 
4500 
4700 
4750 
4750 
4950 
4950 
5100 
5200 
5350 
5550 
5650 
5650 
5800 
5800 
5900 
5900 
6100 
6200 
6350 
6500 
6650 
6750 
7000 
7000 
7200 
7350 
7350 



1050 
1150 
1300 
1400 
1600 
1600 
1700 
1700 
1850 
1850 
2000 
2000 
2150 
2150 
2250 
2250 
2450 
2450 
2500 
2500 
2700 
2850 
2850 
2950 
2950 
3100 
3100 
3300 
3300 
3400 
3400 
3550 
3550 
3650 
3650 
3850 
3850 
3950 
4100 
4250 
4400 
4500 
4700 
4750 
4950 
5100 
5200 
5350 
5550 



720 
900 
1100 
1150 
1350 
1500 
1600 
1700 
1700 
1700 
1850 
1850 
1850 
2000 
2000 
2000 
2150 
2150 
2150 
2250 
2250 
2450 
2450 
2500 
2700 
2700 
2850 
2850 
2950 
2950 
3100 
3100 
3300 
3300 
3300 
3400 
3400 
3400 
3550 
3650 
3850 
3950 
4100 
4250 
4400 
4500 
4700 
4750 
4950 



less than rates shown 
than flour. 



including hay in straight 



MAXIMUM CLASS RATES, JOINT LINE, APPLICABLE TO COMMON 
CARRIERS IN GROUPS A AND B (SEE CIRCULARS NOS. 252 AND 
253) ON INTRASTATE TRAFFIC BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CARO- 
LINA. 

(Governed by Southern Classification, No. 46, in connection with North Caro- 
lina Exception Sheet, No. 6, supplements thereto and reissues thereof.) 
Rates Shown in Cents 









Per 100 Pounds 


Per 
Ton 


Per 
Carload 


Distance 


















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


A 


B 


C* 


D* 


K 


L 


N 


O 


P 


5 miles and under 


244 


20 


16 


14 


114 


104 


84 


104 


104 


84 


6 


101 


1600 


1300 


1100 


10 miles and over 5 


28| 


244 


20 


17 


14 


114 


104 


H4 


114 


104 


7 


113 


1700 


1400 


1300 


15 miles and over 10 


33 


27 


224 


20 


16 


13 


114 


13 


13 


114 


8 


124 


2000 


1600 


1400 


20 miles and over 15 


364 


31 


27 


224 


17 


14 


13 


14 


14 


13 


84 


135 


2250 


1700 


1600 


25 miles and over 20 


41 


34 


294 


244 


184 


16 


14 


16 


16 


14 


9 


141 


2500 


1850 


1700 


30 miles and over 25 


45 


384 


33 


27 


20 


17 


14 


17 


17 


14 


104 


146 


2700 


1850 


1850 


35 miles and over 30 


m 


41 


34 


284 


214 


17 


16 


184 


17 


16 


104 


158 


2850 


2000 


2000 


40 miles and over 35 


51 


424 


354 


294 


224 


184 


16 


184 


17 


16 


n 


158 


2950 


2000 


2050 


45 miles' and over 40 


53* 


44 


364 


31 


224 


184 


17 


20 


184 


16 


n 


169 


3100 


2150 


2050 


50 miles and over 45 


56* 


45 


384 


33 


244 


20 


17 


20 


184 


16 


n 


169 


3300 


2150 


2050 


55 miles and over 50 


58 


47 


394 


33 


'25 


20 


184 


214 


184 


17 


114 


180 


3400 


2250 


2200 


60 miles and over 55 


59 


474 


41 


34 


25 


214 


184 


214 


184 


17 


114 


180 


3550 


2250 


2200 


65 miles and over 60 


61 


494 


424 


34 


27 


214 


20 


224 


20 


17 


114 


180 


3650 


2450 


2200 


70 miles and over 65 


62 


51 


44 


34 


27 


224 


20 


224 


20 


17 


114 


180 


3850 


2450 


2300 


75 miles and over 70 


634 


52 


45 


354 


284 


224 


20 


244 


20 


17 


114 


191 


3950 


2500 


2300 


80 miles and over 75 


65 


534 


47 


354 


284 


244 


214 


244 


214 


184 


114 


191 


4100 


2500 


2300 


85 miles and over 80 


66i 


554 


47 


354 


294 


244 


214 


25 


214 


184 


13 


203 


4250 


2700 


2500 


90 miles and over 85 


67| 


564 


474 


354 


294 


244 


214 


25 


214 


184 


13 


203 


4400 


2700 


2500 


95 miles and over 90 


694 


58 


474 


364 


294 


25 


224 


25 


214 


184 


13 


203 


4400 


2850 


2500 


100 miles and over 95 


70 


59 


494 


384 


31 


25 


224 


27 


224 


20 


13 


203 


4500 


2850 


2600 


110 miles and over 100... 


734 


62 


51 


394 


31 


25 


224 


27 


224 


20 


134 


214 


4700 


2950 


2600 


120 miles and over 110... 


76 


65 


52 


394 


33 


27 


244 


284 


244 


214 


134 


214 


4750 


3100 


2750 


130 miles and over 120 


79 


674 


534 


41 


33 


27 


244 


284 


244 


214 


14 


214 


4950 


3100 


2750 


140 miles and over 130 


81* 


694 


554 


41 


34 


284 


25 


294 


25 


224 


14 


214 


5100 


3300 


2900 


150 miles and over 140 


84| 


72 


564 


424 


34 


284 


25 


294 


27 


224 


14 


225 


5100 


3300 


3050 


160 miles and over 150 


87| 


734 


59 


45 


364 


294 


25 


31 


27 


224 


15 


225 


5200 


3400 


3050 


170 miles and over 160 


90 


744 


61 


47 


394 


31 


27 


31 


284 


244 


15 


236 


5200 


3400 


3150 


180 miles and over 170... 


92 


76 


62 


474 


394 


31 


27 


33 


284 


244 


16 


236 


5200 


3550 


3150 


190 miles and over 180 


924 


78 


634 


494 


424 


33 


27 


33 


284 


244 


16 


248 


5350 


3550 


3350 


200 miles and over 190... 


944 


79 


65 


51 


44 


34 


27 


33 


294 


25 


16 


248 


5550 


3650 


3350 


210 miles and over 200... 


96 


804 


664 


52 


44 


34 


27 


34 


294 


25 


16 


259 


5650 


3650 


3400 


220 miles and over 210 ... 


97 


814 


674 


534 


45 


354 


284 


354 


31 


27 


17 


259 


5800 


3850 


3400 


230 miles and over 220 ... 


97 


814 


674 


534 


45 


354 


284 


354 


31 


27 


17 


259 


5900 


3850 


3600 


240 miles and over 230 .. . 


984 


834 


674 


534 


45 


354 


294 


364 


33 


284 


174 


259 


5900 


3950 


3600 


250 miles and over 240... 


984 


834 


674 


554 


45 


354 


294 


364 


33 


284 


174 


270 


6100 


3950 


3600 


260 miles and over 250 


984 


834 


674 


554 


45 


354 


31 


384 


34 


294 


184 


270 


6100 


4100 


3750 


270 miles and over 260... 


1004 


844 


694 


554 


47 


354 


31 


384 


34 


294 


184 


270 


6200 


4100 


3750 


280 miles and over 270... 


1004 


844 


694 


554 


47 


354 


31 


394 


35 


31 


194 


270 


6200 


4250 


3750 


300 miles and over 280.. _ 


1014 


86 


70 


564 


47 


364 


33 


394 


35 


31 


20 


293 


6350 


4400 


3850 


320 miles and over 300... 


103 


874 


72 


58 


47 


364 


33 


394 


36 


33 


214 


304 


6500 


4500 


4000 


340 miles and over 320 


104 


89 


734 


59 


47 


364 


33 


394 


36 


33 


214 


315 


6650 


4700 


4200 


360 miles and over 340 


106 


89 


734 


59 


474 


364 


33 


41 


374 


34 


224 


326 


6750 


4750 


4300 


380 miles and over 360 ... 


107 


90 


744 


61 


494 


384 


34 


41 


374 


34 


224 


349 


6950 


4950 


4450 


400 miles and over 380... 


1084 


92 


744 


61 


494 


384 


34 


41 


374 


34 


244 


360 


7000 


5100 


4550 


420 miles and over 400 


110 


924 


76 


62 


51 


394 


34 


41 


374 


34 


244 


371 


7250 


5200 


4750 


440 miles and over 420 ... 


1114 


924 


76 


62 


51 


394 


34 


41 


384 


35 


25 


383 


7350 


5350 


4850 


460 miles and over 440. __ 


1124 


944 


78 


62 


51 


394 


354 


424 


384 


35 


25 


405 


7350 


5550 


5000 


480 miles and over 460... 


1144 


944 


78 


634 


634 


41 


354 


424 


384 


35 


27 


416 


7600 


5650 


5150 


500 miles and over 480 


115 


96 


79 


. 634 


634 


41 


364 


44 


394 


36 


27 


416 


7600 


5800 


5300 



"Classes C and D, carload shipments, 20 per cent 
or mixed carloads with grain or grain products other 

Effective March 10. 1924. 
Circular No. 255. 



less than rates shown, 
than flour. 



including hay in straight 



140 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



On joint traffic between stations on the Southern Railway and stations on 
the lines in Group B (see Circular No. 252) apply Southern Railway single-line 
rates. 

On joint traffic between stations on the lines of Group B carriers and stations 
on the lines of Groups A, C, and D carriers (see Circular No. 252), when 
Southern Railway is a party to the movement, the mileage of Group B carriers 
must be treated as a part of the Southern Railway mileage. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

March 1, 1924. Clerk. 

Circular No. 253. 



LIVESTOCK RATES APPLICABLE TO COMMON CARRIERS IN GROUPS 
A, B AND C (SEE CIRCULARS NOS. 252 AND 253) ON INTRASTATE 
TRAFFIC BETWEEN POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 



(Governed by Southern 


Classification, No. 46 


in connection with North Caro- 


lina Exception 


Sheet 


, No. 


6, supplements thereto 


and 


reissues thereof.) 




In Cents per 100 Pounds 


Distance 

- • 


Cattle — Beef and Stock, 
Single Deck, C. L. Mini- 
mum 20,000 Lbs. (Double 
Deck Not Accepted) 


CO '8 
Si)." 

ss 

c3 • CO 
co „M 

oe a 


a ,• 
id co 
a -SHi 

■J OJO 

Ct> CC-rH 

£2i 


Calves and Hogs, Double 
Deck, C. L. Minimum 
22,000 Lbs.; Sheep, Goats, 
Lambs, Kids, Double 
Deck, C. L. Minimum 
18,000 Lbs. 


CO 

M 

a 

o 

w 


. o 
hJTS 

o s 

CO O 

a c 
«| 

sa 
8 .a 




Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


■P 10 ■ - 

pi en 

g"o3 a 

u CD 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


5 miles and under... 


7 


11 


8.05 


11.05 


8.75 


11.75 




7 


11 


11 


154 


10 miles and over 5... 


7 


11 


8.05 


11.05 


8.75 


11.75 




7 


11 


** <^ ° 

5> fc -*» ,A 


12| 


154 


15 miles and over 10.. 


8 


11 


9.2 


12.2 


10 


13 




8 


11 


be 25 e 
e Stocki 
., add % 

ker rate: 


14 


17 


20 miles and over 15.. 


9 


12 


10.35 


13.35 


11.25 


14.25 




9 


12 


15 


18 


25 miles and over 20.. 


10 


13 


11.5 


14.5 


12.5 


15.5 




10 


13 


16 


19 


30 miles and over 25.. 


11 


14 


12.65 


15.65 


13.75 


16.75 




11 


14 


= B So 


17 


20 


35 miles and over 30. . 


12 


15 


13.8 


16.8 


15 


18 




12 


15 


18 


21 


40 miles and over 35.. 


13 


16 


14.95 


17.95 


16.25 


19.25 




13 


16 


3, and Kid 
;rein. Joii 
to 200 mile 
single line 


19 


22 


50 miles and over 40.. 


14 


17 


16.1 


19.1 


17.5 


20.5 




14 


17 


204 


234 


60 miles and over 50. . 


15 


18 


17.25 


20.25 


18.75 


21.75 




15 


18 


22 


25 


70 miles and over 60. . 


16 


19 


18.4 


21.4 


20 


23 




16 


19 


234 


264 


80 miles and over 70.. 


17 


20 


19.55 


22.55 


21.25 


24.25 




17 


20 


^S° 


25 


28 


90 miles and over 80.. 


18 


21 


20.7 


23.7 


22.5 


25.5 




18 


21 


s, Go 
umns 
nts; 1 
jent, 


264 


294 


100 miles and over 90. . 


19 


22 


21.85 


24.85 


23.75 


26.75 




19 


22 


28 


31 


110 miles and over 100_ 


20 


23 


23 


26 


25 


28 




20 


23 




29 


32 


120 miles and over 110. 


21 


24 


24.15 


27.15 


26.25 


29.25 




21 


24 


Hogs, Pigs, Sheep, Lai 
tes, as shown in other i 
to 190 miles, inc., add 3 
i to 500 miles, inc., add 


30 


33 


130 miles and over 120. 


22 


25 


25.3 


28.3 


27.5 


30.5 




22 


25 


31 


34 


140 miles and over 130. 


23 


26 


26.45 


29.45 


28.75 


31.75 




23 


26 


32 


35 


150 miles and over 140. 


24 


27 


27.6 


30.6 


30 


33 




24 


27 


33 


36 


160 miles and over 150. 


25 


28 


28.75 


31.75 


31.25 


34.25 




25 


28 


34 


37 


170 miles and over 160. 


25| 


28| 


29.33 


32.33 


31.88 


34.88 




25| 


28| 


35 


38 


180 miles and over 170. 


26 


29 


29.9 


32.9 


32.5 


35.5 




26 


29 


354 


384 


190 miles and over 180. 


27 


30 


31 


34.5 


33.75 


36.75 




27 


30 


364 


394 


200 miles and over 190. 


274 


30 


31.6 


34.5 


34.38 


36.88 




27-| 


30 


37 


40 


210 miles and over 200. 


28 


30 


32.2 


34.2 


35 


37 




28 


30 


« 2 &5 

0) " 3co 


38 


40 


220 miles and over 210. 


29 


31 


33.35 


35.35 


36.25 


38.25 




29 


31 


■Sals 


39 


41 


230 miles and over 220. 


30 


32 


34.5 


36.5 


37.5 


39.5 




30 


32 


-SJ8 

° to 


394 


414 


240 miles and over 230. 


31 


33 


35.65 


37.65 


38.75 


40.75 




31 


33 


404 


424 


250 miles and over 240. 


32 


34 


36.8 


38.8 


40 


42 




32 


34 


Ofl Jo^ 


41 


43 


275 miles and over 250. 


m 


354 


38.5 


40.5 


41.88 


43.88 




334 


354 


424 


444 


290 miles and over 275. 


35 


37 


40.25 


42.25 


43.75 


45.75 




35 


37 


u. ™ tS - 


44 


46 


300 miles and over 290. 


35 


37 


40.25 


42.25 


43.75 


45.75 




35 


37 


Rates on Stock 
for single line 1 
[ be made as foil 
to 350 miles, in 


44 


46 


325 miles and over 300. 


36| 


m 


41.98 


43.98 


45.63 


47.63 




364 


384 


45 


47 


350 miles and over 325. 


38 


40 


43.7 


45.7 


47.5 


49.5 




38 


40 


46 


48 


375 miles and over 350. 


39| 


40| 


45.42 


46.42 


49.38 


50.38 




39| 


m 


47 


48 


400 miles and over 375. 


41 


42 


47.15 


48.12 


51.25 


52.25 




41 


42 


48 


49 


425 miles and over 400. 


424 


43| 


48.88 


49.88 


53.13 


54.13 




424 


43| 


49 


50 


450 miles and over 425. 


44 


45 


50.6 


51.6 


55 


56 




44 


* 45 


111 


50 


51 


480 miles and over 450. 


45 


46 


51.75 


52.75 


56.25 


57.25 




45 


46 


52 


52 


500 miles and over 480- 


46 


47 


52.9 


53.9 


57.5 


58.5 




46 


47 




524 


534 



Note. — Horses and Mules, C. L. minimum weight: 

23,000 lbs. per standard car 36 feet, 7 inches and under in length. 

24,500 lbs. per standard car 36 feet, 7 inches to and including 38 feet, 6 inches in length. 
25,780 lbs. per standard car over 38 feet, 6 inches to and including 40 feet, 6 inches in length. 
26,910 lbs. per standard car over 40 feet, 6 inches in length. 

Effective November 1, 1924. 
Circular No. 264. 



142 N\ C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 

RATES. RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING SWITCHING AT 
POINTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Rule 1. — Carriers must furnish cars for loading, and must also accept from 
each other cars loaded at warehouses or sidetracks of one carrier for delivery 
at sidetracks or warehouses of the other carriers within switching limits. 

Switching Service 

Rule 2. — Switching service, as referred to herein, is defined as a service 
performed to or from private or assigned sidings within switching limits, 
preceding or following a transportation movement. 

Free Switching 

Rule 3. — Cars handled in switching service loaded will be entitled to one 
free switch movement empty, including delivery to any connecting line within 
switching limits, except as otherwise provided herein. 

Minimum Weight for Switching Service 

Rule 4.— (a) Cars will be placed on private or assigned sidings at all 
stations within switching limits of carriers for the receipt or delivery of freight 
when in lots aggregating not less than the following quantities, viz. : 

Articles rated in Southern Classification, No. 46 (Agent E. H. Dulaney's 
No. 17, supplements thereto or reissues thereof) at Fifth Class or higher, and 

Leaf Tobacco 5,000 pounds 

Articles rated in Associated Railways and North Carolina Exception Sheets 
(Notes 4 and 91, I. C. C. No. 4, Exception No. 1 to Southern Classification, 
No. 46) (Agent E. H. Dulaney's No. 17, supplements thereto or reissues 
thereof) in Classes "K" to "P," except brick or ice, L. C. L., carload minimum 
as per classification, 

Brick or Ice, L. C. L 10,000 pounds 

All other freight 10,000 pounds 

Or 

(b) Freight without minimum when consisting of articles requiring facilities 
for loading or unloading, when such facilities are not furnished ; or 

Cotton without minimum when delivered to or received from compresses. 

Excess Over Full Carload 

Rule 5. — When a lot of freight is offered for shipment in one day on which 
carload rates are provided, in quantities exceeding the amount that can be 
loaded in one car, the surplus, loaded in a separate car, will be switched at 
the rates, rules and regulations shown herein. 

Subsequent Switch Movement 

Rule 6. — After delivery of carload freight has been accomplished either by 
placing on private or assigned sidings for delivery to consignee, or by storage, 
any subsequent movement will be subject to charges provided in Rule 9. 

Interchange Switching Rates 

Rule 7. — Carriers will switch carload traffic (as defined in Rule 4) between 
private or assigned sidings and the usual interchange tracks with connecting 
lines at such points, at the maximum rate of $2.25 per car. 

Local Switching Movement 

Rule 8. — A movement which begins and ends within switching limits and 
which is not incident to the forwarding or delivery of a shipment to or from 
a point without said limits and is not covered by these regulations, is a local 
switching movement and will be treated as such. (See Rule 9.) 



FREIGHT RATES 143 

Local Switching Rates 

Rule 9. — That is, switching of traffic which is loaded at one point in a town 
and is discharged at another point in the same town within switching limits, 
when the haul involved does not exceed a distance of three miles, and when 
the service performed applies only on traffic originating and moving wholly 
within the State of North Carolina. (After cars are placed the owner must 
load or unload, as the case may be. within 24 hours, otherwise the usual 
demurrage charges will apply.) 

(a) When such traffic originates at and is discharged at points on the rails 
of one and the same carrier, the switching charges will be as shown in 
Paragraph (e). 

(b) When such traffic originates at a point on the rails of one carrier and 
is discharged at a point on the rails of another carrier the switching* charges 
will be as shown in Paragraph (f). 

(c) When such traffic originates at and is discharged at the same plant or 
industry on the rails of one and the same company, the switching charges 
will be as shown in Paragraph (d). 

Definition of Intra-Plant, Intra-Terminal and Inter-Terminal Switching 

Intra-Plant Switching : A switching movement from one track to another 
within the same plant or industry. 

Intra-Terminal Switching: A switching movement (other than Intra- 
Plant Switching) from one track to another of the same road within the 
switching limits of one station or industrial district. 

Inter-Terminal Switching: A switching movement from a track of one 
road to a track of another road when both tracks are within the switching 
limits of the same station or industrial switching district. 

Switching Charges (Regardless of Weight or Contents) 

(d) Intra-Plant Switching $3.60 per car 

(e) Intra-Terminal Switching $5.85 per car 

(f) Inter-Terminal Switching $5.85 per car 

Effective July 1, 1922. 

Circular No. 261 (cancels Circular No. 225). 



144 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RATES ON FERTILIZER. C. L. 30,000 POUNDS MINIMUM, IN CENTS 
PER TON TWO THOUSAND POUNDS 



Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 


Rate 
Joint 
Haul 


Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 


Rate 
Joint 
Haul 




90 
102 
124 
135 
147 
158 
158 
169 
180 
180 
192 
203 
203 
214 
214 
225 
237 
237 
248 
259 
259 
270 
270 
282 
293 


113 
135 
147 
158 
180 
180 
192 
203 
203 
214 
214 
225 
237 
237 
248 
259 
259 
270 
270 
282 
293 
293 
304 
315 
327 




315 
315 
327 
327 
338 
349 
349 
360 
372 
372 
383 
383 
394 
405 
428 
439 
450 
462 
484 
495 
507 
518 
540 
551 


338 




170 miles and over 160 . 


349 






349 






360 






372 




210 miles and over 200 ._ .. 


372 




220 miles and over 210 


383 




230 miles and over 220 


383 




240 miles and over 230 


394 




250 miles and over 240 

260 miles and over 250 


405 




405 




270 miles and over 260 


417 




280 miles and over 270 


428 




300 miles and over 280 

320 miles and over 300 

340 miles and over 320 

360 miles and over 340 


439 




450 




462 




484 




380 miles and over 360 


495 




400 miles and over 380 

420 miles and over 400 

440 miles and over 420. 

460 miles and over 440 

480 miles and over 460 


507 




518 




540 




552 




563 






574 


150 miles and over 140 . . 











Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five miles 
of rail within the State, except where other specific rates are approved by the 
Commission. 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

May 10, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 244 (cancels Circular No. 238). 






FREIGHT KATES 



145 



RATES ON LUMBER, C. L. MINIMUM WEIGHT 24,000 POUNDS, IN 
CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 



Distance 



Single 


Joint 


Line 


Line 


21 


4| 


3£ 


5 


4§ 


6 


5 


6| 


6 


7 


6§ 


8 


7 


8h 


8 


9 


8* 


10| 


9 


11 


10} 


Hi 


11 


iii 



Distance 



Joint 
Line 



5 miles and under... 

10 miles and over 5.. 

15 miles and over 10. 

25 miles and over 15. 

40 miles and over 25. 

55 miles and over 40. 

70 miles and over 55. 

90 miles and over 70. 
110 miles and over 90. 
140 miles and over 110 
170 miles and over 140 
200 miles and over 170 



240 miles and 
280 miles and 
300 miles and 
320 miles and 
340 miles and 
360 miles and 
380 miles and 
420 miles and 
460 miles and 
480 miles and 
500 miles and 



over 200 
over 240 
over 280 
over 300 
over 320 
over 340 
over 360 
over 380 
over 420 
over 460 
over 480 



13 

13| 

14 

15 

16 

16 

17 

m 

m 

20 
20 



Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five 
miles of rail within the State, except where other specific rates are approved 
by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

May 10, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 245 (cancels Circular No. 239). 



Part I— 10 



146 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



LOGS, ROUGH, C. L. 



PER CAR 40,000 POUNDS, 
IN CENTS 



EXCESS IN PROPORTION 



Distance 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


Distance 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 










2850 
2950 
2950 
3100 
3100 
3300 
3300 
3400 
3400 
3550 
3550 
3650 
3650 
3850 
3850 
3950 
4000 
4100 
4250 
4300 
4400 
4450 
4500 
4550 


3400 


10 miles and over 5.. 


*720 


*1300 


170 miles and over 160 


3550 
3550 




*855 


*1400 




3650 




200 miles and over 190 .. 


3650 




*1050 


*1600 


210 miles and over 200 

220 miles and over 210 

230 miles and over 220 


3850 




3850 




*1150 


*1700 


3950 




240 miles and over 230. 


3950 




*1300 


*1850 




4100 




260 miles and over 250 


4100 




*1400 


*2000 


270 miles and over 260 


4250 




280 miles and over 270 


4250 




*1600 


*2150 


300 miles and over 280 


4400 




320 miles and over 300 


4450 




*1700 


*2250 


340 miles and over 320 

360 miles and over 340 


4500 




4550 




*1850 
*2000 
2151 
2250 
2450 
2500 
2700 


*2450 
*2500 
2700 
5850 
2950 
3100 
3300 


380 miles and over 360 


4700 




400 miles and over 380 


4750 






4850 






4950 






5Q00 






5100 




500 miles and over 480 


5150 









*When rates are not shown for the exact distance, the charge shall not exceed the rate for the 
nearest distance. In case where the haul is equidistant the charge shall be that for the next higher 
distance. 

Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five 
miles of rail within the State, except where other specific rates are approved 
by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

May 10, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 246 (cancels Circular No. 240). 






FKEIGHT RATES 



147 



LOGS, ROUGH, C. L. 



PER CAR 40,000 POUNDS, 
IN CENTS 



EXCESS IN PROPORTION 



Distance 



Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


*720 


*1300 


*855 


*1400 


*1050 


*1600 


*1150 


*1700 


*1300 


*1850 


*1400 


*2000 


*1600 


*2150 


*1700 


*2250 


*1850 


*2450 


♦2000 


*2500 


2150 


2700 


2250 


2850 


2450 


2950 


2500 


3100 


2700 


3300 


2850 


3400 


2950 


3550 


2950 


3550 


3100 


3650 


3100 


3650 



Distance 



Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


3300 


3850 


3300 


3850 


3400 


3950 


3400 


3950 


3550 


4100 


3550 


4100 


3650 


4250 


3650 


4250 


3850 


4400 


3850 


4450 


3950 


4500 


4000 


4550 


4100 


4700 


4250 


4750 


4300 


4850 


4400 


4950 


4450 


5000 


4500 


5100 


4550 


5150 



10 miles 

20 miles 

30 miles 

40 miles.. 

50 miles 

60 miles 

70 miles 

80 miles 

90 miles 

100 miles 

110 miles and over 100. 

120 miles and over 110. 

130 miles and over 120. 

140 miles and over 130. 

150 miles and over 140. 

160 miles and over 150. 

170 miles and over 160. 

180 miles and over 170. 

190 miles and over 180. 

200 miles and over 190. 



210 miles 
220 miles 
230 miles 
240 miles 
250 miles 
260 miles 
270 miles 
280 miles 
300 miles 
320 miles 
340 miles 
360 miles 
380 miles 
400 miles 
420 miles 
440 miles 
460 miles 
480 miles 
500 miles 



and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 
and over 



200. 
210.. 
220. 
230. 
240. 
250. 
260.. 
270. 
280. 
300. 
320. 
340. 
360. 
380. 
400. 
420. 
440. 



*When rates are not shown for the exact distance, the charge shall not exceed the rate for the 
nearest distance. In case where the haul is equidistant the charge shall be that for the next higher 
distance. 

Applicable to all common carriers of the State having over seventy-five 
miles of rail within the State, except where other specific rates are approved 
by the Commission. 
By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

August 5, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 251 (cancels Circular No. 246). 



148 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 



RATES ON COTTON SEED AND COTTONSEED HULLS, CARLOAD 20,000 
POUNDS MINIMUM, IN CENTS PER TON 2,000 POUNDS 



Distance 


C. L. 

Rate 


L. C. L. 

Packed 
Rate 


Distance 


C. L. 

Rate 


L. C. L. 

Packed 
Rate 


7 miles and under 


$ 0.90 


$ 1.02 


190 miles and over 180 


8 2.14 


$ 2.59 


12 miles and over 7 


1.02 


1.24 


200 miles and over 190. 


2.14 


2.59 


17 miles and over 12 _. 


1.13 


1.47 


210 miles and over 200 


2.14 


2.70 


22 miles and over 17.. 


1.13 


1.47 


220 miles and over 210 


2.14 


2.70 


27 miles and over 22. 


1.24 


1.58 


230 miles and over 220 


2.25 


2.82 


32 miles and over 27 


1.24 


1.58 


240 miles and over 230 


2.25 


2.82 


37 miles and over 32 


1.35 


1.69 


250 miles and over 240 


2.37 


2.93 


42 miles and over 37 


1.35 


1.69 


260 miles and over 250 


2.37 


2.93 


47 miles and over 42. . .. 


1.47 


1.80 


270 miles and over 260 


2.37 


3.04 


52 miles and over 47.. . 


1.47 


1.80 


280 miles and over 270 


2.37 


3.04 


57 miles and over 52.. .. .. 


1.47 


1.80 


290 miles and over 280 


2.48 


3.04 




1.58 
1.58 
1.58 


1.80 
1.92 
1.92 


300 miles and over 290 

310 miles and over 300 

320 miles and over 310 


2.48 
2.59 
2.59 


3.04 




3.15 


72 miles and over 67 


3.15 


77 miles and over 72 


1.58 


2.03 


330 miles and over 320 


2.59 


3.27 




1.58 
1.69 
1.69 
1.80 
1.80 


2.03 
2.14 
2.14 
2.25 
2.25 


340 miles and over 330 

350 miles and over 340 

360 miles and over 350 

370 miles and over 360 

380 miles and over 370. 


2.59 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 
2.70 


3.27 




3.38 




3.38 




3.38 


100 miles and over 97 


3.38 


110 miles and over 100 


1.80 


2.25 


390 miles and over 380 


2.82 


3.49 


120 miles and over 110 


1.80 


2.25 


400 miles and over 390. 


2.82 


.3.49 


130 miles and over 120 


1.92 


2.37 


410 miles and over 400 


2.93 


3.60 


140 miles and over 130 


1.92 


2.37 


420 miles and over 410 


2.93 


3.60 


150 miles and over 140 


2.03 


2.48 


430 miles and over 420 


2.93 


3.72 


160 miles and over 150 


2.03 


2.48 


440 miles and over 430 


2.93 


3.72 


170 miles and over 160 


2.03 


2.59 


450 miles and over 440 


3.04 


3.83 


180 miles and over 170 


2.03 


2.59 









Applicable for single-line haul to all common carriers of the State, except 
where other specific rates are approved by the Commission. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

May 15, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 247 (cancels Circular No. 232). 



FREIGHT RATES 



149 



RATES ON COTTON SEED AND COTTONSEED HULLS, CARLOAD 20,000 
POUNDS MINIMUM (SEE NOTE), IN CENTS PER TON 2,000 POUNDS 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 


Rate 
Joint 
Haul 


90 


125 


102 


137 


113 


148 


113 


148 


124 


159 


124 


159 


135 


170 


135 


170 


147 


182 


147 


182 


147 


182 


158 


193 


158 


193 


158 


193 


158 


193 


158 


193 


169 


204 


169 


204 


180 


215 


180 


215 


180 


215 


180 


215 


192 


227 


192 


227 


203 


238 


203 


238 


203 


238 


203 


238 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 



Rate 
Joint 
Haul 



7 miles and 

12 miles and 

17 miles and 

22 miles and 

27 miles and 

32 miles and 

37 miles and 

42 miles and 

47 miles and 

52 miles and 

57 miles and 

62 miles and 

67 miles and 

72 miles and 

77 miles and 

82 miles and 

87 miles and 

92 miles and 

97 miles and 

100 miles and 

110 miles and 

120 miles and 

130 miles and 

140 miles and 

150 miles and 

160 miles and 

170 miles and 

180 miles and 



under... 
over 7.. 
over 12. 
over 17. 
over 22. 
over 27. 
over 32. 
over 37. 
over 42. 
over 47- 
over 52. 
over 57. 
over 62. 
over 67. 
over 72. 
over 77. 
over 82. 
over 87. 
over 92. 
over 97. 
over 100 
over 110 
over 120 
over 130 
over 140 
over 150 
over 160 
over 170 



190 
200 
210 
220 
230 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
390 
400 
410 
420 
430 
440 
450 



miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 



over 180 
over 190 
over 200 
over 210 
over 220 
over 230 
over 240 
over 250 
over 260 
over 270 
over 280. 
over 290. 
over 300. 
over 310. 
over 320. 
over 330. 
over 340. 
over 350. 
over 360. 
over 370. 
over 380. 
over 390. 
over 400. 
over 410. 
over 420. 
over 430. 
over 440. 



214 
214 
214 
214 
225 
225 
237 
237 
237 
237 
248 
248 
259 
259 
259 
259 
270 
270 
270 
270 
282 
282 
293 
293 
293 
293 
304 



249 
249 
249 
249 
260 
260 
272 
272 
272 
272 
283 
283 
294 
294 
294 
294 
305 
305 
305 
305 
317 
317 
328 
328 
328 
328 



Applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B and C. (See Circulars Nos. 
252 and 253.) 

Note. — Rates on these commodities, less carload, packed, will be 20 per cent 
higher than carload rates. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Seuf, 

March 1, 1924. Cleric. 

Circular No. 258 (cancels Circular No. 247). 



150 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EXPRESS COMPANIES REQUIRED TO GIVE NOTICE OF NONDELIVERY 
OF FRESH FISH SHIPMENTS 

All express companies operating in this State, and which hold themselves 
out as carriers of fresh fish, shall give notice to the consignor of the failure or 
refusal of the consignee to receive such shipments when the same have re- 
mained on hand four hours during daylight after arriving at point of destina- 
tion, said notice to be given by filing a telegram to that effect with a telegraph 
company doing a commercial business between points of origin and destination : 
Provided, that it shall not be necessary to give such notice unless the carrier 
is directed by the shipper so to do in writing or printing attached to the 
package. 

This shall not apply where there is no commercial telegraph office open for 
business at either initial or destination point at the expiration of the time 
fixed herein. 

Should the carrier sell such shipments on the order of the shipper in any 
manner not pointed out by law, it shall be entitled to a commission for such 
services of ten per cent of the amount realized. 

The carrier shall not await answer to its said telegram to the shipper longer 
than two hours, after which time it shall act in reference to said shipments 
in accordance with its duty under the law. 

Should the said shipment perish or become damaged because of the carrier's 
observance of the requirements of this order, it shall not be liable in damages 
therefor, if not otherwise at fault. 

The carrier shall re-ice such shipments only when directed to do so by the 
shipper, and when it is practicable so to do ; and when shipments are re-iced, 
same shall be done at actual cost and at the expense of the shipper. 

The shipper shall pay the going and return charges on shipments which are 
returned under this order, together with the telegraph tolls. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

April 5, 1923. . • . ---.,, Clerk. 

Circular No. 248. 



FREIGHT KATES 



151 



RATES ON MARBLE, GRANITE AND STONE (CRUSHED OR RUBBLE), 
STONE SCREENINGS, GRAVEL (WASHED) AND SAND IN STRAIGHT 
OR MIXED CARLOADS, CARLOAD MINIMUM WEIGHT 90 PER CENT 
OF MARKED CAPACITY OF CAR, EXCEPT WHEN CARS ARE LOADED 
TO THEIR VISIBLE CAPACITY THE ACTUAL WEIGHT WILL GOV- 
ERN, PER TON OF 2,000 POUNDS. 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 


Rate 
Joint 
Haul 


50 


70 


57 


77 


60 


80 


63 


83 


66 


86 


70 


90 


73 


93 


76 


96 


80 


100 


83 


103 


86 


106 


89 


109 


93 


113 


96 


116 


99 


119 


102 


122 


105 


125 


109 


129 


112 


132 


115 


135 


118 


135 


121 


136 


124 


139 


127 


142 


130 


145 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 



Rate 
Joint 
Haul 



5 miles and under... 

10 miles and over 5.. 

15 miles and over 10. 

20 miles and over 15. 

25 miles and over 20. 

30 miles and over 25. 

35 miles and over 30. 

40 miles and over 35. 

45 miles and over 40. 

50 miles and over 45. 

55 miles and over 50. 

60 miles and over 55. 

65 miles and over 60. 

70 miles and over 65. 

75 miles and over 70. 

80 miles and over 75. 

85 miles and over 80. 

90 miles and over 85. 

95 miles and over 90. 
100 miles and over 95. 
110 miles and over 100 
120 miles and over 110 
130 miles and over 120 
140 miles and over 130 
150 miles and over 140 



miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 



over 150. 
over 160. 
over 170. 
over 180. 
over 190. 
over 200. 
over 210. 
over 220. 
over 230. 
over 240 
over 250. 
over 260. 
over 270 
over 280. 
over 290 
over 300 
over 310 
over 320 
over 330 
over 340 
over 350 
over 360 
over 370 
over 380 
over 390 



132 
134 
136 
138 
140 
142 
144 
146 
148 
150 
152 
154 
156 
158 
160 
162 
164 
166 
168 
170 
172 
174 
176 
178 



147 
149 
151 
153 
155 
155 
155 
156 
158 
160 
162 
164 
166 
168 
170 
172 
174 
176 
178 
180 
182 
184 
186 
188 
190 



These rates apply between all points in North Carolina on the lines of the 
Atlantic Coast Line, Carolina. Clinchfield and Ohio Railway, Carolina and 
Northwestern Railway, Norfolk Southern- Railroad, Norfolk and Western 
Railway, Seaboard Air Line, Southern Railway, Asheville and Craggy Mountain 
Railway, Asheville and Southern Railway, Atlantic and Yadkin Railway, 
Carolina and Tennessee Southern Railway, High Point, Randleman and Ashe- 
boro Southern Railroad, Yadkin Railroad, Randolph and Cumberland Railway, 
Winston- Salem Southbound Railway, except where other specific rates are 
approved by the Commission. For basis for joint rates with short lines, see 
our Circular No. 219. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

July 1, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 249 (cancels Circular No. 234). 



152 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



RATES ON MARBLE, GRANITE AND STONE (CRUSHED OR RUBBLE), 
STONE SCREENINGS, GRAVEL (WASHED), SLAG, CHERT AND SAND 
IN STRAIGHT OR MIXED CARLOADS, CARLOAD MINIMUM WEIGHT 
90 PER CENT OF MARKED CAPACITY OF CAR, EXCEPT WHEN CARS 
ARE LOADED TO THEIR VISIBLE CAPACITY THE ACTUAL WEIGHT 
WILL GOVERN, IN CENTS PER TON OF 2,000 POUNDS. 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 


Rate 
Joint 
Haul 


50 


70 


57 


77 


60 


80 


63 


83 


66 


86 


70 


90 


73 


93 


76 


96 


80 


100 


83 


103 


86 


106 


89 


109 


93 


113 


96 


116 


99 


119 


102 


122 


105 


125 


109 


129 


112 


132 


115 


135 


118 


135 


121 


136 


124 


139 


127 


142 


130 


145 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 



Rate 
Joint 
Haul 



5 miles and 
10 miles and 
15 miles and 
20 miles and 
25 miles and 
30 miles and 
35 miles and 
40 miles and 
45 miles and 
50 miles and 
55 miles and 
60 miles and 
65 miles and 
70 miles and 
75 miles and 
80 miles and 
85 miles and 
90 miles and 
95 miles and 
100 miles and 
110 miles and 
120 miles and 
130 miles and 
140 miles and 
150 miles and 



under. „ 
over 5... 
over 10... 
over 15. 
over 20.. 
over 25., 
over 30.. 
over 35. 
over 40. 
over 45. 
over 50. 
over 55. 
over 60. 
over 65. 
over 70. 
over 75. 
over 80. 
over 85. 
over 90. 
over 95. 
over 100 
over 110 
over 120 
over 130 
over 140 



miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 



and over 150. 
and over 160. 
and over 170 
and over 180. 
and over 190 
and over 200. 
and over 210. 
and over 220 
and over 230 
and over 240 
and over 250 
and over 260 
and over 270 
and over 280 
and over 290 
and over 300 
and over 310 
and over 320 
and over 330 
and over 340 
and over 350 
and over 360 
and over 370 
and over 380 
and over 390 



132 
134 
136 
138 
140 
142 
144 
146 
148 
150 
152 
154 
156 
158 
160 
162 
164 
166 
168 
170 
172 
174 
176 
178 



147 
149 
151 
153 
155 
155 
155 
156 
158 
160 
162 
164 



170 
172 
174 
176 
178 
180 
182 
184 



190 



Applicable to common carriers in Groups A, B and C ; also Randolph and 

Cumberland Railway and Washington and Vandemere Railroad. (See Circu- 
lars Nos. 252 and 253.) 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

March 15, 1924. Clerk. 

Circular No. 259 (cancels Circular No. 249). 



FREIGHT RATES 153 



CORPORATION COMMISSION v. COMMON CARRIERS BY RAIL IN 
NORTH CAROLINA 

In order to clarify an apparent misconception on the part of the common 
carriers of the State as to the proper method for arriving at correct rates now 
applicable on certain commodities named in Agent Kelly's Freight Tariff, 
No. 228, I. C. C, U. S. 1, when handled on combination rates over two or more 
lines within the State: It is 

Ordered, That the rules and arbitraries set out in Agent Kelly's Freight 
Tariff, No. 228, I. C. C, U. S. 1, for arriving at combination rates on the com- 
modities named in said tariff shall, until further ordered, apply to intrastate 
traffic in North Carolina. It is 

Further ordered, That the principles for arriving at combination rates as 
set out in the said tariff are to be applied in connection with legally estab- 
lished rates of the carriers in this State, that is, after statutory deductions 
(when required) for joint traffic have been made. (See Note.) It is 

Further ordered, That these rules shall apply to rates made on combination 
between all common carriers by rail within the State. 

Note. — First deduct the arbitraries shown in Kelly's Tariff, then apply the 
statutory deductions, after which add back arbitraries as per Kelly's Tariff, 
but in no case shall combination rates so made be less than can be made by 
use of joint-line scale for short-line distance between same points. 

By order of the Commission : R. O. Self, 

August 5, 1923. Clerk. 

Circular No. 250 (cancels Circular No. 219). 



154 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



PETROLEUM OIL AND ITS PRODUCTS, C. L., RATED 5TH CLASS IN 
SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION, IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 



Distance 



Rate 


Rate 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Haul 


8* 


Hi 


ii* 


14 


13 


15* 


14 


16 


15| 


171 


16 


18$ 


16 


18| 


17| 


20 


171 


20 


18| 


20* 


18| 


20| 


20 


22 


20 


22 


20* 


23 


20| 


23 


22 


24| 


22 


24* 


22 


24* 


23 


25 


23 


25 


23 


25 


24* 


26* 


24* 


26| 


25 


27* 


25 


27* 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 



Rate 
Joint 
Haul 



5 miles and 
10 miles and 
15 miles and 
20 miles and 
25 miles and 
30 miles and 
35 miles and 
40 miles and 
45 miles and 
50 miles and 
55 miles and 
60 miles and 
65 miles and 
70 miles and 
75 miles and 
80 miles and 
85 miles and 
90 miles and 
95 miles and 
100 miles and 
110 miles and 
120 miles and 
130 miles and 
140 miles and 
150 miles and 



under... 
over 5... 
over 10. 
over 15. 
over 20. 
over 25. 
over 30. 
over 35. 
over 40. 
over 45. 
over 50. 
over 55. 
over 60. 
over 65. 
over 70. 
over 75. 
over 80. 
over 85. 
over 90 _ 
over 95. 
over 100 
over 110 
over 120 
over 130 
over 140 



miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 
miles and 



over 150 
over 160 
over 170 
over 180 
over 190 
over 200 
over 210 
over 220 
over 230 
over 240 
over 250 
over 260 
over 270 
over 280 
over 300 
over 320 
over 340 
over 360 
over 380 
over 400 
over 420 
over 440 
over 460 
over 480 



26| 

27| 

27* 

29 

29§ 

29| 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

31 

32 

32 

32 

32 

33* 

33| 

34 

34 

34 

35 

35 



29 

29| 

29| 

31 

32 

32 

33| 

33i 

33* 

33* 

33| 

33* 

33| 

34 

34 

34 

34 

35* 

35* 

36* 

36* 

36* 

38 

38 



Applicable to common carriers in Groups A and B. 
252 and 253.) 

By order of the Commission : 
February 10, 1924. 

Circular No. 256. 



(See Circulars Nos. 

R. O. Self, 

Clerk. 



FREIGHT KATES 



155 



MOLASSES IN BARRELS OR HOGSHEADS, IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS 



Distance 



Rate 


Rate 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Haul 


6 


7 


7 


84 


8 


9 


84 


10| 


9 


11 


10| 


HI 


11 


114 


HI 


13 


ltt 


13| 


13 


14 


13 


14 


14 


16 


14 


16 


16 


17 


16 


17 


17 


18| 


17 


18| 


181 


20 


181 


20 


20 


21| 


21| 


22| 


22| 


24| 


24| 


25 


25 


27 


25 


27 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 



Rate 
Joint 
Haul 



5 miles and 
10 miles and 
15 miles and 
20 miles and 
25 miles and 
30 miles and 
35 miles and 
40 miles and 
45 miles and 
50 miles and 
55 miles and 
60 miles and 
65 miles and 
70 miles and 
75 miles and 
80 miles and 
85 miles and 
90 miles and 
95 miles and 
100 miles and 
110 miles and 
120 miles and 
130 miles and 
140 miles and 
150 miles and 



under— 
over 5.. 
over 10. 
over 15. 
over 20. 
over 25.. 
over 30. 
over 35. 
over 40. 
over 45. 
over 50. 
over 55. 
over 60. 
over 65. 
over 70.. 
over 75. 
over 80. 
over 85. 
over 90. 
over 95. 
over 100 
over 110 
over 120 
over 130 
over 140 



160 miles and 
170 miles and 
180 miles and 
190 miles and 
200 miles and 
210 miles and 
220 miles and 
230 miles and 
240 miles and 
250 miles and 
260 miles and 
270 miles and 
280 miles and 
300 miles and 
320 miles and 
340 miles and 
360 miles and 
380 miles and 
400 miles and 
420 miles and 
440 miles and 
460 miles and 
480 miles and 
500 miles and 



over 150 
over 160 
over 170 
over 180 
over 190 
over 200 
over 210 
over 220 
over 230 
over 240 
over 250 
over 260 
over 270 
over 280 
over 300 
over 320 
over 340 
over 360 
over 380 
over 400 
over 420 
over 440 
over 460 
over 480 



27 

27 

28| 

28| 

28| 

29| 

29| 

29| 

31 

31 

31 

31 

33 

33 

33 

34 

34 

34 

35| 

35| 

354 

35| 

364 

364 



284 

284 

294 

294 

294 

31 

31 

31 

33 

33 

33 

33 

34 

34 

34 

354 

354 

354 

364 

364 

364 

364 

384 

384 



Applicable to common carriers in Group A and B. 
252 and 253.) 

By order of the Commission : 
February 10, 1924. 

Circular No. 257. 



(See Circulars Nos. 

R. O. Self, 
Clerk. 



156 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 



STONE, MARBLE, GRANITE, VIZ.: CURBING OR PAVING BLOCKS, 
BUILDING: DIMENSION OR RANDOM, ROUGH QUARRIED OR 
DRESSED, NOT POLISHED OR CARVED. CARLOAD MINIMUM 50,000 
POUNDS PER TON 2,000 POUNDS. 



Distance 



Single 
Line 


Joint 
Haul 


80 


100 


87 


107 


90 


110 


93 


113 


96 


116 


100 


120 


103 


123 


106 


126 


110 


130 


113 


130 


116 


136 


119 


139 


123 


143 


126 


146 


129 


149 


132 


152 


135 


155 


139 


159 


142 


162 


145 


165 


148 


165 


151 


166 


154 


169 


157 


172 


160 


175 



Distance 



Single 
Line 



Joint 
Haul 



5 miles and 
10 miles and 
15 miles and 
20 miles and 
25 miles and 
30 miles and 
35 miles and 
40 miles and 
45 miles and 
50 miles and 
55 miles and 
60 miles and 
65 miles and 
70 miles and 
75 miles and 
80 miles and 
85 miles and 
90 miles and 
95 miles and 
100 miles and 
110 miles and 
120 miles and 
130 miles and 
140 miles and 
150 miles and 



under... 
over 5.. 
over 10. 
over 15. 
over 20. 
over 25- 
over 30. 
over 35. 
over 40. 
over 45. 
over 50. 
over 55. 
over 60. 
over 65. 
over 70. 
over 75. 
over 80. 
over 85. 
over 90. 
over 95. 
over 100 
over 110 
over 120 
over 130 
over 140 



miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 
miles 



and over 150 
and over 160 
and over 170 
and over 180 
and over 190 
and over 200 
and over 210 
and over 220 
and over 230 
and over 240 
and over 250 
and over 260 
and over 270 
and over 280 
and over 290 
and over 300 
and over 310 
and over 320 
and over 330 
and over 340 
and over 350 
and over 360 
and over 370 
and over 380 
and over 390 



164 
166 
168 
170 
172 
174 
176 
178 
180 
182 
184 
186 
189 
190 
192 
194 
196 
199 
200 
202 
204 
206 
209 
210 



177 
179 
181 
183 
185 
185 
185 
186 
188 
190 
192 
194 



200 
202 
204 
206 
208 
210 
212 
214 
216 
218 
220 



Applicable to lines named in Groups A, B and C. 
Also Montgomery Lumber Company Railroad. 
By order of the Commission : 
Effective July 1, 1924. 

Circular No. 260. 



(See Circular No. 253.) 

R. O. Self, 

Clerk. 



FREIGHT RATES 



157 



KATES ON HEAVY LOAD-BEARING CONCRETE BLOCKS WITHOUT 
ORNAMENTAL FACE, CARLOAD MINIMUM 50,000 POUNDS, IN CENTS 
PER 100 POUNDS. 



Distance 



Rate 


Rate 


Single 


Joint 


Line 


Line 


3^ 


41 


4§ 


51 


' 4| 


51 


41 


5* 


4* 


oh 


5 


6 


5 


6 


5 


6 


5 


6 


5* 


6^ 


o\ 


6* 


5* 


61 


5* 


6^ 


6 


7 


6 


7 


6 


7 


6 


7 


6* 


71 



Distance 



Rate 
Single 
Line 



Rate 
Joint 
Line 



7 

12 miles 
17 miles 
22 miles 
27 miles 
32 miles 
37 miles 
42 miles 
47 miles 
52 miles 
57 miles 
62 miles 
67 miles 
72 miles 
77 miles 
82 miles 
87 miles 
92 miles 



and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 
and 



under., 
over 7. 
over 12 
over 17 
over 22 
over 27 
over 32 
over 37 
over 42 
over 47 
over 52 
over 57 
over 62 
over 67 
over 72 
over 77 
over 82 
over 87 



97 miles 
100 miles 
120 miles 
130 miles 
140 miles 
160 miles 
180 miles 
200 miles 
220 miles 
240 miles 
260 miles 
280 miles 
300 miles 
320 miles 
340 miles 
360 miles 
380 miles 
400 miles 



and over 92.. 
and over 97. . 
and over 100. 
and over 120- 
and over 130. 
and over 140 
and over 160. 
and over 180. 
and over 200. 
and over 220. 
and over 240. 
and over 260. 
and over 280. 
and over 300. 
and over 320 
and over 340. 
and over 360. 
and over 380. 



61 
61 

7 
7 
7 
7 

8 

Sh 

9 

n 

10 
10| 

11 

11* 

m 

12 



9§ 
10 
10-1 
10| 

11 

11* 

12 
12| 
12* 
13 



Applicable to lines named in Groups A, 
and 253.) 
By order of the Commission : 
Effective September 20, 1924. 

Circular No. 262. 



B and C. (See Circulars Nos. 252 

R. O. Self, 

Clerk. 



158 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



WOOD, FIRE OR CORD, C. L., IN CENTS PER CORD 

Carload Minimum 

In cars, inside length under 36 feet 12 cords 

In cars, inside length 36 feet „ 14 cords 

In cars, inside length 38 feet and over 36 feet 15 cords 

In cars, inside length 40 feet and over 38 feet 16 cords 

In cars, inside length over 40 feet 17 cords 



Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 


Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 




70 
70 
78| 
84| 
84| 
99 
112| 




127 






141§ 

155 








130 miles and over 110 


169 




182^ 

197 

















Applicable to lines named in Groups A, B and C. 
and 253.) 

By order of the Commission : 
Effective October 1, 1924. 



(See Circulars Nos. 252 



R. O. 



Self, 
Clerk. 



Circular No. 263 (cancels Circulars Nos. 152 and 176). 






FREIGHT RATES 



159 



WOOD, FIRE OR CORD (FOR FUEL PURPOSES), C. L., IN CENTS 

PER CORD 

Carload Minimum 

In cars, inside length under 36 feet 12 cords 

In cars, inside length 36 feet 14 cords 

In cars, inside length 38 feet and over 36 feet 15 cords 

In cars, inside length 40 feet and over 38 feet 16 cords 

Id cars, inside length over 40 feet 17 cords 



Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 


Distance 


Rate 
Single 
Line 




70 
70 
78^ 
84f 
84| 
99 
112| 




127 






141| 

155 










169 






182| 
197 

















Applicable to lines named in Groups A, B and C. 
and 253.) 
By order of the Commission : 
Effective October 1, 1924. 

Circular No. 265 (caucels Circular No. 263). 



(See Circulars Nos. 252 






R. O. Self, 

Clerk. 



160 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CEMENT, NATURAL OR PORTLAND (BUILDING CEMENT), CARLOAD, 
IN BULK OF IN PACKAGES, AS PROVIDED FOR CARLOAD SHIP- 
MENTS IN THE SOUTHERN CLASSIFICATION, MINIMUM WEIGHT 
50,000 POUNDS, EXCEPT THAT WHEN, FOR CARRIER'S CONVEN- 
IENCE, A CAR OF LESS CAPACITY IS FURNISHED. THE MINIMUM 
WEIGHT WILL BE THE MARKED CAPACITY OF CAR, BUT NOT 
LESS THAN 40,000 POUNDS. IN CENTS PER 100 POUNDS. 



Distance 


Single 
Line 


Joint 
Line 


Distance 


Single 

Line 


Joint 
Line 




4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 


5 

6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 




13 

14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 


13 




170 miles and over 138 

210 miles and over 170 


14 




15 




16 






17 




330 miles and over 290 


18 




370 miles and over 330 . 


19 






20 






21 









Applicable to lines named in Groups A, 
and 253.) 
By order of the Commission : 
Effective December 1, 1924. 



B and C. (See Circulars Nos. 252 



R. O. 



Self, 
Clerk. 



Circular No. 266 (cancels Circular No. 241). 



PART TWO 



COMPILATION FROM ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORTS OF ALL RAILROAD COMPANIES OPERATING 

IN NORTH CAROLINA, SHOWING CAPITALIZATION, OPERATING REVENUES, ETC., 

FOR YEARS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1922 AND 1923. 



Part II— 1 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY 

Compilation of Railroad Returns for the Years Ending December 31, 1922 and 1923 
PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




J. R. Kenly . 


Wilmington, N. C. 






Wilmington, N. C. 






George B. Elliott . 


Wilmington, N. C. 




R. A. Brand .. . . 








New York, N. Y. 




P. R. Albright 


Wilmington, N. C. 




T. F. Darden 


Wilmington, N. C. 




H. L. Borden 


New York, N. Y. 




John T. Reid 


Wilmington, N. C. 




George B. Elliott 


Wilmington, N. C. 




H. C. Prince 


Wilmington, N. C. 


General Manager .... .. . _ . 


P. R. Albright 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Chief Engineer . . _ .... 


J. E. Willoughby 


Wilmington, N. C. 




C. J. Joseph .. 

R. D. Hawkins 




General Superintendent Motive Power... 


Wilmington, N. C. 



DIRECTORS 

H. Walters, New York, N. Y. ; George C. Jenkins, Baltimore, Md. ; Waldo Newcomer, 
Baltimore, Md. ; J. J. Nelligan, Baltimore, Md. ; F. B. Adams, New York, N. Y. ; F. W. 
Scott, Richmond, Va. ; F. K. Borden, Goldsboro, N. C. ; Lyman Delano, Wilmington, N. C. ; 
George B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C. ; Donald McRae, Wilmington, N. C. ; W. W. MacKall, 
Savannah, Ga. ; H. L. Borden, New York, N. Y. ; J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C. 



HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report: Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany. 

2. Date of organization : The existing records of the company do not show the date of 
organization. The organization was doubtless effected soon after March 14, 1836, the date 
that the charter was granted by the General Assembly of Virginia. 

3. Under laws of what government, state or territory organized? If more than one, 
name them. Give reference to each statute and all amendments thereof: 

Chartered and organized as Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Company by and under 
an act of the General Assembly of Virginia passed March 14, 1836, being chapter 121 of the 
Acts of 1835-36. Amended by Acts of the General Assembly of Virginia as follows : Chapter 
51, session 1853-54, passed February 18, 1854 ; chapter 218, session 1865-66, passed December 
12, 1865 ; chapter 74, session 1866-67, passed January 16, 1867 ; chapter 17, session 1869-70, 
approved March 5, 1870 ; chapter 635, session 1897-98, approved March 1, 1898 ; chapter 18, 
session 1899-1900, approved January 12, 1900. 

Under the Act of the General Assembly of Virginia approved March 1, 1898, the Richmond 
and Petersburg Railroad Company purchased by deed from the Petersburg Railroad Company 
all of the property, rights, powers, privileges and franchises of the said Petersburg Railroad 
Company, which then became merged into the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Company. 
The Petersburg Railroad Company had been chartered by an act of the General Assembly 
of Virginia passed February 10, 1830. Under the authority of said Act of March 1, 1898, 
the name of the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad Company was, November 21, 1898, 
changed to Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company of Virginia. April 21, 1900, the railroads, 
property, appurtenances and franchises of the Norfolk and Carolina Railroad Company, the 
Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Company, and the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company 
of South Carolina were merged with and sold to the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company 



4 ■ N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

of Virginia, and the name of the company was changed to Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 
Company ; all under authority of said act of the General Assembly of Virginia, approved 
January 12, 1900, and chapter 105 of the Private Laws of North Carolina, session 1899, 
ratified February 24, 1899, and article 3 of chapter 51 of the Civil Statute Laws of South 
Carolina, and chapter 50 of the Statutes at Large of South Carolina, approved March 9, 1896. 

The Norfolk and Carolina Railroad Company had been incorporated as the Chowan and 
Southern Railroad Company by act of the General Assembly of Virginia approved May 
5, 1887, and under an amendment approved January 27, 1888, the name was changed to 
Norfolk and Carolina Railroad Company. The Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Company 
had been chartered as the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad Company by an act of the General 
Assembly of North Carolina ratified January 3, 1834, and under an amendment ratified 
February 14, 1855, the name was changed to Wilmington and Weldon Railroad Company. 
The Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company of South Carolina had been chartered by an act 
of the General Assembly of South Carolina approved March 5, 1887. Under articles of 
agreement, consolidation and merger, made and entered into April 10, 1902, all of the 
capital stock, property and franchise of the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Com- 
pany were merged with and sold to the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company. The said 
merger and sale of said properties of Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company 
being into the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company, which was then and there a Virginia 
corporation, and being made on the part of the Atlantic Coast Line Company, under 
authority of its charter, the said acts of the General Assembly of Virginia, approved 
January 12, 1900, which said charter limited its actions thereunder to the acquisition by it 
of other railroad companies, by way of merger of such other railroad into their absorption 
by it, the said Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, and being authorized on the part of the other 
States in which the lines of the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company were 
incorporated by various statutes providing for and authorizing the merger, sale, and 
acquisition of such lines by other railroad companies, and in particular by article 3 of 
chapter 50 of the Code of South Carolina of 1902, and section 2179 of the Code of Georgia 
of 1895, and section 2248 of the Code of Florida, 1892, and chapter 4615, Laws of Florida 
of 1897, approved June 5, 1897, and section 1169 of the Code of Alabama of 1896, as amended 
by the acts approved February 7th, Laws of 1899. The Savannah, Florida and Western 
Railway Company had been chartered November 25, 1879, under the provisions of a general 
act of the Legislature of the State of Georgia, approved February 29, 1876, and this charter 
was amended by an act of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia approved September 
13, 1891. 

Since April, 1902, the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company has lawfully acquired the 
property rights, powers, privileges and franchises of the following companies : 

St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad Company, by deed dated June 12, 1902. This company 
on June 8, 1896, filed application for charter under the laws of the State of Florida, and 
this charter was issued on September 5, 1896. The purchase of this property was made 
under authority of said act of the General Assembly of Virginia of January 12, 1900, and 
section 2246 of the Revised Statutes of Florida, 1892, and chapter 4615 of the Laws of 
Florida, 1897, approved June 5, 1897. 

The Florida Southern Railroad Company, by deed dated March 19, 1903. This company 
on April 27, 1892, filed application for charter under the general laws of Florida, and on 
the same date this charter was issued. The purchase of this property was made under the 
same authority as in the case of St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad Company. 

The Sanford and St. Petersburg Railroad Company, by deed dated March 19, 1903. This 
company on August 12, 1893, filed application for charter under the general laws of Florida, 
and this charter was issued October 26, 1893, and amended January 21, 1901. The purchase 
of this property was made under the same authority as in the case of St. Johns and Lake 
Eustis Railroad Company. 

Jacksonville and Southwestern Railroad Company, by deed dated July 28, 1904. This 
company on February 4, 1899, filed application for charter under the general laws of Florida, 
and this charter was issued March 11, 1899, and amended by certificate filed with and ap- 
proved by the Secretary of State of Florida May 9, 1900. The purchase of this property 
was made under the same authority as in the case of St. Johns and Lake Eustis Railroad 
Company. 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 

The Winston and Bone Valley Railroad Company, by deed dated February 18, 1909. This 
company on December 21, 1892, filed application for charter under the general laws of the 
State of Florida, and this charter was issued on the same date. The purchase of this 
property was made under authority of said act of the General Assembly of Virginia of 
January 12, 1900, and sections 2812 and 2815 of the General Statutes of Florida, 1906. 

The Conway, Coast and Western Railroad Company, by deed dated July 1, 1912. This 
company was incorporated as the Conway and Seashore Railroad Company by an act of the 
General Assembly of South Carolina approved February 28, 1899. Under authority of the 
General Laws of South Carolina, the Secretary of State of South Carolina on July 28, 1904, 
granted an amendment of the charter and under said amendment the name of the company 
was changed to Conway, Coast and Western Railroad Company. The purchase of this 
property was made under authority of said act of the General Assembly of Virginia approved 
January 12, 1900, and No. 446 of the acts of the General Assembly of South Carolina, 
session of 1912. 

Property of Sanford and Everglades Railroad Company, except its franchise, by deed of 
October 15, 1913. This company was incorporated July 31, 1908, under the laws of the State 
of Florida. The purchase of this property was made under authority of said act of the 
General Assembly of Virginia of January 12, 1900, and sections 2812 and 2815 of the 
General Statutes of the State of Florida, 1906, as amended. 

Property formerly belonging to the Florida Central Railroad Company between Fincher 
and Fanlew, in Florida, which was sold under foreclosure and conveyed to this company by 
deed, dated February 27, 1915, from the purchaser at said foreclosure sale. The purchase 
of this property was made under authority of said act of General Assembly of Virginia 
approved January 12, 1900, and sections 2812 and 2815 of the General Statutes of Florida, 
1906, as amended. 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$205,157,102.56 


Investments: 
Investment in road and equipment. . . 


$207,599,638.56 
72,863.59 


$ 223,066,333.45 


70,234.46 


Improvements on leased railway property 


110,708.16 
22,768.28 




Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 


5,657.13 
1,397,567.94 

57,712,801.41 
4,758,105.76 
3,866,036.68 

. 1,065,843.89 

81,671.25 

1,550,000.00 

226,557.85 

1,442,836.19 


2,592.53 


1,272,847.68 


1,559,396.45 


57,624,541.41 


Investments in affiliated companies — 


58,183,351.41 


4,745,605.76 




4,758,105.76 


5,171,076.04 


Notes. . ._ .. ... . _ . 


3,929,536.68 


1,071,544.82 




1,293,311.83 


119,571.25 


Other investments — 


81,671.25 


1,787,500.00 




3,550,000.00 


284,609.66 


Notes 


213,230.91 


1,162,848.96 




1,577,836.19 








278,467,482.60 


279,779,580.25 


298,348,842.90 




Current Assets: 
Cash . . ... 




14,022,407.48 


23,426,495.07 

1,170,771.40 

4,918.77 

2,480,286.54 

696,481.25 

2,058,358.77 

6,178,497.58 

1,576,604.51 

107,125.07 


12,205,194.94 


1,185,298.52 




1,429,359.18 


105,802.19 




6,343.77 


2,335,044.93 

789,982.60 

2,578,154.94 


Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 


2,447,853.14 

657,791.82 

2,315,282.54 


7,454,612.23 




9,259,393.12 


1,612,608.55 




1,762,158.26 


130,434.82 




45,164.77 








30,214.346.26 


37,699,538.96 


30,128,541.54 




Deferred Assets: 




28,303.84 


22,096.30 

406,018.43 

8,645,749.47 


18,388.80 


384,150.57 




431,816.50 


8,658,951.84 




1,252.88 








9,071,406.25 


9,073,864.20 


451,458.18 




Unadjusted Debits: 




736,505.48 


386,689.83 


436,641.25 




Grand totals 




318,489,740.59 


326,939,673.24 


329,365,483.87 









ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— Continued 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 68,782,900.00 
4,829,442.50 


Stock: 


$ 68,782,900.00 
4,829,442.50 


$ 68,782,900.00 




4,829,442.50 






73,612,342.50 


73,612,342.50 


73,612,342.50 




Long-Term Debt: 




158 173,130.00 


157,447,830.00 


156,722,530.00 




Current Liabilities: 




170,000.00 






1,036,375.10 
4 009,025.58 




1,146,634.39 

4,164,342.29 

448,318.41 

461,870.84 

5,850.75 

3,000.00 

2,400,517.00 

1,493,440.49 

1,356.25 


864,458.60 




5,008,675.32 


624,368.02 




538,573.33 


473,555.84 




451,738.34 


5,850.75 




5,850.75 


6,000.00 




3,000.00 


2,400,517.00 




2,400,517.00 


1,513,261.24 




1,473,623.49 


1,356.25 




1,356.25 






122,915.75 










10,240,309.78 


10,125,330.42 


10,870,708.83 




Deferred Liabilities: 




5,039,301.97 


4,931,707.85 
371,029.03 


5,905.35 


401,799.22 




165,648.96 




Total deferred liabilities 




5,441,101.19 


5,302,736.88 


171,554.31 




Unadjusted Credits: 




1,456,904.84 


2,713,879.46 

554,550.67 

720,408.28 

16,879,712.65 

2,839,933.20 


2,889,335.44 


531,115.06 




576,462.83 


937,130.91 




663,628.82 


16,158,103.61 




17,688,862.41 


2,172,445.19 




973,943.03 








21,255,699.61 


23,708,484.26 


22,794,232.53 




Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and surplus 
Profit and loss __ 




1,062,509.26 
48,704,648.25 


1,302,162.61 

55,440,786.57 


1,690,596.77 
63,503,518.93 








49,767,157.51 


56,742,949.18 


65,194,115.70 




Grandtotals 




318,489,740.59 


326,939,673.24 


329,365,483.87 









N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 







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ATLANTIC COAST LINE EAILROAD 



11 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Freight . __ ... . ... . __ _. . ... 


$48,857,557.94 

15,871,367.42 

132,594.40 

1,382,955.55 

2,581,626.23 

96,700.69 

13,043.78 

383,878.08 

46,547.30 

1,032.00 

717.29 


$ 56,580,484.44 


Passenger 


17,995,083.27 


Excess baggage 


143,894.47 


Mail 


1,239,673.77 




2,658,978.17 


Other passenger-train ... . 


143,278.39 


Milk 


10,383.94 


Switching .. . . .. ... .. 


410,549.22 


Special service train .. ... 


49,835.46 




3,643.00 


Water transfers — freight ......... .. 


437.33 








69,368,020.68 


79,238,241.46 






Dining and buffet 


346,731.89 

59,336.03 

1,275.50 

144,450.44 

2,544.01 

180,079.68 

31,767.82 

564,604.86 


429,761.10 


Station, train, and boat privileges _______ 


59,433.23 


Parcel room . . 


1,707.50 


Storage — freight . 


126,957.79 


Storage — baggage 


3,851.20 


Demurrage... . .... 


307,243.82 


Rents of buildings and other property. .... 


35,729.53 


Miscellaneous 


560,898.34 








1,330,790.23 


1,525,582.51 






Joint facility— Cr ...... ... . 


129,611.76 
5,077.85 


126,036.48 


Joint facility— Dr ... 


7,549.70 






Total joint facility operating revenue 


124,533.91 


118,486.78 








70,823,344.82 


80,882,310.75 







12 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 







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ATLANTIC COAST LINE EAILROAD 



13 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense 
Account 



Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 



Entire Line 



1922 



1923 



Within the State 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other... 

Ties — yard 

Ties — other 

Rails — yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material— yard 

Other track material — other 

B allast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing — yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences — yard 

Right-of-way fences — other 

Crossings and signs — yard 

Crossings and signs — other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stati ons 

Shops and enginehouses 

Grain elevators — depreciation 

Storage warehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Miscellaneous structures 

Paving 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements... 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



404,824.39 

82,704.33 

725,129.13 

667 .03 

669,435.56 

179,942.29 

,179,576.84 

108,612.76 

518,373.99 

107,993.17 

403,954.32 

309 .09 

237,845.95 

303,453.70 

,683,852.38 

155.29 

43,376.52 

10,912.15 

74,475.97 

420,111.73 

80, 779 .97 

131,674.30 

86,806.67 

221,953.66 



$ 446 
97 



743 
212 

1,492 
76 
388 
133 
576 
3 
271 
329 

2,259 

62 

16 

67 

581 , 



,227.74 
, 679 .36 
,362.61 

198.34 
,163.10 
,483.29 
,265.94 
,124.86 
,290.96 
,563.41 
,784.96 
,072.91 
,759.89 
,216.97 
,750.66 

162.53 
,769.65 
,274.50 
,781.56 
,167.41 
,536.73 
,463.44 
,262.57 
,108.25 



104, 
21, 
187, 

173, 

46, 
305, 

28, 
134, 

27, 
104, 

61, 

78, 

436, 

11, 

2, 
19, 
108, 
20, 
34, 
22, 
57, 



897.65 
430.25 
894 .66 
172 .84 
463 .41 
626.45 
650.65 
143.62 
320.50 
983 .07 
672 .20 

80.09 
630.38 
030.59 
317.98 

40.24 
239.68 
827 .94 
298.13 
858 .89 
931.62 
119.30 
493 .25 
512.39 
3.22 



12.43 

196,897.84 

63,864.60 

199,646.88 

8,706.64 

4,196.26 

96,966.55 

102,219.86 

6,238.41 

1,392.61 

40,832.60 

52,454.77 

14,399.11 

3,927.67 



254,988.15 

74,312.58 

187,383.44 

86.40 

8,284.51 

121,311.52 

111,745.01 

2,535.37 

15,950.75 

52,624.05 

55,178.36 

17,292.72 

4,385.46 



51,019.95 

16,548.52 

51,732.28 

2,256.05 

1,087.33 

25,125.87 

26,487.10 

1,616.50 

360 .85 

10,580.50 

13,592.02 

3,731.08 

1,017.73 



Totals 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities— Dr 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other 
facilities — Cr 

Equalisation— way and structures 



8,468,677.42 
183,331.75 
217,053.04 



10,193,980.98 
184,457.60 

272,733.36 

85,584.18 



2,194,394.38 
47,504.72 
56,242.55 



328.01 
026.56 
094 .96 

50.82 
405 .82 
440.34 
333 .46 
503 .95 
484 .03 
220.28 
778 .07 
787.31 
627.60 
348.68 
970.72 

41.64 
082.21 
169.69 
366.31 
900 .90 
733.68 
517.59 
829 .50 
757 .32 



65,330.51 

19,039.63 

48,009.51 

22.14 

2,122.58 

31,081.22 

28,630.19 

649 .59 

4,086.74' 
13,482.81 
14,137.25 

4,430.57 

1,123.60 



2,611,799.87 
47,259.88 



69,877.01 
21,929.52 



Total maintenance of way and struc- 
tures 



8,434,956.13 



10,191,289.40 



2,185,656.55 



2,611,110.26 



14 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense 
Account 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence- 

Sh op machinery >_. 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation... 

Steam locomotives— retirements 

Freight-train cars — repairs 

Freight-train cars — depreciation 

Freight-train cars — retirements 

Passenger-train cars — repairs 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation. 
Passenger-train cars — retirements.. 

Floating equipment — repairs 

Floating equipment — depreciation. 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — retirements 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint equipment at ter- 
minals — Dr 

Maintaining joint equipment at ter- 
minals — Cr 



Total maintenance of equipment. 

Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associ ations. 

Industrial and immigration bureaus. 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing. 

Other expenses 



Totals. 



Transportation — Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains _. 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage 
bureaus 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 



Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 



Entire Line 



1922 



477,246.89 
237,736.50 
644,351.01 

5,962.95 



,556,303.67 

948,661.85 

80,260.24 

,328,438.26 

127,747.69 

1,090.90 

45,170.29 

3,779.74 

137,900.89 

25,238.13 

12,028.54 

54,011.20 

54,297.46 

23,122.39 

14,711.53 



14,262,329.37 
37,454.71 
2,603.53 



14,297,180.55 



433,942.51 

459,714.93 

87,242.20 

38,064.24 

10,997.02 

261.27 

245,920.84 

19.66 



1,276,123.35 



847,486.82 
582,092.25 
,229,807.13 

106,056.45 
284,838.74 
766,497.28 



1923 



$ 457 

459 

5,347 

526 

3 

7,489 

1,060 

50 

1,370 

137 

5 

41 

4 

199 

26 

15 

35 

58 

30 

7 



,314.67 
,433.09 
,217.12 
,502.81 
, 747 .02 
,592.04 
,032.02 
,158.03 
,336.72 
,787.29 
,743.15 
,434.67 
,052.64 
,389.30 
,317.15 
,897.28 
,430.68 
,312.02 
,477.54 
,996.51 



17,308,191.41 

43,885.44 

3,046.63 



17,349,030.22 



497,620.68 

524,190.81 

90,164.38 

43,038.94 

12,364.93 

283 .96 

200,178.02 



1,367,841.72 



914,100.19 

637,693.28 

4,465,172.62 

110,742.08 
302,296.74 
809,655.27 



Within the State 



1922 



$ 123 

61 

1,203 

125 

1 

1,439 

245 

20 

344 

33 

11 

35 
6 
3 

13 
14 
5 
3 



, 602 .02 
,439.12 
,483.31 
,545.11 
,743.29 
,816.22 
,796.95 
,223.46 
,101.84 

282.67 
, 704 .47 

979 .40 
,732.73 
,539.68 
,116.82 
,995.32 
,069.51 
,991.45 
,812.04 



3,695,639.10 

9,705.22 

674 .63 



3,704,669 



112,442.70 

119,120.83 

22,606.10 

9,863.16 

2,849.54 

67.70 

63,722.71 

5.09 



330,667 



219,599.85 

150,831.10 

1,096,022.97 

27,481.23 
73,807.10 
198,613.93 



1923 



$ 117,168.59 

117,711.35 

1,370,010.50 

134,895.28 

960.02 

1,918,908.38 

271,590.80 

12,850.99" 

351,093.97 

35,302.48 

1,471.45 

10,615.98 

1,038.33 

51,085.53 

6,742.72 

4,073.74 

9,077.69 

14,940.12 

7,808.65 

2,048.79 



4,434,531.72 

11,243.89 

780 .58 



4,444,995.03 



127,495.39 

134,302.93 

23,101.02 

11,027.01 

3,168.02 

72.75 

51,287.61 



350,454.73 



234,201.61 

163,383.39 

1,144,021.88 

28,373.23 

77,451.45 

207,441.78 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 



15 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense 
Account 



Transportation— Rail Line— Con. 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — yard. 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses— train 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses... 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to live stock on right of way. 

Loss and damage — freight 

Loss and damage — 
Injuries to persons. 



Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 



Entire Line 



1922 



Totals 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr._ 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr. . 

Total transportation — rail line 

Miscellaneous Operations: 

Dining and buffet service 

General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers-.. 
Salaries and expenses of clerks and attend- 
ants 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 



212,744.84 

14,282.68 

796,717.59 

901,375.53 

31,741.59 

8,170.00 

14,442.83 

297,450.95 

59,033.88 

563,596.37 

182,112.95 

190,489.14 

93,382.21 

73,019.08 

054,591.04 

229,384.11 

893,788.08 

107,713.87 

107,975.88 

29,841.64 

21,861.74 

44,563.19 

180,681.19 

31,788.60 

75,723.68 

156,863.95 

98,441.41 

164,992.13 

700,682.98 

5,972.49 

541,818.88 



25,702,023.17 

706,137.55 

277,069.82 

29,757.35 

142,587.96 



26,018,260.29 



367,960.66 



163,078.42 

804,338.37 

33,725.45 

276,651.65 



1923 



SI, 440, 
17, 

939, 

1,069, 

34, 

14, 

18, 

312, 

62, 

2,888, 

6,203, 

208, 

105, 
81, 

946, 
3,650, 

879, 
95, 

104 
27 
22 
47 

234 
35 
76 

158 
93 

160 

781 
7 

518 



756 .88 
493 .88 
794.86 
353 .94 
729 .57 
530 .79 
327.83 
,941.74 
,731.12 
,747.06 
,044.13 
,728.00 
,843.28 
,491.10 
,342.00 
,512.94 
,987.61 
,812.60 
,955.81 
,854.73 
, 132 .29 
,202.48 
,507.47 
,400.11 
,480.89 
,546.16 
,318.67 
,417.55 
,390.26 
,512.57 
,718.62 



28,479,327.52 

737,424.96 

261,106.86 

24,792.55 

165,562.50 



28, 814, 875. i 



424,305. 



200,260.30 

836,561.08 

34,372.89 

302,429.16 



Within the State 



1922 



$ 314, 

3, 

206, 

233, 

8, 

2, 

3, 

77, 

15, 

664, 

1,342, 

49, 

24, 

18, 

273, 

836, 

231, 

27, 

27, 

7, 

5, 

11, 

46 

8 

19 

40 

25 

42 

181 

1 

140 



245.11 
700.91 
444 .59 
563 .44 
224.85 
117.00 
742.11 
075.16 
296 .79 
276.27 
783 .41 
359 .34 
197.10 
920.62 
264.47 
, 794 .46 
,597.38 
,910.70 
,978.59 
, 732 .53 
,664.79 
,547.16 
,817.91 
,237.03 
,621.44 
, 646 .42 
,508.03 
,752.58 
,560.20 
,547.59 
,395.51 



1923 



369 
4 

240 

273 

8 

3 

4 

80 

16 

740 

,589 

53 

1 27 

20 

242 

035 

225 

24 

26 



136.32 
482.11 
784.84 
979.17 
898.06 
722.93 
695.77 
178.80 
,072.34 
,125.88 
,281.94 
,478.20 
,118.11 
,878.83 
,462.39 
,297.92 
,461.62 
,548.15 
,890.73 
,136.66 
,670.51 
,093.75 
,083.16 
,069.86 
,595.17 
,621.11 
,909.18 
,115.95 
.000.00 
,924.80 
.930.90 



,659,879.97 

182,973.59 

71,794.02 

7,710.69 

36,947.24 



6,741,822.99 



95,345.56 



42,256.70 

208,419.27 
8,738.90 
71,685.67 



7,296,688.50 

188,935.65 

66,898.19 

6,352.20 

42,418.77 



7,382,659.29 



108,711.43 



51,308.69 

214,335.31 

8,806.68 
77,485.38 



16 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING 


EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 






Amount of Operating Expenses for the Year 


Name of Railway Operating Expense 
Account 


Entire Line 


Within the State 




1922 


1923 


1922 


1923 


General— Con. 


I 1,107.07 
66,158.45 
61,825.47 
70,704.21 
44,963.64 
76,929.10 


% 1,055.86 
72,898.39 
66,868.25 
85,176.30 
49,249.20 
74,198.40 


% 286.86 
17,142.91 
16,020.15 
18,320.80 
11,650.93 
19,933.78 


$ 270 .52 




18,677.30 




17,132.31 




21,823.02 




12,618.14 




19,010.37 






Totals 


1,599,481.83 

50,941.38 

736.17 


1,723,069.83 

34,257.21 

1,118.56 


414,455.97 

13,199.87 

190.75 


441,467.72 
8,777.04 




286 .59 






Total general expenses 


1,649,687.04 


1,756,208.48 


427,465.09 


449,958.17 




10,720.00 


35,123.06 


2,777.76 


8,998.88 






Grand total railway operating expenses 


52,033,448.02 


59,868,428.39 


13,482,849.80 


15,338,890.03 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues 
74.02 per cent. 



): 1922, 73.47 per cent: 1923, 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE BAILROAD 



17 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 








1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat _ _ 


252 

1,938 

3,660 

1,301 

7,451 

8,922 

8,202 

12,615 

24,528 

15,802 

28,804 

21,297 

11,324 

23,597 

701 

5,097 


7,495 

48,193 

70,757 

22,721 

117,494 

152,746 

99,229 

123,415 

208,569 

305,724 

408,973 

273,947 

186,431 

273,716 

10,730 

77,944 


394 

2,394 

4,492 

1,439 

8,338 

10,561 

10,613 

17,303 

26,669 

14,602 

35,580 

14,165 

8,206 

26,052 

584 

4,517 


10,752 




52,551 


Oats . „„ 


85,802 




25,491 




125,196 




180,479 




128,840 




169,355 




211,836 




287,966 




506,752 


Other fresh fruits 


172,776 
135,556 




296,885 




9,740 




69,298 






Totals 


175,491 


2,381,084 


185,909 


2,469,275 






Animals and Products: 
Horses and mules _ 


1,885 

1,622 

77 

2,437 

1,334 

4,223 

70 

705 

319 

9 

225 

885 


19,553 
16,901 

758 

2!,3S8 

27,993 

64,451 

743 

7,646 

3,647 

113 

3,921 

15,612 


2,732 

2,134 

35 

2,024 

2,683 

3,705 

45 

690 

371 

21 

178 

1,045 


29,092 




22,082 




325 




20,098 




35,026 




54,340 


Poultry. ... . .. __.. 


480 


Eggs . . ... 


7,217 




3,956 


Wool 


349 


Hides and leather .... 


3,272 


Other animals and products ...._.. 


16,228 






Totals 


13,791 


175,736 


15,663 


192,465 






Products of Mines: 
Anthracite coal. __ ..... ._. 


92 

14,731 

616 

26 

43,549 

667 

1,595 

33,942 


4,031 

734,489 

18,080 

1,452 

1,825,702 

22,269 

29,474 

1,391,752 


254 

17,313 

1,704 

113 

71,936 

1,067 

1,443 

38,761 


11,222 




887,042 


Coke 


72,517 


Iron ore ... . _ 


4,338 


Clay, gravel, sand, and stone. 


3,047,292 


Asphaltum. . . ... 


36,202 


Salt 


28,320 


Other products of mines 


1,578,264 






Totals. _. 


95,218 


4,027,249 


132,591 


5,665,197 







Part II— 2 



18 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— Continued 



Commodity 



1922 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



1923 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood. 
Ties 



Pulp wood 

Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and headings 
Other products of forests 



Totals. 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, syrup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings... 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 

automobiles 

Automobiles and auto trucks 

Household goods and second-hand furniture 

Furniture (new) 

Beverages 

Ice 



Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives 

Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products). 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 



Totals- 



Grand totals, carload traffic. 
Merchandise — all L. C. L. freight.. 



Grand totals— carload and L. C. L. traffic 



72,301 

5,503 

109 

136,459 

382 



1,800,800 
146,387 

3,124 
3,263,984 

4,267 



75,410 

9,465 

130 

161,604 

12,659 



214,754 



5,224,562 



259,268 



24,099 

951 

2,891 

8,980 

512 

851 

3,677 

4,871 

5,979 

15,221 

3,368 

2,517 

595 
5,686 
2,404 

865 

349 

4,645 

50,366 

1,626 

467 
4,055 

731 
27,649 



651,302 
28,153 
45,564 

119,031 
21,760 
31,098 

102,993 
95,158 

210,472 

455,833 
68,935 
38,500 

8,399 
33,392 
20,298 

6,897 

6,679 

63,405 

1,074,088 

30,410 

9,899 

37,255 

14,990 

432,107 



26,783 

938 

3,084 



416 
1,139 
5,437 
6,382 
7,572 
14,969 
4,440 
2,406 



13,067 

2,317 

1,319 

363 

3,562 

58,182 

2,153 

1,166 

4,385 

730 

32,704 



173,355 



3,606,618 



194,494 



672, 



15,415,249 
1,022,709 



787,925 



16,437,958 



1,995,023 

250,829 

3,782 

3,884,881 
182,599 



i, 317, 114 



736,192 
29,079 
54,218 



15,875 
43, 182 
148,534 
127, 157 
271,822 
463,407 
95,511 
37,160 

12,050 

73,277 

18,883 

10,178 

6,144 

52,424 

1,261,370 

39,808 

27,876 

41,957 

14,591 

525,967 



4,106,662 



18,750,713 
1,124,268 



19,874, 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE KAILEOAD 



19 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— WITHIN THE STATE 





1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


138 

621 

1,133 

661 

2,386 

2,023 

4,853 

8,232 

16,283 

8,728 

10,591 

8,971 

7,452 

16,973 

241 

3,346 


4,780 

15,775 

22,152 

8,354 

40,553 

34,396 

58,236 

82,321 

113,963 

174,591 

148,279 

125,703 

123,949 

193,581 

3,721 

44,836 


167 
1,047 
1,878 
358 
2,534 
2,905 
6,541 

12,296 

18,568 
8,662 

16,475 
8,290 
3,176 

20,680 

184 

3,288 


5,840 




24,323 


Oats 


37,449 




5,106 




13,079 




43,124 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa. . 


78,496 


Tobacco 1_ 


122,958 


Cotton 1 


129,978 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 


172,355 


Citrus fruits... . . _ . 


230,648 


Other fresh fruits 


104,033 


Potatoes __ 


52,562 




257,573 




2,895 




36,073 






Totals 


92,632 


1,195,190 


107,049 


1,346,492 






Animals and Products: 
Horses and mules.. ... .__. 


762 

308 

17 

289 

249 

889 

5 

67 

87 

3 

170 

380 


8,010 

2,657 

163 

2,934 

3,571 

13,504 

64 

654 

1,082 

30 

2,731 

6,582 


1,116 

209 

9 

420 

580 

620 

62 

59 

124 

2 

162 

444 


11,214 




2,125 


Sheep and goats... . . 


76 


Hogs ._ ..... . . . . 


4,133 


Fresh meats... ... 


7,802 




9,995 


Poultry.. J. ... ... ... . 


760 


Eggs 


574 


Butter and cheese. . .... .. ... 


1,683 


Wool 


27 


Hides and leather. ... ._ 


2,577 




6,243 






Totals 


3,226 


41,982 


3,807 


47, 209 






Anthracite coal. 


70 

8,644 

216 

28 

12,070 

325 

675 

1,737 


2,923 

419,708 

6,021 

1,509 

494,519 

13,053 

13,406 

71,134 


175 

10,377 

510 


7,367 




529,060 


Coke . 


16,674 


Iron ore. ..... 




Clay, gravel, sand, and stone ... _. . 


18,075 
345 

686 
2,159 


741,082 


Asphaltum... 


11,210 


Salt 


14, 140 




84,851 






Totals 


23,765 


1,022,273 


32,327 


1,404,384 







20 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Commodity 



Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood. 
Ties 



Pulp wood 

Lumber, timber, box snooks, staves, and headings 
Other products of forests 



Totals. 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, syrup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 

automobiles 

Automobiles and auto trucks 

Household goods and second-hand furniture 

Furniture (new) 

Beverages . 

Ice 



Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives 

Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products). 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 



Totals- 



Grand totals, carload traffic- 
Merchandise— all L. C. L. freight. . 



Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic. 



1922 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



21,018 

518 

9 

81,736 
340 



103,621 



749 

678 

730 

398 

272 

1,753 

2,437 

2,485 

6,040 

1,940 



400 

2,792 
577 
759 
576 

1,263 

24,334 

982 

260 

3,235 
406 

6.954 



67,000 



290,244 



290,244 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



456,546 

13,972 

126 

1,961,678 

3,126 



2,435, 



153,242 
22,478 
12,208 
12,078 
14,337 
8.729 
49,099 
48,747 
90,294 

175,152 
33,616 
14,148 

4,804 
16,752 

4,773 

7,767 

10,378 

15,536 

511,005 

18,704 

6,041 
32,348 

8,364 
178,681 



1,449,281 



6,144,174 
429,700 



6,573, 



1923 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



20,949 

2,448 

40 

96,922 
1,318 



121,677 



,850 
770 
793 



246 
287 
2,304 
2,826 
3,346 
5,512 
2,449 
982 

588 

8,314 

787 

902 

240 

887 

27,792 

854 

549 

3,020 

397 



80,783 



345,643 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



454,115 

66, 130 

1,279 

2,326,139 

21,069 



2,868,732 



204,101 
23,356 
14,297 



8,847 

9,133 

64,509 

56,527 

127,106 

159,859 

35,154 

14,779 

7,059 

42,718 

6,282 

7,047 

3,115 

11,794 

583,630 

21,805 

12,890 

30, 202 

7,646 

214,624 



1,666, 



7,333.297 
470, 753 



7,804,050 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE EAILROAD 



21 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHII\ 


1 THE STATE 




Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 




1,013.49 


1,013.64 






Locomotive-miles : 
Freignt— 


1,679,204 

5,758 

37,218 


1,871,567 




8,487 


Light - - - 


41,657 








1,722,180 


1,921,711 






Passenger — 


1,959,467 

1,185 

35,477 


2,026,584 




992 


Light 


38,473 








1,996,129 


2,066,049 






Mixed train — 
Principal ._ ... ._ _. _._. ... .. 


29,209 

248 

2,763 


28,913 


Helper .. 


3,896 


Light 


4,398 








32,220 


37,207 






Special- 
Principal ... ._. . 


5,620 
84 
52 


5,807 


Helper . . . .. 




Light 


96 






Total special locomotive-miles 


5,756 


5,903 






Train switching .... 


190,038 


236,622 






Yard switching — 
Freight . 


585,855 
73,980 


648,165 


Passenger 


76,011 






Total yard switching locomotive-miles 


659,835 


724,176 








4,606,158 


4,991,668 






Work service. 


131,743 


173,513 






Freight Service: 
Tons— freight service... 


6,573,880 


7,804,050 






Ton-miles — revenue freight 


772,814,195 


927,416,215 






Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue.. 


2,394,346 
112,175,968 


2,394,485 


Passenger-miles — revenue 


125,994,477 







N. O. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 
1922 



Amount, 
1923 



Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue. 



$13,258,440.78 
3,878,287.02 
4,782,000.56 



$ 15,142,056.17 
4,332,890.92 
5,227,227.12 



Operating revenues. 
Operating expenses. 



18,351,668.93 
13,482,849.80 



20,722,894.80 
15,338,890.03 



Net operating revenues. 



4,868,819.13 



5,384,004.77 



Averages per Mile of Road: 
Locomotive-miles — transportation. 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 



4,545 
13,081.97 
4,718.35 
18,107.40 
13,303.39 
4,804.01 
762,528 



14,938.30 
5,156.88 
20,444.04 
15,132.48 
5,311.56 
914,936 



Operating ratio (per cent). 



74.02 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 



23 



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N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 









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ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 



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26 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TAXES 





Name of State 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 138,071.02 

471,433.51 

537,205.94 

418,192.74 

900,102.89 

189,104.80 

69.68 

27.40 

*101,549.80 

1878,263.46 


$ 146,760.10 




996,349.55 




690,730.27 




439,434.27 




1,124,207.28 




147,449.56 




\ 




> 83 .34 




171,344.21 


Florida .. . . .-. 






§100,000.00 










Totals 


3,634,021.24 


3,716,358.58 







UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TAXES 




Kind of Tax 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 280,169.19 

79,298.00 

238 .79 

t281,272.78 


$ 1,350,000.00 




103,143.00 




328 .38 








§214,335.44 










640,978.76 


1,708,641.42 








4,275,000.00 


5,425,000.00 







*Accrued, not paid, as matter is in dispute. fBack taxes. 
JAccrued 1922 taxes payable in 1923. §Back taxes unadjusted. 



ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD 



27 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 



Class of Employees 



1922 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



1923 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 

Executives, general officers, and assistants 

Division officers, assistants and staff assistants. 

Totals 



Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 
ants (A) 

Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 
ants (B) 

Subprofessional engineering and laboratory as- 
sistants 

Professional and subprofessional legal assistants. . 
Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments) ._ 
Chief clerks (minor departments) and assistant 

chief clerks and supervising cashiers 

Clerks and clerical specialists (A) 

Clerks (B) 

Clerks (C) 

Mechanical device operators (office) 

Stenographers and secretaries (A) 

Stenographers and typists (B) 

Storekeepers, sales agents, and buyers 

Ticket agents and assistant ticket agents 

Traveling auditors or accountants 

Telephone switchboard operators and office assist- 
ants 

Messengers and office boys 

Elevator operators and other office attendants 

Lieutenants and sergeants of police 

Patrolmen 

Watchmen (without police authority) 

Supervising traffic agents, 

Traffic agents, advertising and development agents 
Fire prevention, smoke, and time-service inspec- 
tors, and office building superintendents 

Claim agents and claim investigators 

Real estate and tax agents and investigators 

Examiners, instructors, and special investigators- 
Miscellaneous trades workers (other than plumbers) 

Motor vehicle and motor car operators... 

Teamsters and stablemen 

Janitors and cleaners 



Totals- 
Daily basis ... 
Hourly basis. 



133 



$ 492,071 
463,555 



225 



126 

133 

1,362 

292 
39 
46 

252 
34 
42 
18 

32 

108 

26 

217 

9 

8 

9 

84 

5 
55 

3 
10 

2 



955,626 



32,074 
35,554 

3,176' 

9,756 
163,435 

252,912 

245,596 
2,026,568 

354.939 
51,086 
79,471 

349,014 
70,648 
82,699 
45,591 

24,420 
83,762 
18,756 

416,725 
12,292 
48,955 
35,497 

220,976 

15,699 

107,063 

3,972 

23,397 

2,013 



847 

43,516 



741 
2,375 



1,449,589 
3,410,820 



91 

140 



$ 573,447 
512,399 



231 



30 

17 

4 
69 

124 

135 
1,402 

378 
55 
49 

261 
37 
46 
18 

31 
114 

26 

134 

2 

44 

11 



700 
2,526 



1,085,846 



39,050 

63,574 

27,666 

10,980 

175,294 

260,118 

246,923 

,033,636 

508,315 

67,299 

90,208 

377,986 

78,105 

92,912 

48,413 

19,392 
80,854 
18,051 

244,396 

3,305 

44,504 

43,284 

248,270 

10,947 

114,262 

5,046 

25,869 

1,920 

138 

711 

42,747 



1,398,023 
3,626,152 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION— Continued 



Class of Employees 



1922 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



1923 



Average 

Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Roadmasters and general foremen 

Assist ant general foremen 

Supervising maintenance of way inspectors and 

scale inspectors 

Maintenance of way inspectors 

Bridge and building gang foremen 

Bridge and building carpenters 

Bridge and building ironworkers 

Bridge and building painters 

Masons, bricklayers, plasterers, and plumbers 

Skilled trades helpers^ 

Regular apprentices 

Portable steam equipment operators 

Portable steam equipment operator helpers 

Pumping equipment operators 

Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers) 
Gang foremen (bridge and building, signal and 

telegraph laborers) 

Gang or section foremen 

Laborers (extra gang and work-train)... 

Track and roadway section laborers 

Maintenance of way laborers (other than track 

and roadway) and gardeners and farmers 

General foremen and supervising inspectors (sig- 
nal, telegraph, and electrical transmission) 

Assistant general foremen (signal, telegraph, and 
electrical transmission) and signal and telegraph 

inspectors , 

Gang foremen (signal and telegraph skilled trades 

labor) 

Signalmen and signal maintainers 

Linemen and groundmen 

Assistant signalmen and assistant signal main- 
tainers 

Signalman and signal maintainer helpers 



Totals- 
Daily basis... 
Hourly basis. 



47 
2 

5 

2 
41 

10! I 
13 
11 



72 
42 
18 
11 
147 
50 

32 

588 

918 

2,647 

535 

6 



57 
5,331 



$ 139,667 
3,500 

8,715 

2,737 

71,235 

154,328 

24,275' 

13,090 

31 

82,571 

29,325 

32,052 

9,295 

103,244 

80,555 

53,485 

820,398 

419,890 

1,289,186 

284,473 

17,686 

5,332 

7,793 
77,074 
16,992 

6,382 
36,203 



166,085 
3,623,329 



5 

4 
47 
121 

22 
14 
4 

102 



$ t49,540 
3,720 

8,776 

7,790 

84,294 

167,336 

30,800 

18,646 

3,344 

107,888 



24 
11 
149 
61 

29 

614 

945 

3,135 

524 



57 
5,931 



40,579 

10,792 

101,860 

105,255 

51,193 

889,494 

476,922 

1,534,758 

282,641 

18,720 

5,640 

13,770 
34,007 
29,166 

5,530 
52,682 



177,620 
4,117,523 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



29 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 


George R. Loyall 

Ernest Williams 

E. D. Kyle 

M. S. Hawkins 

J. F. George 

W. B. Rodman 

J. C. Nelms, Jr. 


Norfolk, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 




Norfolk, Va. 




Norfolk, Va. 






General Manager 

Chief Engineer 

Mechanical Superintendent 


F. P. Pelter 

F. L. Nicholson 

A. C. Adams 


Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 



DIRECTORS 

Philip Allen, Providence, R. I. ; Frederic Bull, New York, N. Y. ; Lewis L. Clarke, New 
York, N. Y. ; C. M. Carr, Durham, N. C. ; C. E. Foy, New Bern, N. C. ; E. C. Granbury, 
New York, N. Y. ; T. T. Harkrader, New York, N. Y. ; George W. Hill, New York, N. Y. ; 
Alvin W. Kuch, New York, N. Y. ; Luke v. Lockwood, New York, N. Y. ; George A. Loyall, 
Norfolk, Va. ; S. M. Nicholson, Providence, R. I. ; Marsden J. Perry, New York, N. Y. ; 
R. H. Swartwout, New York, N. Y. ; John T. Terry, New York, N. Y. ; Ernest Williams, 
Lynchburg, Va. 

HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report: Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

2. Date of organization: April 30, 1910. (Charter filed May 2, 1910.) 

3. Under laws of what government, state or territory organized ? If more than one, name 
all. Give specific reference to each statute and all amendments thereof : 

Virginia, pursuant to provisions of an act of the General Assembly of Virginia entitled 
"An Act Concerning Corporations," which became a law the 21st day of May, 1903, and 
amendments thereto. 

4. If a consolidated or merging company, name all constituent and all merged companies. 
Give specific reference to charters or general laws governing organization of each, and all 
amendments of same: 

NORFOLK AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Organized June 1, 1891, under North Carolina General Law ; certificates filed May, 1891. 
Norfolk and Southern Railroad Company, Albemarle and Pantego Railroad Company, and 
Elizabeth City and Norfolk Railroad Company. Charter granted by State of North Carolina 
January 20, 1870, amended January 24, 1874, March 7, 1878, January 20, 1883, January 31, 
1883. Ratified by State of Virginia, February 23, 1875, March 3, 1882, March 6, 1882, 
February 3, 1888. Amended in State of North Carolina March 2, 1889, March 11, 1889, 
March 10, 1891. Albemarle and Pantego Railroad Company charter granted by North 
Carolina March 2, 1891. Authorized by resolutions of respective boards of directors June 1, 
1891, and authorized by General Law of North Carolina, being noncompetitive roads. 



MERGER OF NORFOLK AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD COMPANY AND ALBEMARLE 
AND PANTEGO RAILROAD COMPANY 

Norfolk and Southern Railroad Company foreclosed by sale April 1, 1891. Organized 
January 20, 1870, as the Elizabeth City and Norfolk Railroad Company. Name changed by 
legislative enactment January 31, 1883, to Norfolk Southern Railroad Company. 

The Norfolk, Virginia Beach and Southern Railroad was purchased by this company on 
November 1, 1899, and merged into it. The Washington and Plymouth Railroad was pur- 
chased by this company on January 15, 1904, operated until March 31, 1904, as an inde- 
pendent line, and merged into this company on April 1, 1904. On December 12, 1904, Chesa- 
peake Transit Company, an electric line operated between Norfolk and Virginia Beach 
(23.55 miles), was acquired and merged with this company. 



30 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

VIRGINIA AND CAROLINA COAST RAILROAD COMPANY 

Organized June 30, 1905, under an act of the General Assembly, State of Virginia, entitled 
"An Act Governing Corporations," which became a law on the 21st day of May, 1903. 

Suffolk and Carolina Railway Company organized under the laws of the States of Virginia 
and North Carolina, February 26, 1874, by virtue of authority of act of the General 
Assembly, State of Virginia, session 1872-1874, chapter 185, approved March 19, 1873, incor- 
porating Nansemond Land, Lumber and Narrow Gauge Railway Company ; session 1883- 
1884, page 236, chapter 192, approved February 26, 1884, amended and reenacted the above 
act, changing the corporate name to the Suffolk and Carolina Railway Company ; session 
1885-1886, page 109, chapter 114, approved February 12, 1886, amended and reenacted the 
charter of the Suffolk and Carolina Railway Company. 

Incorporated under the laws of the State of North Carolina, September 24, 1884 ; session 
1887, chapter 94, page 181, confirms and continues the charter and franchises and corporate 
privileges, and grants additional powers, etc. ; session 1889, chapter 272, page 277, grants 
additional powers, etc. 

Carolina Coast Railroad Company, incorporated under authority chapter 49 of Code of 
North Carolina and ratified by the General Assembly of State of North Carolina March 5, 
1903. Merged January 27, 1906, under authority conferred by an act of General Assembly 
of the State of Virginia, which became a law on the 21st day of May, 1903, under which 
law this company was organized and an agreement of merger between the stockholders of 
the Virginia and Carolina Coast Railroad Company and Suffolk and Carolina Railway Com- 
pany and Carolina Coast Railroad Company, dated January 10, 1906, and in conformity to 
an instrument dated January 27, 1906, authorizing said merger by the State of Virginia. 

ATLANTIC AND NORTH CAROLINA COMPANY 

Organized May 19, 1903, as Howland Improvement Company, chartered by Private Laws 
of North Carolina, 1903, chapter 271. Amended Laws 1905, Private, chapter 86, ratified 
February 15, 1905. 

All amendments thereof, North Carolina. 

PAMLICO, ORIENTAL AND WESTERN RAILROAD COMPANY 

Organized March 9, 1891, under Laws of the State of North Carolina, chapter 461, Laws 
of 1891. Amended January 27, 1902. 

November 28, 1906, the Norfolk and Southern Railroad, the Virginia and Carolina Coast 
Railroad, the Raleigh and Pamlico Sound Railroad, and the Atlantic and North Carolina 
Railroad Company consolidated into one corporation, entitled the Norfolk and Southern 
Railway Company, as per agreement of consolidation dated October 29, 1906, filed in the 
office of the Secretary of State of North Carolina and in the office of the Corporation 
Commission of Virginia. 

RALEIGH, CHARLOTTE AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

Organized October 3, 1911 (charter ratified by General Assembly of North Carolina, 
March 7, 1911), under an act of the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina entitled 
"An Act to Incorporate the Raleigh, Charlotte and Southern Railway Company." 

This company consolidated with the Raleigh and Southport Railway Company, Durham 
and Charlotte Railroad Company, Sanford and Troy Railroad, and Aberdeen and Asheboro 
Railroad Company. The Raleigh and Southport Railway Company received its charter under 
chapter 304 of the Private Laws of North Carolina of the year 1905. The Durham and 
Charlotte Railroad Company received its charter under chapter 158 of the Private Laws 
of North Carolina of the session of 1893. The Sanford and Troy Railroad received its 
charter under the General Laws of the State of North Carolina of 1909. The Aberdeen 
and Asheboro Railroad Company received its charter under chapter 415 of the Private Laws 
of the State of North Carolina, session 1907, under an act to consolidate the Aberdeen and 
West End Railroad Company, the Aberdeen and Montgomery Railroad Company, and the 
Jackson Springs Railroad Company. This charter was amended by chapter 148 of th< 
session of 1909 under an act to amend charter of the Aberdeen and Asheboro Railroad. 

All the above consolidations were made by agreement dated February 1, 1912, by authorit 
of the stockholders. 

The Raleigh, Charlotte and Southern Railway Company were merged with the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad Company, January 1, 1914. 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



31 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$31,790,861.02 
144,780.44 
267,320.75 


Investments: 


$31,947,442.07 

141,671.41 

250,644.71 

88,970.32 

246,531.89 

178,865.74 

2,534,400.00 

42,500.00 

52,638.49 

252,980.50 
20,000.00 


$ 33,045,856.21 


Improvements on leased railway property 


182,729.93 
250,847.03 


104,973.49 
253,961.18 

180,909.39 


Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 


69,063.84 
220,988.59 


Investments in affiliated companies — 


178,865.74 


2,700,800.00 
81,750.00 




2,296,800.00 


Notes. .- . 


406,453.53 


4,110.14 




108,019.65 


253,211.62 


Other investments — 


252,979.50 


20,000.00 




20,000.00 


80,000.00 














35,882,678.03 


35,756,645.13 


37,032,604.02 




Curkent Assets: 
Cash . 




814,577.42 


633,476.79 

140,570.00 

477,810.63 

24,173.13 

96,906.41 

199,285.53 

501,453.59 

25,983.28 


720,015.06 


54,750.00 




159,575.00 


487,189.51 




78,857.65 


41,538.00 
109,487.35 
220,509.22 


Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 


13,723.25 
88,237.07 
161,101.05 


453,717.73 
16,509.34 


Material and supplies 


542,713.58 
10,759.77 








2,198,278.57 


2,099,659.36 


1,774,982.43 




Deferred Assets: 
Working fund advances . 




57,370.51 


53,482.90 


53,345.40 


1,628,712.16 






15,948.93 




17,383.94 


105,294.78 








1,702,031.60 


70,866.84 


158,640.18 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance.. 




4,251.52 
916,140.93 


19,734.33 
776,014.94 
688,703.09 


18,613.24 
734,957.36 


303,811.13 




383,865.11 








1,224,203.58 


1,484,452.36 


1,137,435.71 




Grand totals.. 




41,007,191.78 


39,411,623.69 


40,103,662.34 















N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$16,000,000.00 


Stock: 


$16,000,000.00 


$ 16,000,000.00 




Long-term Debt: 




17,202,600.00 


17,029,300.00 


17,159,418.62 




Current Liabilities: 




278,513.27 


221,199.36 

274,351.26 

729,779.40 

3,669.94 

61,145.00 

10.00 

287,855.97 

7,000.00 


88,400.79 


267,946.86 


Traffic and car-service balances payable, . 


306,666.05 


786,711.52 




742,424.87 


27,362.32 




19,177.72 


54,825.00 




80,150.00 


10.00 




10.00 


318,424.60 




287,592.10 


8.312.47 


Unmatured rents accrued- .. 


7,000.00 








1,742,106.04 


1,585,010.93 


1,531,421.53 




Deferred Liabilities: 




2,236,024.80 


53,810.93 
14,508.06 


11,646.19 


22,102.63 




40,527.63 








2,258,127.43 


68,318.99 


52,173.82 




Unadjusted Credits: 




63,881.37 


169,455.74 

23,121.25 

10,755.99 

920,768.71 

193,255.96 


4,673.62 






61,868.34 


10,755.99 




10,755.99 


840,409.98 




1,035,043.74 


137,619.28 




244,775.15 








1,052,666.62 


1,317,357.65 


1,357,116.84 




Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and sur- 
plus 




17,792.08 


59,878.20 
1,450.00 


71,879.37 
1,915.54 




Total appropriated surplus.- 




17,792.08 
2,733,899.61 


61,328.20 
3,350,307.92 


73,794.91 
3,929,736.62 




Total corporate surplus 




2,751,691.69 


3,411,636.12 


4,003,531.53 


41 007 191 78 


39,411,623 .69 


40,103,662.34 











NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



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Part II— 3 



34 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



MILES OF ROAD AT CLOSE OF YEAR— BY STATES 





Road Operated 


State 


Line 
Owned — 
Main Line 


Line 

Operated 

Under 

Lease 


Line 
Operated 

Under 
Trackage 

Rights 


Total 
Mileage 
Operated 


1922— 


110.279 
680.314 




2.750 
3.520 


113 029 


Nortn Carolina ... . 


133 .293 


817.127 






Totals... 


790 .593 


133 .293 


6.270 


930.156 






1923— 


110.279 

679 .984 




2.750 
4.975 


113.029 


North Carolina 


133.895 


818.854 






Totals 


790.263 


133.895 


7.725 


931 .883 







RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Mail 

Express 

Other passenger-train 

Milk 

Switching 

Special service train. 

Water transfers — freight 

Water transfers— other.. ._ 

Total rail-line transportation revenue 

Station, train, and boat privileges — 

Parcel room 

Storage — freight 

Storage — baggage 

Demurrage. 

Telegraph and telephone.. i.__ 

Power 

Rents of buildings and other property 

Miscellaneous 

Total incidental operating revenues... 

Joint facility — Cr 

Joint facility— Dr 

Total joint facility operating revenue. 

Total railway operating revenues 



,469,656.86 

,476,853.20 

10,711.13 

103,261.93 

186,596.74 

8,033.79 

1,113.80 

56,407.07 

9,324.13 

145.05 

54.00 



$ 7 
1 



8,322,157.70 



5,536.23 

81.30 

1,460.96 

163 .71 

25,425.93 

5,366.98 

22,995.86 

16,541.83 

9,160.76 



83,811.64 



7,082.15 
94.17 



6,987.98 



8,412,957.32 



354,158.74 
479,624.82 

13,850.37 
109,910.35 
192,820.09 

7,820.73 

4,618.95 
55,153.87 

7,593.21 
25.00 

3,410.00 



9,228, 



.13 



6,580.93 

121 .60 

16,977.86 

255 .06 

55,480.03 

5,176.73 

30,715.66 

14,741.53 

20,787.28 



150,764.68 



7,022.39 
119.93 



6,902.44' 



,386,653.25 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



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N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence, 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other 

Ties — yard 

Ties— other 

Rails— yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material — yard 

Other track material — other 

Ballast 

Track laying and surfacing — yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences — other 

Crossings and signs — yard 

Crossings and signs — other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

St or age wareh ouses 

Wharves and docks 

Telegraph and telephone lines .. 

Signals and inter lockers. 

Power plant buildings 

Power substation buildings 

Power transmission systems ^ 

Power distribution systems 

Power line poles and fixtures 

Miscellaneous structures 

Paving 

Roadway machi nes 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements... 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Totals... 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr. 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Cr.. 



67,621.41 

1,960.64 

72,948.92 



196,561.95 

13,277.97 

311,175.61 

1,519.90 

3,773.88 

2,904.35 

24,839.17 

3,149.13 

11,526.27 

291,424.19 

362 .03 

196.33 

13,043.65 

36,631.09 

3,948.60 

16,292.54 

6,626.32 

6,974.56 

4.34 

3,856.19 

21,569.63 

1,545.13 

213 .84 

121 .00 

390 .33 

9,085.48 

2,980.55 



453 .94 

9,054.76 

14,677.57 

2,366.20 

64.46 

4,274.38 

6,345.90 

1,509.98 

859 .05 



1,166,131.24 

21,679.15 

5,158.46 



Total maintenance of way and structures. 



1,182,651.93 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



37 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance op Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Power plant machinery 

Power substation apparatus 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation 

Otner locomotives — repairs 

Other locomotives — depreciation 

Freight-train cars — repairs 

Freight-train cars — depreciation 

Freight-train cars — retirements 

Passenger-train cars — repairs ._ _ _ 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation 

Passenger- train cars — retirements 

Motor equipment of cars — repairs 

Motor equipment of cars — depreciation- 
Floating equipment — repairs. 

Floating e quip ment — depreciation 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment — depreciation 

Miscellaneous equipment — repairs 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation. 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance _ 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Totals.. 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Dr. 

Total maintenance of equipment 



Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing. 

Total traffic... 



78,377 

15,387 

9,725 

1,291 

457,395 

29,366 

4,379 

437 

377,865 

57, 100 

5,523 

116,931 

9,478 

1,988 

6,749 

1,444 

26,866 

4,318 

14,188 

3,952 

189 

114 

3,298 

26,756 

1,320 

40,762 



1,295,211.88 
1,389.76 



1,296,601.64 



135,875.01 
3,632.85 
4,809.08 



28,797.70 



76,926.96 

28,336.88 

9,017.90 

1,383.36 

535,130.53 

33,901.68 

3,946.32 

1,155.00 

533,962.50 

64,455.94 

5,221.68 

121,211.80 

9,992.77 



6,066.63 

1,904.52 

2,242.56 

7,129.28 

17,963.14 

4,292.79 

374.00 

275.14 

4,741.86 

32,935.10 

1,494.94 

420 .54 



1,499,998.70 
1,128.81 



1,501,127.51 



94,376.38 

153,498.47 

4,264.89 

4,887.07 

4.00 

28,608.59 



262,023.52 



285,639.40 



38 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



Transportation — Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus. 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Yard motormen. __ 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — yard.. 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Train power produced 

Train power purchased 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Engineh ouse expenses — train 

Trainmen _ _ 

Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation _ 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operation... 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing... 

Other expenses.. 

I nsur ance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to livestock on right of way 

Loss and damage — freight 

Loss and damage — baggage... 

Injuries to persons 



Totals 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr.. 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr... 



Total transportation— rail line. 



$ 126,757.31 


S 128,916.77 


39,902.20 


40,897.66 


607,214.94 


653,826.37 


7,730.45 


7,626.63 


23,954.52 


26,609.51 


27,159.39 


25,626.22 


121,373.63 


136,305.81 


658 .43 


769 .31 


86,019.88 


93,876.70 


2,480.18 


365.71 


88,452.56 


110,044.74 


1,914.94 


1,519.98 


749 .03 


1,220.32 


605 .23 


579 .78 


19,551.65 


20,432.39 


875 .89 


915.22 


372,443.29 


400,584.48 


30,756.14 


30,200.86 


712,082.13 


736,964.96 


75,104.49 


66,581.01 


3,607.20 


7,088.54 


32,890.33 


29 i 329 .26 


11,316.44 


12,251.43 


5,552.83 


8,806.93 


81,698.10 


104,266.43 


507,267.26 


543,387.22 


75,843.98 


77,494.46 


16,614.25 


18,825.65 


17,995.42 


16,992.18 


17,537.32 


16,104.79 


105 .00 
32,341.27 




34,292.54 


35,609.65 


37,804.88 


1,074.66 


1,674.30 


5,568.76 


7,569.52 


28,218.31 


40,801.67 


27,715.36 


18,404.36 


6,028.30 


3,551.26 


84,198.10 


92,167.35 


265 .83 


378.13 


70,728.72 


124,867.63 


3,407,753.37 


3,679,862.96 


102,988.72 


74,832.24 


8,705.21 


11,179.80 


12,273.58 


10,703.96 


7,351.31 


5, 139 .92 


3,506,959.15 


3,749,079.44 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



39 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 




Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Miscellaneous Operations: 
Producing power sold 


$ 6,144.53 


% 7,765.17 


General: 
Salaries and expenses of general officers 


62,655.24 

184,542.27 

13,179.06 

47,073.47 

655 .03 

367.50 

15,379.77 

7,717.46 

15,195.75 


59,470.28 
185,968.57 




12,467.80 




67,256.60 




483 .94 


Pensions.. 




Stationery and printing... . . . _ 


16,951.62 


Valuation expenses ... . 


6,279.01 


Other expenses ... ...... ........ 


13,801.36 






Totals 


346,765.55 
2,583.28 


362,913.67 




3,234.49 








349,348.83 


365,913.67 






Transportation for investment — Cr 


8,294.26 


15.75 






Grand total railway operating expenses ._ 


6,595,435.34 


7,125,644.80 







Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 78.40 per cent for 1922; 75.91 
per cent for 1923. 



40 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other... 

Ties — yard 

Ties — other 

Rails — yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material — yard 

Other track material— other 

Ballast 

Track laying and surfacing— yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences 

Crossings and signs — yard 

Crossings and signs — other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Storage warehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Power transmission systems 

Miscellaneous structures — depreciation. . 

Paving 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements... 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr. 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Cr. 

Total maintenance of way and structures 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation.. 

Other locomotives — repairs 

Freigh t-tr ai n cars — repairs 

Freight-train cars— depreciation 

Freight-train cars — retirements 

Passenger-train cars — repairs 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation. 
Passenger-train cars — retirements.. 



53,894.30 

1,873.88 

60,588.90 

166,198.48 

6,859.77 

262,150.98 

1,351.13 

3,474.35 

2,439.51 

20,359.68 

2,700.96 

8,817.35 

239,558.81 

303 .25 

143.12 

10,591.33 

29,802.20 

3,348.65 

13,618.11 

5,680.15 

5,930.68 

3.72 

3,307.40 

18,214.15 

1,323.62 



389.34 

7,694.76 

11,820.00 

1,765.62 

37.82 

3,924.47 

5,442.79 

1,296.00 

735 .77 



955,671.05 
16,919.33 

4,376.12 



968,214.26 



61,523.22 

13,038.87 

392,290.24 

25,186.85 

.99 

324,014.71 

48,926.58 

4,737.69 

80,907.96 

6,228.28 

1,705.64 



55,356.09 

1,463.15 

44,260.38 

171,791.30 

29,281.05 

307,175.11 

3,533.27 

14,133.12 

6,513.27 

17, 609 .94 

5,879.04 

6,855.78 

242,445.57 

117.02 

141.05 

11,613.21 

35,193.14 

3,614.53 

16,122.60 

5,582.89 

10,109.29 



7,518.27 
29,442.13 

4,800.67 
57.19 
83.25 



11,023.22 

15,100.19 

243 .56 



4,321.76 

7,180.26 

1,357.66 

31.92 



1,069,910.89 
10,959.13 
3,999.12 



1,076,910.89 



65,516.85 

25,762.19 

497,189.78 

31,498.05 



496,059.45 

59,886.01 

4,851.46 

98,343.63 

6,902.03 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



41 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Maintenance of Equipment— Con. 
Motor equipment of cars — depreciation. 

Floating equipment— repairs 

Floating equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment — depreciation 

Miscellaneous equipment — repairs 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation. 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance... 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Dr. 



Total maintenance of equipment. 

Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 



Total traffic. 



Transportation— Rail Line — 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus. 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Yard motormen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Train power purchased 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — train 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



176.87 
043 .32 
703 .69 
991 .04 
377 .08 
162.71 
98.33 
817.88 
948.56 
132.47 
,961.00 



1,062,993.98 
1,230.55 



1,064,204.53 



72,800.11 

111,358.94 

1,879.58 

3,943.56 



23,508.78 



213,490.97 



388 .05 
121.48 
954.75 
382.20 
346.81 
294 .23 
229 .50 
532 .48 
858.97 
417.49 
864.52 
642 .42 
642 .43 
519.10 
769.18 
751 .24 
431 .48 
1.22 
733.61 



28, 
9, 
4, 

70, 
397, 

59 , 

13, 



209 .57 
688 .30 
762 .58 
071 .32 
584.12 
414.67 
361.81 



1923 



2,083.56 

6,623.81 

16,235.37 

3,945.73 

347 .48 

255 .63 

4,232.72 

30,600.00 

1,384.80 

390 .72 



1,347,942.15 
1,048.80 



1,348,990 95 



83,735.80 

136,250.86 

1,938.12 

4,343.19 

3.72 

25,408.59 



251,680.28 



111,009.33 

29,929.41 

588,537.93 

6,832.33 

23,067.62 

23,809.32 

123,735.99 

694 .82 

86,374.96 



102,242.57 

1,412.21 

1,133.80 

538.67 

18,983.73 

850 .33 

372,183.04 



684,714.14 

257.70 

27,242.59 

11,331.13 

8,163.94 

96,873.94 

465,563.29 

67,570.17 

16,451.66 



42 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Transportation— Rail Line— Con. 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to livestock on right of way 

Loss and damage — freight 

Loss and damage— baggage 

Injuries to persons 

Totals 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr 

Total transportation— rail line 

General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of clerks and attendants 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Insurance 

Pensions 

Stationery and printing... 

Valuation expenses 

Other expenses 

Totals 

General joint facilities — Dr 

Total general expenses 

Transportation for investment — Cr 

Grand total railway operating expenses 



$ 13,447.99 


$ 13,699.10 


13,822.48 


13,777.75 


90.06 




27,738.65 


31,861.20 


28,174.56 


32,492.49 


921.72 


1,555.59 


4,737.82 


6,993.82 


23,944.41 


37,545.70 


23,488.91 


16,639.45 


4,952.50 


3,097.31 


171,238.52 


85,054.75 


181.68 


295 .57 


59,848.84 


114,416.04 


2,739,381.55 


3,226,933.39 


72,632.34 


54,968.61 


7,466.34 


10,336.00 


10,526.88 


9,945.05 


4,328.39 


3,796.59 


2,810,746.04 


3,277,714.46 


51,244.05 


52,714.64 


148,332.05 


162,199.13 


10,799.52 


10,921.95 


39,163.10 


61,032.06 


543 .64 


448 .56 


315 .20 




12,656.28 


15,111.51 


6,613.19 


5,809.63 


12,552.66 


12,418.06 


282,219.69 


320,655.54 


1,032.47 


1,455.36 


283,252.16 


322,110.90 


7,113.87 


14.63 


5,332,794.09 


6,277,392.85 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating 
per cent for 1923. 



to 



operating revenues), 78.39 per cent for 1922; 75.79 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



43 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-ENTIRE LINE 



Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 




930.15 


931.45 






Train-miles: 


857,711 

1,149,949 

297,523 

3,738 


896,376 




1,156,318 




336,230 




5,069 








2,308,921 


2,393,993 








61,144 


64,496 






Locomotive-miles : 

Freight — 


896,525 
13,291 


923,831 




10,651 








909,816 


934,482 






Passenger — 


808,967 
1,606 


819,266 




2,949 








810,573 


822,215 








300,507 
7,894 


336,422 




6,619 








308,401 


343,041 






Special — 


3,389 
85 


4,390 


Light 


45 








3,474 


4,435 








56,280 


71,415 








289,872 


326,966 








2,378,416 


2,502,554 








61,144 


64,496 






Car-miles: 
Freight train — 


17,249,667 
4,184,654 


20,716,111 




4,624,375 








21,434,321 
835,418 


25,340,486 




875,782 






Total freight train car-miles _. ______ ___„„! 


22,269,739 


26,216,263 







44 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE-Continued 




Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 


Car-miles— Con. 
Passenger train — 


2,339,169 

433,049 

1,233,741 


2,312,896 


Sleeping, parlor, and observation... . 

Other. . 


452,897 
1,250,845 








4.005,959 


4,016,638 






Mixed train — 


2,094,423 

610,024 

318,886 

14,398 

225,758 


2,152,695 




671,693 




366,648 




16,919 




231,507 








3,263,489 








Special train — 


13,801 
22,325 






40,303 








36,126 


58,071 






Total transportation service car-miles . 


29,575,313 


33,730,439 








241,949 


422,537 






Freight Service: 
Tons— 


3,037,911 
244,827 


3,633,423 




256,380 








3,282,738 


3,889,803 






Ton-miles — 


327,670,697 
22,050,883 


413,037,669 




24,818,365 








349,721,582 


437,856,034 






Passenger Service: 


2,043,961 
46,826,398 


1,947,473 




47,637,852 






Revenues and Expenses: 


$ 6,469,656.86 
1,476,853.20 
1,786,570.59 


% 7,354,158.74 




1,479,624.82 




1,808,645.31 








8,412,957.32 
6,595,435.34 


9,386,653.25 




7, 125, 644 .80 








1,817,521.98 


2,261,008.45 







NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



45 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles. 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation. 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger-miles— revenue 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles— mixed trains.. .... 

Empty freight car-miles— freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles— mixed trains 

Ton-miles— revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight... 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains. 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles— freight trains. 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains.. 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains. _ 

Car-miles — special trains 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

T on-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 



Averages per Car-mile— Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 



Amount, 
1922 



922 

1,236 

320 

4 

2,482 

66 

2,557 

26,864 

4,932 

6,955.50 

1,920.73 

9,044.73 

7,090.72 

1,954.01 

352,277 

375,984 

50,343 



20.11 

7.04 

4.88 

2.05 

296.73 

316.70 

8.48 

1.88 

38.99 

5.86 

1.49 

3.64 

2.85 

.79 



Amount, 
1923 



962 

1,242 

361 

5 

2,570 

69 

2,687 

31,197 

5,016 

7,895.39 

1,941,75 

10,077.46 

7,650.05 

2,427.41 

443,435 

470,080 

51,144 



23.11 

6.40 

5.16 

2.00 

352 .295 

373 .463 

3.47 

1.83 

39.16 

6.27 

1.49 

3.92 

2.98 

.94 



28.05 

1.00 

4.12 

.98 

10.03 

.80 

12.18 



18.06 

19.15 

0.32158 



15.13 

0.46982 



46 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 


Miscellaneous Averages: 




113.68 






96.80 






112.57 






24.46 






$ .202403 






.01781 






.75977 






.03106 






75.91 









STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE 




Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 




817.12 


•818.42 






Train-miles: 


792,594 

751,469 

272,581 

2,759 


825,645 




763,450 




307,017 




2,913 








1,819,403 


1,899,025 








60,967 


64,370 






Locomotive-miles : 
Freight — 


831,408 
5,645 


853,100 


Light - 


10,210 








837,053 


863,310 






Passenger — 


752,981 
1,482 


763,167 


Light 


2,697 








754,463 


765,864 






Mixed train — 


275,565 
6,810 


307,209 


Light . - 


6,556 








282,375 


313,765 







NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



47 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHiN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 


Locomotive-miles— Con . 
Special — 


2,759 
85 


3,768 


Light - 


45 








2,844 


3,813 








50,646 


65,278 








202,828 


253,866 








2,130,209 


2,265,896 








60,967 


64,370 






Car-miles: 
Freight train — 


15,274,568 
3,545,818 


18,818,662 


Empty 


4,131,680 






Sum of loaded and empty 


18,820,386 
770,301 


22,950,342 




805,051 








19,590,687 


23,755,393 






Passenger train — 
Passenger 


1,561,735 

389,148 

1,160,523 


1,550,547 




406,087 


Other 


1,174,063 






Total passenger train car-miles 


3,111,406 


3,130,697 






Mixed train — 
Freight — loaded 


1,921,729 

532,014 

293,132 

14,398 

212,048 


2,022,002 


Freight — empty . ... 


630,216 




333,777 


Sleeping, parlor, and observation 


16,919 


Other passenger-train 


231,507 






Total mixed train car-miles 


2,973,321 


3,234,421 






Special train — 
Freight— loaded 


13,801 
17,593 


17,768 


Passenger ... . 


31,498 






Total special train car-miles. 


31,394 


49,266 






Total transportation service car- miles 


25,706,808 


30,169,777 






Work service 


241,276 


421,781 







48 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE STATE-Continued 



Item 



Amount, 
1922 



Amount, 
1923 



Freight Service: 
Tons- 
Revenue freight... 

Nonrevenue freight 

Total tons, freight service 

Ton-miles— 

Revenue freight 

Nonrevenue freight 

Total ton-miles, freight service 

Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried— revenue 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles. 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles- 

Transportation service train-miles. 

Work-train miles -_ 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses. . _ 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — revenue freight. . '. 

Ton-miles — all f reigh t 

Passenger-miles — revenue... 



2,498,562 


3,054,036 


209,318 


223,986 


2,707,880 


3,278,022 


297,477,095 


380,757,654 


21,705,169 


22,979,274 


319,182,264 


403,736,928 


1,622,496 


979,626 


37,170,838 


35,597,423 


% 5,276,496.64 


% 6,661,864.40 


1,172,308.89 


1,197,143.21 


1,451,714.74 


1,496,248.67 


6,802,901.00 


8,282,613.60 


5,832,794.09 


6,277,392.85 


970,106.91 


2,005,220.75 


970 


1,009 


920 


932 


334 


375 


3 


4 


2,227 


2,320 


75 


78 


2,608 


2,769 


26,995 


32,288 


4,465 


4,575 


% 6,457.43 


$ 8,139.91 


1,776.62 


1,828.22 


8,325.46 


10,120.25 


7,138.23 


7,670.14 


1,187.23 


2,450.11 


364,056 


465,235 


390,619 


493,313 


45,490 


43,495 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



49 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 


Averages per Train-mile: 


19.27 

7.05 

4.47 

1.95 

292.34 

313.68 

4.14 

1.91 

46.52 

1 5.18 

1.82 

3.74 

3.21 

.53 


22.79 




6.59 




5.00 




2.C5 




353 .404 




374 .733 


Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains . ... .. 


4.10 
1.90 




43.48 




$ 6.18 


Passenger service train revenue... - . . ... .. 


1.83 




4.36 




3.30 




1.06 






Averages per Locomotive-mile: 
Train-miles — freight trains 


.95 
23.41 

1.00 

4.12 

.95 

10.53 

.97 
11.04 


.96 


Car-miles — freight trains 


27.52 


Train-miles — passenger trains . 


1.00 


Car-miles — passenger trains . . .. 


4.09 


Train-miles — mixed trains _. 


.98 


Car-miles — mixed trains . 


10.31 


Train-miles — special trains... .. ______________ . 


.76 


Car-miles — special trains ... . . ... 


12.92 






Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 
Ton-miles — revenue freight 


17.30 

18.56 

$ .30684 


18.27 


Ton-miles — all freight. 

Freight revenue . 


19 .37 
$ 0.31966 


Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 
Passenger-miles — revenue 


16.46 
$ 0.51909 


15.43 


Passenger revenue .. ... 


$ 0.51884 






Miscellaneous Averages: 


119.06 
103 .69 
117.87 
22.91 
$ 2.11181 
.01774 
.72253 
.03154 
78.39 


124 .67 


Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 


102 .59 
123.16 


Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight . 


36.34 
$ 2.18133 


Revenue per ton-mile of freight .. ... . 


.01750 




1 .22204 


Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent).. _ 


.03363 
75.79 







Part II— 4 



50 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— ENTIRE LINE 






1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat. . . . 


3 

435 

111 

11 

460 

352 

214 

5,547 

2,356 

2,927 

1 

1,270 

3,192 

1,149 

531 

1,850 


75 

8,541 

1,370 

157 

4,794 

3,476 

2,515 

53,378 

20,514 

58,615 

13 

12,510 

49,011 

11,316 

7,892 

27,860 


9 

316 

155 

7 

442 

359 

205 

8,234 

2,729 

3,058 

4 

299 

2,497 

1,770 

476 

1,314 


281 




5,980 


Oats 


2,261 




50 




5,521 




4,112 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa 


2,444 




78,274 




23,285 




61,935 




68 




3,174 




38,427 




16,682 




7,055 




18,356 






Totals 


20,409 


262,037 


21,874 


267,905 






Animals and Products: 


107 
53 
11 
53 
1 
50 


1,036 
545 
106 
515 

7 
484 


142 
27 

7 
43 
11 
78 

2 


1,541 




287 




161 




418 




195 




670 




34 


Wool . 


1 
15 

394 


5 

118 

6,485 






12 
335 


158 




8,689 






Totals 


685 


9,301 


657 


12,153 






Products of Mines: 


17 

131 

8 


303 

5,888 

217 


21 

117 

2 

1 

13,224 

2 

134 

136 

4 


359 




5,224 


Coke 


56 




40 




10,318 

4 

95 

111 

17 


525,919 

119 

2,969 

1,955 

273 


643,065 




37 




4,047 


Salt 


2,774 




80 






Totals . 


10,701 


537, 643 


13,641 


655,682 








NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



51 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Commodity 



1922 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 
of Tons 
:2,0001bs.) 



1923 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



Products op Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood. 
Ties 



Pulp wood 

Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and headings 
Other products of forests.. 



Totals. 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, syrup, glucose, and molasses 

Iron, pig and bloom. 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 

Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 

automobiles 

Automobiles and auto trucks. 

Household goods and second-hand furniture 

Furniture (new) 

"Beverages 

Ice 



Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives 

Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products). 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 



Totals- 



Grand totals, carload traffic. 
Merchandise — all L. C. L. freight.. 



Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic. 



9,356 
379 



13,525 
50 



23,316 



1,322 
559 
108 



83 
75 

2 

206 

184 

4,017 

626 

49 

95 

103 

187 

38 

6 

979 

7,498 

7 

989 

309 

62 

1,782 



,286 



74,397 



260,767 
10,025 

135 
318,117 

905 



589,949 



31,836 

16,408 

1,004 



2,279 

1,192 

28 

3,264 

4,933 

135,897 

12,344 

788 

1,745 

653 

1,443 

247 

86 

8,429 

159,608 

123 

23,888 

2,500 

1,133 

23,043 



432,871 



1,831,801 
149,585 



1,981,386 



12,029 

1,426 

20 

14,964 

240 



,679 



1,342 

608 

170 

2 

116 

189 

4 

203 

109 

4,476 

736 

46 

70 

170 

198 

54 

7 

1,178 

6,475 

4 

953 

211 

77 

1,973 



19,371 



84,222 



338,302 

40,254 

416 

371,745 

4,546 



755,263 



32,954 

17,601 

2,002 

82 

3,402 

3,782 

69 

3,047 

4,264 

151,076 

14,165 

827 



1,048 

1,378 

360 

81 

9,356 

158,292 

51 

23,876 

1,719 

1,389 

27,691 



459,398 



2,150,401 
134,980 



2,285,381 



52 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 























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NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



53 






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54 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





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Trust 












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NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



55 






TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TAXES 





Name of State 


Amount Charged to 
Tax Accruals" in 


"Railway 
Income \ 




1922 


1923 




$ 56,968.31 
338,456.69 


$ 


63,672.04 




385,839.42 








Totals 


395,425.00 




449,511.46 







UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TAXES 






Kind of Tax 


Amount Charged to 
Tax Accruals" in 


"Railway- 
Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 1,196.00 
5,416.46 


$ 


2,532.00 




7,123.80 








7,412.46. 




9,655.80 








402,837.46 




459,167.26 







56 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 





1922 


1923 


Class of Employees 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 

Executives, general officers, and assistants 

Division officers, assistants, and staff assistants -- 


24 
16 


$ 148,748 
61,155 


24 
16 


$ 147,586 
60,284 


Totals 


40 


209,903 


40 


207,870 






Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 


4 

3 

2 
27 

20 

10 

203 

60 

5 

10 

41 

4 

4 

2 
9 


11,093 

7,472 

1,537 
61,136 

33,181 

17,865 
297, 795 

77,980 
5,947 

15,714 

52,619 
7,314 
9,680 

1,411 

6,028 
93 

9,720 
27,202 

9,031 
46,834 
34,912 
10,560 


3 

2 


9,392 


Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 
ants (B) . --------- 


4,620 


Subprofessional engineering and laboratory as- 




Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments). . 
Chief clerks (minor departments) and assistant 


25 

20 

8 

212 

57 

5 
13 
39 

4 

3 

2. 
8 


58,901 
33,806 




16,333 


Clerks (B) . .. 


329,954 


Clerks (C)„- 


70,975 


Mechanical device operators (office) 


6,010 
19,957 




49,684 




7,353 




7,920 


Telephone switchboard operators and office assist- 


1,410 




5,552 






Lieutenants and sergeants of police 


5 
16 

9 

17 
17 

4 


5 
1 
9 

17 

22 

4 


9,150 
1,700 




8,618 




47,508 


Traffic agents, advertising and development agents 


46,558 
10,560 






Totals— 


112 
360 


232,203 
512,971 


109 
350 


233,967 




511,994 







NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



57 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION— Continued 





1922 


1923 


Class of Employees 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Maintenance of Way and Structures: 


9 

3 

15 

71 


$ 22,680 

6,300 

25,262 

85,011 


9 
3 

14 

91 

1 

3 

6 
20 

4 

1 

130 

58 

366 

13 

1 

2 


\ 
$ 23,670 




6,302 




22,928 




92,176 




800 


Masons, bricklayers, plasterers, and plumbers 


1 
2 
4 
21 
3 


74 
5,103 
4,274 
11,012 
4,701 


92 
6,537 


Portable steam equipment operator helpers 


6,579 
9,843 


Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers) 
Gang foremen (bridge and building, signal and 


7,203 
1,202 




121 
33 

388 

7 
1 

2 


159,455 

28,450 

215,645 

5,367 

2,580 

4,862 


182,268 




36,134 




195,020 


Maintenance of way laborers (other than track 
and roadway) and gardeners and farmers 

General foremen and supervising inspectors (sig- 
nal, telegraph, and electrical transmission) 

Assistant general foremen (signal, telegraph, and 
electrical transmission) and signal and telegraph 


11,571 
2,685 

4,074 




341 




4 


6,796 


5 


8,805 






Totals- 
Daily basis . 


12 
673 


30, 122 
557,423 


12 

715 


30,429 




587,975 







58 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



ATLANTIC AND NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 

Leased b^ Norfolk Southern Railroad Company 
OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Ernest M. Green 


New Bern, N. C. 




Charles V. Webb.... 


Morehead City, N. C. 




W. Stamps Howard 

Walter D. Siler 


Tarboro, N. C. 




Pittsboro, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Ernest M. Green, New Bern ; H. D. Bateman, Wilson ; Mrs. Palmer Jerman, Raleigh ; 
W. B. Blades, New Bern; Courtney Mitchell, Kinston ; W. C. Petty, Charlotte; D. F. 
McKinne, Louisburg ; W. H. McElwee, Raleigh ; J. Y. Joyner, LaGrange ; L. H. Cutler, 
New Bern ; George P. Folk, Raleigh ; C. L. Ives, New Bern. 



HISTORY 

Organized January 20, 1854. Original charter, chapter 136, Public Laws of North Caro- 
lina, 1852-1853. Amended by chapter 232, Public Laws of North Carolina, 1854-1855. 



PROPERTY OPERATED 



Goldsboro, N. C, to Morehead City, N. C. (miles). 



94 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment per mile 



$ 1,797,200.00 

18,917.90 

325,000.00 

3,421.05 

2,122,200.00 

22,122.99 



1,797,200.00 

18,917.90 

325,000.00 

3,421.05 

2,122,200.0 

22,122.9 9 



Note. — This road is operated by Norfolk Southern Railroad Company, and revenues, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



SEABOARD AIE LINE RAILWAY 



59 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 



Name 



Official Address 



President 

First Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Secretary.. 

Treasurer 

General Counsel at New York 

General Counsel at Washington 

General Solicitor 

General Auditor 

Chief Engineer 

Chief of Motive Power and Equipment... 
Assistant to Vice-President 



S. Davies Warfield 

Charles R. Capps 

M. J. Caples 

W. R. Bonsai 

L. R. Powell, Jr 

W. L. Seddon 

W. L. Stanley— 

Robert L. Nutt 

Robert L. Nutt 

Hornblower, Miller & Garrison 

Forney Johnston 

James F. Wright 

L. L. Knight 

W. D. Faucette— 

J. E. O'Brien 

R. P. Jones 



Baltimore, Md. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Portsmouth, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Baltimore, Md. 



DIRECTORS 

Milton E. Ailes, Washington, D. C. ; M. J. Caples, Norfolk, Va. ; Charles R. Capps, 
Norfolk, Va. ; F. N. B. Close, New York, N. Y. ; James C. Colgate, New York, N. Y. ; 
Pierpont V. Davis, New York, N. Y. ; Mills B. Lane, Savannah, Ga. ; L. F. Loree, New York, 
N. Y. ; Robert F. Maddox, Atlanta, Ga. ; J. Wm. Middendorf, Baltimore, Md. ; Robert L. 
Nutt, New York, N. Y. ; L. R. Powell, Jr., Baltimore, Md. ; Robert C. Ream, New York, 
N. Y. ; J. P. Taliaferro, Jacksonville, Fla. ; S. Davies Warfield, Baltimore, Md. ; A. H. 
Woodard, Woodard, Ala. ; D. F. Yoakum, New York, N. Y. 



HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report: Seaboard Air Line Railway. 

2. Date of organization : August 5, 1897, as Richmond, Petersburg and Carolina Railroad 
Company, successor to Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company, which latter was incor- 
porated by Acts of General Assembly of Virginia, February 23, 1882, and of North Carolina, 
February 7, 1883. Receivers appointed and assumed charge of properties January 2, 1908. 
Adjustment plan approved and decree directing receivers to turn over the property and 
business under their control to Seaboard Air Line Railway at midnight, November 4, 1909, 
entered and filed October 18, 1909. Conditions prescribed in said decree duly complied with, 
and decree discharging receiver entered and filed December 18, 1909. 

3. Under laws of what government, state or territory organized? If more than one, 
name all. Give specific reference to each statute and all amendments thereof: 

Virginia, February 23, 1882, as Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company, and North 
Carolina, February 7, 1883, as Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company, the purchaser of 
whose property and franchises at judicial sale became incorporated as Richmond, Petersburg 
and Carolina Railroad Company, which, by Act of Virginia Assembly, January 12, 1900, 
and Act of North Carolina Assembly, January 31, 1899, became legal successors of Virginia 
and Carolina Railroad Company. Change of name to Seaboard Air Line Railway authorized 
by Circuit Court of City of Richmond, Virginia, April 10, 1900. 

4. If a consolidated or a merging company, name all constituent and all merging com- 
panies. Give specific reference to charters or general laws governing organization of each, 
and all amendments of same. 

The following constituent companies were parties to the consolidation effected November 
7, 1901, forming Seaboard Air Line Railway: 

SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY, organized as Richmond, Petersburg and Carolina 
Railroad Company, successor to Virginia and Carolina Railroad Company. Incorporated 



60 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

under laws of Virginia, Acts February 23, 1882, amended March 6, 1886, February 24, 1888, 
February 12, 1890 ; consolidation authorized by Act of January 12, 1900 ; of North Carolina, 
Acts of February 7, 1883, January 31, 1899, February 22, 1899 ; consolidation authorized by 
Act of February 27, 1901. 

RALEIGH AND GASTON RAILROAD COMPANY, incorporated under laws of North 
Carolina, Act of January 29, 1851, amended and enlarged by Acts of December 25, 1852, 
January 20, 1855, February 23, 1861, December 16, 1865, January 19, 1866, March 4, 1867, 
December 4, 1871, March 1, 1897 ; consolidation authorized by Act of February 16, 1899, as 
amended by Act ratified February 24, 1899. 

RALEIGH AND AUGUSTA AIR LINE RAILROAD COMPANY, to which name was 
changed, by Act ratified December 13, 1871 ; organized as Chatham Railroad Company, under 
laws of North Carolina, Act of February 15, 1861, amended, modified, and enlarged by Acts 
of February 23, 1861, February 5, 1863, January 30, 1862, February 10, 1862, August 3, 1868, 
August 15, 1868, April 10, 1869, April 1, 1871, December 13, 1871, February 23, 1885, March 

6, 1891 ; consolidation authorized by Act of February 16, 1899. 

CAROLINA CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under the laws of North 
Carolina, Act of March 1, 1873, and by Act of January 18, 1881 ; legal possessor of rights, 
powers and franchises of Carolina Central Railway Company, incorporated by Act of Feb- 
ruary 20, 1873 ; charter amended, modified, and enlarged by Acts of March 2, 1887, March 7, 
1887 ; consolidation authorized by Act ratified February 16, 1899. 

GEORGIA, CAROLINA AND NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, a consolidated corpora- 
tion of the States of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia ; name was changed by 
Act of Legislature of State of South Carolina, approved December 24, 1886, from Chester, 
Greenwood and Abbeville Railroad Company, organized under laws of South Carolina, Act of 
December 22, 1885 ; consolidation authorized under Act approved February 27, 1899, and 
under general laws of State ; incorporated under laws of Georgia by Act approved December 

7, 1886; consolidation effected under general law; incorporated under laws of North Caro- 
lina by Act ratified January 18, 1887 ; consolidation authorized by Act ratified February 16, 
1899. 

SEABOARD AIR LINE BELT RAILROAD COMPANY, incorporated July 22, 1892, and 
consolidated under general laws of State of Georgia. 

PALMETTO RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of South Carolina, Act ap- 
proved December 21, 1882, amended by Acts of December 26, 1884, and December 22, 1886 ; 
consolidation authorized under Act approved February 27, 1899 ; laws of North Carolina, Act 
of February 7, 1883, amended by Act of February 3, 1891 ; consolidation authorized by Act 
ratified February 16, 1899. 

CHESTERFIELD AND KERSHAW RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of 
South Carolina, Act approved December 24, 1889 ; consolidation authorized under Act ap- 
proved February 27, 1899. 

SOUTHBOUND RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of South Carolina, Act 
approved February 9, 1882, amended and enlarged by Acts approved December 24, 1886, 
December 24, 1887, December 24, 1889, December 24, 1890, December 24, 1892 ; consolidation 
authorized under Act approved February 27, 1899 ; Georgia, organized under Act approved 
September 26, 1889, recognizing and confirming organization under certificate of incorpora- 
tion obtained from Secretary of State, November 5, 1888. 

SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY, the corporation formed by such consolidation, was, 
by agreement dated June 27, 1903, filed in the office of the Secretary of State for the States 
of Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, August 15, 1903 ; and for the 
State of North Carolina, August 17, 1903, and under such general and special laws of the 
several States merged with the Florida Central and Peninsular Railway Company, the cor- 
poration formed by the merger and consolidation of the Florida Central and Peninsular 
Railroad Company. Incorporated under the laws of Florida, by letters patent, issued 
November 17, 1888, amended and enlarged December 13, 1892, and by Act of Legislature 
approved June 4, 1897. 

The following constituent companies of the Seaboard Air Line Railway were purchased: 

DURHAM AND NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY, organized under the laws of 
North Carolina, Act of February 2, 1887, acquired under indenture dated September 13, 
1901 ; purchase authorized under laws of Virginia, Act of January 12, 1900 ; North Caro- 
lina, Acts of February 16, 1899, and February 27, 1901. 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 61 

LOGANSVILLE AND LAWRENCEVILLE RAILROAD OF GEORGIA, organized under 
the general laws of Georgia under charter issued by the Secretary of State, March 30, 1898, 
acquired under indenture dated February 27, 1902 ; purchase authorized under laws of 
Virginia and North Carolina by special acts of Legislature, as indicated above, and general 
laws of Georgia. 

GEORGIA AND ALABAMA RAILWAY, a consolidated corporation under the general 
laws of Georgia and Alabama, organized under general laws of Georgia under charter 
issued by Secretary of State, July 26, 1895, certificates amending and enlarging charter filed 
or recorded January 25, 1896, November 9, 1898; organized under general laws of Alabama 
under charter issued by Secretary of State, July 20, 1895, amended by acts of Legislature, 
February 8, 1897, and February 3, 1899; acquired under indenture dated February 20, 1902; 
purchase authorized under laws of Virginia and North Carolina by special acts of Legisla- 
ture, as indicated above, and general laws of South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama. 

OXFORD AND COAST LINE RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of North 
Carolina, Act of March 5, 1891, acquired under indenture dated June 28, 1906 ; purchase 
authorized under special laws of Virginia and North Carolina, as indicated above, and 
under general laws of other States. 

CATAWBA VALLEY RAILWAY, organized May 9, 1906, under general laws of South 
Carolina, particularly Sections 1917-1934, inclusive, Code of 1902 ; acquired under indenture 
dated September 27, 1909 ; purchase authorized under special statutes of Virginia and North 
Carolina and under general laws of South Carolina. 

FLORIDA WEST SHORE RAILWAY, organized October 20, 1899, under general laws 
of Florida, letters patent incorporating the United States and West Indies Railroad and 
Steamship Company, issued January- 5, 1900 ; name changed to Florida West Shore Railway 
by resolutions adopted May 5, 1903, which were approved, and authority to exercise powers 
and privileges of the corporation granted to said Florida West Shore Railway by letters 
patent issued May 9, 1903, and charter further amended, modified and enlarged by letters 
patent issued June 17, 1903, and August 22, 1906 ; acquired by indenture dated September 
30, 1909 ; purchase authorized under special laws of States of Virginia and North Carolina 
and general laws of the State of Florida. 

TALLAHASSEE, PERRY, AND SOUTHEASTERN RAILWAY, organized November 22, 
1905, under general laws of Florida, and acquired by purchase the properties of the Talla- 
hassee Southeastern Railway Company, chartered originally as the Florida, Georgia and 
Western Railway Company, by Act of Legislature approved May 7, 1891 ; charter amended 
and enlarged by Chapter 4263 of the Laws of Florida, approved May 20, 1893 ; name changed 
to Tallahassee Southeastern Railway, Chapter 4477, Laws of Florida, approved May 30, 1895 ; 
charter further amended and enlarged by Chapter 4624 of the Laws of Florida, approved 
May 31, 1897, and Chapter 5023 of the Laws of Florida, approved May 28, 1901 ; acquired 
by Seaboard Air Line Railway by indenture dated September 29, 1909 ; purchase authorized 
under special laws of Virginia and North Carolina and general laws of the State of Florida. 

PLANT CITY, ARCADIA AND GULF RAILWAY, organized February 7, 1905, under 
general laws of State of Florida, to operate the railroad formerly owned by the Wannee 
Lumber and Veneer Company, and originally a wooden tram-road, constructed in 1898, for 
use in its logging operations ; reorganized under general laws of Florida February 7, 1905 ; 
acquired by indenture dated September 28, 1909 ; purchase authorized under special laws of 
States of Virginia and North Carolina and general laws of State of Florida. 

ATLANTIC, SUWANNEE RIVER, AND GULF RAILWAY COMPANY, incorporated 
under laws of Florida by Act approved May 24, 1893 ; acquired by indenture dated Septem- 
ber 30, 1909 ; purchase authorized under special laws of Virginia and North Carolina and 
general laws of Florida. 

ATLANTA AND BIRMINGHAM AIR LINE RAILWAY, a consolidated corporation com- 
posed of : 

(a) The East and West Railroad Company, incorporated in Alabama under general laws 
by letters patent issued January 11, 1894 ; incorporated in Georgia January 15, 1896, and 
branch line from Roekmart to point near Marietta, Georgia, built under general laws (Code 
1895), and 

(b) Chattahoochee Terminal Railway, incorporated and chartered under and by virtue of 
general laws of State of Georgia (Code 1895), February 16, 1903. Consolidation effected 
under general laws of States of Georgia and Alabama, May 20, 1903 ; decree directing 
receivers (appointed February 24, 1908, and March 17, 1909, respectively) to turn over 



62 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

the property and business under their control to the railway, entered and filed October 19, 
1909 ; conditions prescribed in said decree duly complied with and receivers discharged by 
decree entered December 30, 1909 ; acquired by Seaboard Air Line Railway under indenture 
dated September 30, 1909 ; purchase authorized under special laws of Virginia and North 
Carolina and general laws of States of Georgia and Alabama. 

SEABOARD AND ROANOKE RAILROAD COMPANY, incorporated under laws of 
Virginia, Act of February 27, 1846, and prior acts, as successor to Portsmouth and Roanoke 
Railroad Company, incorporated by Act passed March 8, 1832, united with Roanoke Rail- 
road Company under Act of February 1, 1848 ; charter modified, amended, and enlarged by 
Acts of March 17, 1849, January 10, 1851, March 28, 1851, February 19, 1852, March 19, 
1852 ; permanent provisions of charter declared and acts inconsistent therewith repealed by 
Act passed January 26, 1853, amended and enlarged January 9, 1856, February 18, 1858, 
January 18, 1872, November 29, 1884, March 1, 1886, January 26, 1892, under laws of 
North Carolina, Act of January 16, 1849, uniting the Roanoke Railroad Company, incorpo- 
rated under Act ratified January 15, 1847, with Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad Company, 
modified, amended, and enlarged by Act of January 29, 1849, December 28, 1850, January 
17, 1851, January 28, 1851 ; permanent provisions of charter declared and acts inconsistent 
therewith repealed by Act ratified November 29, 1852, amended and enlarged by Acts Jan- 
uary 9, 1855, February 2, 1857. Acquired by Seaboard Air Line Railway by deed dated 
September 15, 1911 ; purchase authorized under general and special laws of Virginia and 
North Carolina. 

ROANOKE AND TAR RIVER RAILROAD COMPANY, organized under laws of North 
Carolina, Acts of February 25, 1871, and March 5, 1885, amended and enlarged by Acts of 
February 28, 1887, and March 2, 1887 ; acquired by Seaboard Air Line Railway by deed 
dated September 15, 1911 ; purchase authorized under general and special laws of Virginia 
and North Carolina. 

In addition to the above the GEORGIA AND ALABAMA TERMINAL COMPANY (eon- 
trolled through stock ownership and lease) , organized under laws of Georgia under charter 
issued November 9, 1898, forms and is operated as a part of the Seaboard Air Line Railway 
system. 

If a reorganized company, give name of original corporation, refer to laws under which 
it was organized, and state the occasion for the reorganization: 

Reorganization effected without sale or foreclosure by restoration of properties to owners 
because of conditions making such a course best to the interest of stockholders and creditors 
of the corporation. 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



63 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$193,702,841.46 

108,260.39 

177 04 


Investments: 


$197,943,748.09 

116,116.56 

1,032.04 

1,286,608.74 

746,918.72 

3,087,493.53 

1,189,710.23 

498,999.39 

2,868,249.18 

83,859.82 
22,850.00 
81,115.41 
125,261.28 


$ 205,905,461.35 


Improvements on leased railway property 


121,966.87 
1,032.04 


745,771.71 
752 493 66 


Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 


1,024,205.67 
835,943.63 


2,413,593.53 


Investments in affiliated companies — 


3,388,293.53 


1,189,710.23 




1,323,710.23 


505, 102 .03 


Notes. _ -- 


741,905.12 


2,504,610.26 
83,859.82 




4,266,945.82 


Other investments — 


84,572.82 


752,850.00 




30,850.00 


70,122.99 


Notes - - 


30,636.00 


185,673.10 
63,000.00 


Advances 


171,794.97 








203,078,066.22 


208,051,962.99 


217,927,318.05 




Current Assets: 
Cash.. 




2,455,187.59 


2,664,709.72 

4,799,381.64 

33,808.97 

861,854.91 

342,550.96 

1,795,355.81 

4,554,210.97 

8,879.11 

5,201.98 

382,503.25 


4,921,791.65 


897,119.89 




1,059,568.57 


24,265.92 




43,575.23 


893,523.58 

194,427.48 

1,354,281.07 


Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 


1,224,275.76 

190,617.12 

2,021,846.90 


4,101,904.27 




5,088,110.42 


665,617.55 




3,302.04 


8,167.71 




3,867.60 


526,669.43 




314,302.47 








11,121,164.49 


15,448,457.32 


14,871,257.76 




Deferred Assets: 




297,091.76 


287,775.76 

5,887,704.96 

538,923.76 


65,930.96 


5,851,441.89 




1,801.26 


676,028.39 




473,145.86 




Total deferred assets 




6,824,562.04 


6,714,404.48 


540,878.58 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance. . 
Discount on funded debt 




25,284.90 
4,477,555.66 


33,180.52 
4,501,777.50 
15,467,692.34 
3,790,753.73 


102,924.49 
4,587,539.93 


17,223,378.15 


U. S. Government unadjusted debits 




1,467,713.99 


Other unadjusted debits _ 


1,883,567.17 








23,193,932.70 


23,793,404.09 


6,574,031.59 




Grand totals 




244,217,725.45 


254,008,228.88 


239,913,485.98 









64 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— 


Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


§60,950,800.00 


Stock: 


$60,950,800.00 


$ 60,950,500.00 




Long-term Debt: 




134,700,900.00 


143,473,900.00 
474,013.11 


152,456,900.00 


100,000.00 
199,480.72 


Nonnegotiable debt to affiliated companies — 
Notes 


420,362.43 










135,000,380.72 


143,947,913.11 


152,877,262.43 




Current Liabilities: 




8,547,500.00 


7,692,500.00 

1,091,173.91 

5,039,139.15 

384,363.17 

782,532.84 

9.00 

97,000.00 

1,377,001.57 

104,536.77 

290,140.35 


32,560.19 


1,229,218.84 

4,400,117.52 

436,175.33 


Traffic and car-service balances payable 

Audited accounts and wages payable 


961,476.79 

5,276,063.94 

282,643.86 


799,965.29 




682,386.78 


9.00 




9.00 


97,000.00 




129,500.00 


1,217,416.23 




2,124,254.57 


120,394.30 




33,288.26 


260,690.04 




241,264.71 








17,108,486.55 


16,858,396.76 


9,763,448.10 




Deferred Liabilities: 




67,129.63 


7,168.93 
410,837.10 


26.55 


387,633.26 




389,280.85 








454,762.89 


418,006.03 


389,307.40 




Unadjusted Credits: 




589,270.37 


1,021,367.17 
1,264,655.82 
5,302,176.54 
16,132,324.13 
3,457,944.84 


540,675.17 


1,197,863.57 




1,448,490.14 


5,765,699.93 




4,653,238.52 


16,047,853.52 






1,151,867.29 




1,607,316.19 








24,752,554.68 


27,178,468.50 


8,249,720.02 




Corporate Surplus: 

Additions to property through income and surplus 
Funded debt retired through income and surplus. 

Total appropriated surplus 




183,336.61 
3,896.12 


242,020.24 
3,896.12 


280,381.71 
3,896.12 


187,232.73 
5,763,507.88 


245,916.36 
4,408,728.12 


284,277.83 
7,398,970.20 








5,950,740.61 


4,654,644.48 


7,683,248.03 








244,217,725.45 


254,008,228.88 


239,913,485.98 









SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



65 



ROAD OPERATED 



Name of Road or Track 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 

Second 

Main 

Track 


Miles of 

Industrial 

Tracks 


Miles of 

Yard 

Track and 

Sidings, 

etc. 


Total 


Main line— 1923. 


3,387.96 
79.17 


13.34 


217.12 
23.58 


765 .00 
32.62 


4,383.42 




135.37 










3,467.13 


13.34 


240.70 


797.62 


4,518.79 


Proprietary Line: 


10.09 




.47 


1.06 


11.62 








Leased: 


57.48 
2.35 




.32 
1.98 


9.05 

.75 


66.85 






5.08 










59 .83 




2.30 


9.80 


71.93 








Contract: 


2.52 




.91 
2.05 




3.43 








2.05 


Athens Terminal Co 






1.44 


1.44 




1.41 




.15 

.74 


1.56 






1.35 


2.09 












3.93 




3.85 


2.79 


10.57 








Trackage Rights: 
A. C. L 


1.71 
.95 
.26 
.57 
.13 
2.60 
2.58 
.15 








1.71 


A. C. L 








.95 


C. U. S. Co. 








.26 


C. of Ga. Ry 








.57 


A. P. T. Co.... 








.13 


W. and A. Ry _ 








2.60 


So. Ry 








2.58 


So. Ry 








.15 


So. Ry _. 


9.98 






9.98 


S. U. S. Co... 


4.39 
.30 
.27 
15.04 
.49 
.76 
.24 






4.39 


Birmingham Terminal Co.. 










Birmingham Belt Co 










K. C. M. and B. Ry 




.40 


5.92 


21.36 


M. U. S. Co 




.49 


Jacksonville Terminal Co... 








.76 


T. U. S. Co... 








.24 


Tracks owned exclusively by other 
roads over which S. A. L. has track- 
age rights . _ 






.31 
7.31 


.31 


Joint track, proportion owned by 








7.31 


Tracks owned by shippers 






41.26 


41.26 












30.61 


9.98 


41.66 


13.54 


95.85 


Grand totals 


3,571.65 


23.32 


288 .98 


824.81 


4,708.76 







Part II— 5 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





















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SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



67 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Freight 


$31,998,052.10 

8,936,216.53 

61,542.89 

4,761.02 

1,109,555.04 

2,045,574.54 

12,129.20 

10,362.49 

317,202.99 

20,972.69 

65.00 

1,665.00 


$ 36,574,383.75 




10,349,863.99 




68,594.88 




3,922.69 


Mail 


1,207,878.36 




2,303,765.84 




43,365.46 


Milk 


11,025.52 


Switching... . 


386,437.99 




17,206.66 


Other freight-train. . .. _. 






2,970.00 








44,518,099.49 


50,969,415.14 






Dining and buffet.. ... ._ . 


271,137.73 

2,717.90 

42,122.95 

217.98 

169,657.59 

1,472.39 

116,795.59 

2,334.84 

9,271.74 

480,138.78 


361,639.21 




2,769.51 


Station, train, and boat privileges . . 


30,640.32 


Parcel room . .. . ... 


36.20 


Storage — freight ....... .... 


150,658.75 




1,654.34 


Demurrage .. .... 


194,545.77 


Power ......... 


2,118.02 


Rents of buildings and other property . 


9,863.51 


Miscellaneous 


461,630.47 






Total incidental operating revenues 


1,095,431.48 


1,215,556.10 


Joint facility — Cr ... 


66,618.60 
1,101.38 


65,845.66 


Joint facility — Dr.. 


1,706.54 








65,517.22 


64,139.12 






Total railway operating revenues. .. 


45,679,048.19 


52,249,110.36 







68 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES EARNED WITHIN THE STATE 





1922 


1923 


Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


On Intrastate 
Traffic 


On Interstate 
Traffic 


On Intrastate 
Traffic 


On Interstate 
Traffic 


Freight . .. . 


$1,987,569.77 

1,019,837.03 

4,616.32 

155,149.05 

76,156.56 

807.63 

540.64 

11,703.62 

3,238.37 

65.00 


$7,861,398.97 

1,397,605.19 

6,223.86 

155,149.07 

305,083.68 

1,328.84 

673 .93 

42,927.64 

3,322.63 


$2,400,067.94 

1,042,135.91 

4,637.71 

166,523.28 

86,716.02 

3,316.79 

160.66 

12,638.14 

6,598.09 


$ 8,940,872.54 




1,687,522.68 




7,477.92 


Mail ... 


166,523.28 




319,757.65 




4,341.88 


Milk 


2,765.01 




46,571.97 




678 .45 














Total rail-line transportation revenue- 


3,259,683.99 


9,773,713.81 


3,722,794.54 


11,176,511.38 






74,005.25 

4,241.12 

25,698.55 

318.11 

34,025.05 




85,614.80 




3,178.56 
6,625.31 

243 .95 
8,832.04 

528 .45 
1,776.68 


1,966.44 
8,276.73 

299.91 
10,914.96 

783 .23 
2,518.35 


3,446.34 




29,674.23 




470 .95 




40,531.48 


Rents of buildings and other property 




59,809.60 


6,726.32 






Total incidental operating revenue 


21,184.99 


198,097.68 


24,759.62 


166,464.12 




6,181.90 




6,918.28 










Total railway operating revenues 


3,287,050.88 


9,971,811.49 


3,754,472.44 


11,342,975.50 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



69 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 




Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Maintenance of Way and Structures: 


1 429,144.71 

29,079.98 

321,856.87 

631.65 

15,023.37 

335,235.76 

153,955.01 

1,323,865.42 

25,981.54 

129,613.43 

78,757.09 

191,044.16 

154.35 

11,128.84 

142,749.81 

1,196,451.89 

129.41 

1,631.96 

9,128.15 

58,838.68 

172,694.93 

22,065.27 

56,139.04 

26,652.82 


$ 461,310.69 




36,460.40 




391,496.18 




317.11 




19,863.43 




391,970.26 




219,174.04 




1,794,989.41 




45,208.69 




248,767.14 




122,199.82 




281,582.85 




806.82 




22,568.99 




213,510.40 




1,497,533.94 




18.93 




2,870.97 




7,391.04 




69,796.57 




272,692.56 




45,115.35 




75,276.33 




50,510.69 




130,177.57 




100,367.65 

35,625.21 

88,366.81 

54,360.98 

3,497.34 

720.16 

2,455.60 

1,335.89 

181 .63 

1,983.90 

42,657.30 

80,178.75 

8,997.42 

201 .84 

22,429.41 

66,965.89 

10,458.86 

61.52 




Storage warehouses . . .. . .. 


35,910.62 


Wharves and docks .. .. 


67,978.26 


Telegraph and telephone lines.. . . . 


98,125.03 


Signals and interlockers .. 


10,113.84 


Power plant buildings.. 


1,353.10 




647 .80 




1,381.14 






Paving... .. . 


6,492.92 




61,923.19 


Small tools and supplies.. 


94,164.94 




3,758.37 


Assessments for public improvements 


515.15 


Injuries to persons 


24,747.90 


Insurance ... .. . 


57,549.65 


Stationery and printing ... __ 


11,746.60 


Other expenses _. 


1,533.65 






Totals 


5,252,800.30 
132,445.26 
27,153.47 


6,879,552.34 




128,479.63 




35,669.39 






Total maintenance of way and structures 


5,358,092.09 


6,972,362.58 







70 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Power plant machinery 

Steam locomotives— repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation 

Steam locomotives — retirements 

Freight-train cars — repairs 

Freight-train cars — depreciation 

Freight-train cars— retirements 

Passenger-train cars — repairs 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation 

Passenger-train cars — retirements 

Motor equipment of cars — repairs.. 

Motor equipment of cars — depreciation. 
Motor equipment of cars — retirements.. 

Floating equipment — repairs 

Floating equipment — depreciation 

Floating equipment — retirements 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — retirements 

Miscellaneous equipment — repairs 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation. 
Miscellaneous equipment — retirements. . 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals- 
Maintaining joint equipment at terminals- 
Total maintenance of equipment 



-Dr.. 
-Cr.. 



Teaffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies. 

Advertising. 

Traffic associations 

Industrial and immigration bureaus. 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses. 



Total traffic. 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



376, 
163, 

38, 
,377, 
298, 

54 
,589 
346 

56 
772 

67 

19 

10 



240.75 
548.66 
751.12 
025 .04 
877.22 
223 .78 

082 .28 
238.67 
589 .02 

424 .29 
692 .07 
810.37 
585.27 
644 .76 



32,830.96 
1,598.62 



71,031.24 

22,512.19 

8,143.08 

5,618.31 

370.94 

952 .44 

33,984.16 

46,803.59 

15,689.26 

5,808.34 



8,405,839.81 

20,778.07 

1,644.91 



8,424,972.97 



478,031.02 

622,851.21 

58,886.66 

13,007.92 

79,300.47 

667 .23 

225,244.76 

287.46 



1,478,276.73 



1923 



377, 

185, 

47, 

3,899, 

307 

174 

1,784 

532 

103 

1,085 

95 

37 

1 

1 

24 

2 

126 

24 

1 



516.20 
766.13 
011.31 
418.36 
386.35 
468 .40 
026 .82 
941 .49 
165.91 
396.10 
824 .32 
365.14 
383 .22 
692 .28 
069 .79 
564 .93 
660.69 
558 .52 
534 .24 
444.65 
674.11 
994.10 
768.41 
598 .05 
820.12 
795.19 
718.29 
995.91 



i, 924, 302 .41 

24,840.40 

2,105.81 



,947,037.00 



513,994.16 
672,410.53 
101,524.67 
25,268.22 
112,436.32 

763 .30 
215,828.51 

240.91 



1,642,466.62 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



71 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE-Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Transportation — Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses— yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — train .... 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to livestock on right of way 

Loss and damage — freight . 

Loss and damage — baggage 

Injuries to persons 

. Totals 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr.. 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr 

Total transportation — rail line 



530,506.94 

300,856.87 

,917,288.93 

78,504.74 

165,029.23 

463,527.97 

902,662.47 

19,367.74 

530,548.93 

578,473.78 

31,585.56 

10,661.08 

10,624.77 

219,746.37 

28,462.11 

949,915.57 

8,629.51 

065,797.15 

210,362.23 

121,651.68 

62,052.15 

706,028.18 

432,361.82 

466,336.53 

10,808.02 

67,827.78 

45,043.18 

92,630.39 

59,706.74 

124,427.25 

19,246.75 

54,491.63 

82,309.90 

114,160.88 

136,254.95 

377,533.20 

1,140.14 

372,818.74 



18,364,381.86 

410,695.99 

113,803.08 

85,296.62 

79,532.51 



18,667,038.8 



540 

427 

3,027 

83 

176 

474 , 

1,042, 

24, 

617, 

666, 

32, 

6, 

13, 

234, 

25, 

2,133, 

8, 

4,411, 

215. 

63, 

74, 

703, 

2,700, 

518, 

10, 

78, 

50, 

62, 

63, 

126, 

24, 

53, 

106, 

68, 

136, 

489, 

3, 

477, 



,805.27 
,255.14 
,319.39 
,055.46 
,189.72 
,950.03 
889.69 
076.39 
954 .80 
221.18 
963 .74 
178.84 
346.49 
980.78 
636.75 
206 .42 
862 .50 
222 .84 
739 .82 
603 .81 
514.69 
260.81 
419.38 
166.08 
209 .76 
136.91 
432.89 
616.26 
907 .03 
430.47 
362 .84 
668.51 
996.25 
607.35 
061.76 
671 :28 
346.50 
620.44 



19,975,888.27 

436,821.96 

113,146.93 

91,341.08 

73,523.61 



20,317,380.77 



72 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES-ENTIRE LINE-Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Miscellaneous Operations: 


'$ 374,012.78 
1,564.13 
2,464.39 


$ 461,103.46 




1,536.84 




2,800.89 








378,041.30 


465,441.19 






General: 


186,080.59 

1,187,369.39 

74,390.48 

227,135.29 

2,559.07 

9,771.16 

54,164.03 

110,542.21 

66,906.92 


230,378.50 




1,255,674.33 




77,546.77 




243,302.56 




2,843.02 




11,414.33 




54,116.87 




95,691.16 




41,863.07 






Totals 


1,918,919.14 

24,865.70 

1,926.35 


2,012,830.61 




13,983.59 












1,945,711.19 


2,026,814.20 






Transportation for investment — Cr.__ . . ... 


29,248.96 


29,242.88 








36,222,884.20 


40,342,259.48 







Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 79.20 per cent for 1922; 77.21 
per cent for 1923. 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



73 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 








1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat ---.,- 


1,236 
1,980 
3,303 
956 
8,091 
8,123 
5,316 
5,323 

23,775 

11,310 
8,813 

12,949 
4,597 

11,324 

393 

5,296 


31,302 

43,240 

66,993 

16,423 

131,277 

140,113 

67,217 

58,148 

243,070 

232,500 

126,222 

158,829 

77,633 

141,249 

8,137 

76,179 


1,306 
1,859 
3,323 
1,063 
7,768 
9,040 
6,187 
6,659 
22,134 
10,218 
13,218 
7,561 
4,497 
10,744 
769 
4,056 


40,382 




45,929 


Oats - --_---_-_-__- 


66,716 




20,316 




118,591 




161,793 




78,582 




64,630 


Cotton 


225,297 
203,436 




188,254 




97,442 




79,096 




136,665 


Dried fruits and vegetables 


13,144 


Other products of agriculture 


60,418 






Totalis . . 


112,785 


1,618,552 


110,402 


1,600,691 






Animals and Products: 

Horses and mules. . . ... _. _ .. . 


1,094 

55 

1,066 

2,732 

2,993 

31 

780 

622 

49 

113 

706 


11,400 

640 

11,370 

37,482 

45,081 

447 

9,088 

7,375 

863 

2,033 

12,795 


1,173 

1,204 

70 

684 

2,710 

3,046 

92 

800 

702 

20 

178 

641 


12,671 


Cattle and calves . .. . 


12,342 


Sheep and goats... ... ._ __. . . 


949 


Hogs ... . 


6,890 


Fresh meats.. .... 


36,324 


Other packing-house products 


49,904 


Poultry ..... 


1,263 


Eggs. . ..... . ... ... 


8,459 


Butter and cheese . . 


8,610 


Wool 


239 


Hides and leather ._ .... 


3,309 


Other animals and products. 


13,412 










Totals 


11,117 


147,760 


11,320 


154,372 






Products of Mines: 


997 

19,062 

1,617 

627 

206 

38,361 

172 

633 

1,688 

21,722 


45,440 

957, 764 

51,494 

28,560 

7,793 

1,371,479 

6,170 

22,146 

37,276 

1,060,091 


2,523 

25,063 

1,885 

1,804 

315 

46,516 

11 

903 

1,615 

29,438 


122,464 


Bituminous coal.. _ _ 


1,274,744 


Coke 


59,045 


Iron ore. . ._ ... ...... 


88,393 


Other ores and concentrates. . . .. . 


11,229 


Clay, gravel, sand, and stone.. ... 


2,011,312 


Crude petroleum . . ... ... . . . 


328 


Asphaltum ... .. . .. ... ._ 


31,425 


Salt 


32,733 


Other products of mines . . ... 


1,359,242 






Totals 


85,085 


3,588,213 


110,073 


4,990,915 







74 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— Continued 



Commodity 



1922 



Number 
of 

Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



1923 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood. 
Ties 



Pulp wood 

Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and headings. 
Other products of forests 



Totals. 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, syrup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 

Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone. 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 

automobiles 

Automobiles and auto trucks.. 

Household goods and second-hand furniture 

Furniture (new) 

Beverages 

Ice 



Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives 

Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products). 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 



Totals. 



Grand totals, carload traffic. 
Merchandise — all L. C. L. freight.. 



26,103 

4,908 

273 

71,454 
7,640 



110,378 



17,412 

817 

2,100 

35 

2,602 

574 

4,002 

199 

2,832 

10,208 

11,978 

3,920 

1,394 



7,830 

1,386 

582 

371 

2,523 

28,645 

429 

12,278 

8,700 

1,036 

33,442 



156,177 



674,769 

125,262 

7,068 

1,731,743 

129,532 



26,413 

6,717 

411 

86,093 

10,856 



2,668,374 



130,490 



463,978 

23,874 

37,065 

615 

103,541 
18,287 
95,876 
5,451 
48,014 

373,603 

375,168 
97,792 
23,638 

13,845 

56,596 

14,862 

6,260 

6,256 

39,156 

575,447 

9,561 

355,724 

97,143 

21,761 

648,245 



20,099 

612 

2,028 

53 

1,966 

1,479 

4,182 

224 

4,621 

13,277 

13,901 

4,001 

1,828 

1,321 

13,011 

1,459 

890 

310 

2,298 

29,085 

442 

12,897 

9,113 

1,405 

34,864 



3,511,758 



175,366 



475,542 



11,534,657 
844,439 



537,651 



729,891 
183,654 



2,109,477 
202,379 



3,235,334 



557,573 

16,853 

35,102 

891 

77,229 

49,665 

102,595 

6,239 

76,317 

475,228 

455,498 

103,541 

32,534 

18,455 
82,533 
14,042 
8,381 
5,639 
37,357 

680,140 
10,557 

376,387 
98.434 
29,209 

693,259 



4,043,658 



14,024,970 
970,046 



Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic. 



12,379,096 



14,995,016 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



75 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence . . . 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts— yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other... 

Ties— yard 

Ties — other 

Rails — yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material — yard 

Other track material — other 

Ballast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing — yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences — yard 

Right-of-way fences— other 

Crossings and signs — yard 

Crossings #nd signs— other 

Station and office buildings.. 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Storage warehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Power plant buildings 

Power distribution systems 

Power line poles and fixtures 

Miscellaneous structures 

Paving 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements... 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Totals.. 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr. 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities— Cr.. 



70,143 

6,297 

72,437 

1,235 

46,035 

46,145 

306,088 

9,932 

57,552 

19,151 

37,665 

48 

835 

38,124 

241,167 

20 

382 

3,875 

12,470 

32,936 

3,353 

14,091 

6,066 

24,257 

13,913 

1,307 

12,286 

1,846 

171 

585 

827 

45 

4,884 
14,024 
4,432 
26 
3,541, 
13,611. 
2,262. 
5. 



1,121,653.98 
16,324.03 
11,994.82 



84,810.25 

7,768.37 

84,441.49 

3,914.85 

57,842.11 

67,336.08 

463,524.61 

9,634.00 

53,478.45 

32,186.24 

73,422.45 

185.80 

8,635.75 

47, 107 .05 

349,239.55 

11.75 

379 .00 

2,298.12 

24,258.94 

68,106.87 

8,412.40 

22,596.45 

10,181.57 

32,137.14 

8,659.65 

219.84 

34,969.67 

4,042.67 

336.69 

161.16 

368.95 



257.05 

9,957.69 

21,187.17 

1,870.91 

76.68 

4,454.61 

11,356.77 

2,299.78 

529 .47 



1,612,143.95 
11,695.54 
13,154.05 



Total maintenance of way and structures. 



1,610,685.44 



76 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



ime of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Power plant machinery 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation 

Steam locomotives — retirements 

Freight-train cars — repairs 

Freight-train cars— depreciation 

Freight-train cars — retirements 

Passenger-train cars — repairs 

Passenger-tr ai n c ars — depreciation 

Passenger-tr ai n cars — retirements 

Motor equipment of cars— repairs 

Motor equipment of cars — depreciation- 
Motor equipment of cars — retirements... 

Floating equipment — repairs... 

Floating equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment— depreciation 

Work equipment — retirements 

Miscellaneous equipment — repairs 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation. 
Miscellaneous equipment — retirements.. 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Ot her e xpenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Dr. 
Maintaining joint equipment at terminals— Cr.. 



Total maintenance of equipment. 

Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Industrial and immigration bureaus.. 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



90,948.33 

39,489.89 

9,306.12 

1,054,344.56 

72,032.13 

12,960.41 

442,040.47 

95,644.89 

15,025.36 

220,181.62 

19,100.95 

5,294.14 

170.36 



17,386.91 

513.28 

12,785.61 

4,052.20 

1,413.34 

1,754.78 

120 .70 

362.18 

8,253.28 

12,800.31 

3,791.59 

1,392.22 



93,668.48 

45,965.06 

11,705.82 

969,873.65 

76,480.21 

42,664.06 

501,068.38 

149,005.13 

30,157.32 

294,627.96 

26,144.37 

10,594.86 

19.63 

7.54 

21.40 

12,508.17 

1,392.69 

22,776.18 

4,400.04 

301 .35 

299 .65 

445.61 

102 .67 

9,972.01 

14,024.81 

4,687.04 

483.14 



Total traffic. 



2,136,931.71 


2,323,354.43 


3.00 


40.78 


1,476.84 


2,106.27 


2,135,457.87 


2,321,288.94 


115,605.61 


129,534.91 


150,646.47 


169,113.37 


14,353.17 


24,187.50 


3,158.25 


6,418.74 


19,228.95 


28,361.27 


162.47 


190.13 


55,115.65 


55,274.10 


72.04 


62.39 


358,321.61 


413,142.42 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



77 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Transportation— Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses— yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse e xpenses — train 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property. 

Damage to livestock on right of way 

Loss and damage — freight 

Loss and damage — baggage 

Injuries to persons 

Totals 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr 

Operating joint yards and terminals— Cr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr 

Total transportation — rail line. 



Amount of Operating 


Expenses for the Year 


1922 


1923 


$ 105,371.17 


% 134,306.47 


85,373.69 


92,672.03 


763,746.67 


746,441.72 


10,456.92 


14,949.96 


36,722.77 


38,904.70 


132,042.11 


134,121.78 


314,544.75 


358,447.49 


9,244.56 


10,025.70 


155,466.01 


180,209.26 


157,867.12 


179,166.38 


8,618.83 


8,879.15 


2,842.24 


1,059.57 


3,572.03 


5,004.48 


58,931.91 


58,640.19 


6,018.58 


8,188.68 


472,643.93 


534,935.95 


243.10 


1,045.62 


982,404.92 


1,106,968.36 


50,787.49 


54,286.14 


29,453.09 


15,382.29 


14,971.71 


18,700.43 


170,356.78 


176,955.65 


586,679.12 


675,360.64 


111,908.28 


126,265.47 


353.62 


1,069.82 


19,319.94 


21,158.84 


425.78 


384 .26 


6,918.52 


7,979.70 


70.85 


19.12 


30,160.22 


31,823.33 


4,647.14 


6,202.61 


13,175.77 


13,582.18 


20,860.37 


26,137.40 


23,921.13 


17,068.20 


15,336.27 


34,003.74 


68,342.28 


125,503.58 


816.68 


671 .08 


77,493.25 


120,225.48 


4,552,109.60 


5,086,747.45 


27,243.46 


49,669.26 


74,483.56 


49,268.57 


16,901.19 


18,220.50 


25,807.15 


28,533.96 


4,495,963.54 


5,076,834.68 



78 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Miscellaneous Operations: 


$ 101,827.80 


$ 109,625.50 




25.83 






44.69 










101,827.80 


109,696.02 






General: 


44,995.87 

287,117.69 

18,001.15 

48,963.30 

619.72 

2,363.65 

13,166.03 

19,897.58 

16,283.30 


58,122.61 




316,999.45 




19,479.91 




61,160.44 




717.38 




2,870.75 




13,659.40 




17,224.41 




10,547.02 






Totals 


451,407.99 

102.04 

.72 


500,781.37 




540.16 












451,510.75 


501,321.53 








948.21 


4,743.45 








8,668,116.55 


10,028,225.58 







Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 65.38 per cent for 1922; 66,.42 
per cent for 1923. 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



79 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 



Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




3,576.11 


3,576.11 






Train-miles: 
Freight — 
Ordinary. . . 


4,901,550 
145,895 


5,591,797 


Light 


105,978 








5,047,445 

6,464,168 

538,212 

3,646 


5,697,775 


Passenger . 


7,054,372 


Mixed 


555,311 


Special. __ 


3,875 






Total transportation service train-miles. . 


12,053,471 


13,311,333 






Work service ..... . .... 


203,155 


310,765 






Locomotive-miles: 
Freight — 
Principal 


5,047,445 
96,890 
98,064 


5,697,775 


Helper.. 


127, 628 


Light 


101,026 






Total freight locomotive-miles. 


5,242,399 


5,926,429 






Passenger — 
Principal .. . ....... 


6,397,252 
41,397 
140,726 


6,957.713 


Helper . 


59,475 


Light 


126,186 






Total passenger locomotive-miles 


6,579,375 


7,143,374 






Mixed train — 
Principal 


538,212 

130 

23,614 


555,311 


Helper... 


140 


Light 


21,870 






Total mixed train locomotive-miles 


561,956 


577,321 






Special — 
Principal 


3,646 
134 

24 


3,875 


Helper.. .. 


46 


Light 


437 






Total special locomotive-miles 


3,804 


4,358 






Train switching 


430,580 


466,361 






Yard switching — 
Freight 


1,951,329 
149,793 


2,264,439 


Passenger. 


152,232 






Total yard switching locomotive-miles 


2,101,122 


2,416,671 






Total transportation service locomotive-miles 


14,919,236 


16,534,514 






Work service 


301,013 


429,725 







80 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 



Amount, 1923 



Cah-miles: 
Freight train- 
Loaded 

Empty 



Sum of loaded and empty. 
Caboose 

Exclusive work equipment 



Total freight train car-miles. 



Passenger train — 

Passenger 

Sleeping, parlor, and observation. 

Dining 

Other 



Total passenger train car-miles. 

Mixed train — 

Freight — loaded 

Freight — empty 

Caboose 

Exclusive work equipment 

Passenger 

Sleeping, parlor, and observation... 
Other passenger-train 



Total mixed train car-miles. 



Special train — 

Freight— loaded 

Freight— empty 

Caboose 

Passenger 

Sleeping, parlor, and observation. 
Other passenger train 



Total special train car-miles 

Total transportation service car-miles. 
Work service - 



118,083,824 
52,483,704 



170,567,528 

5,135,822 

487, 123 



176,190,473 



12,093,719 

10,111,414 

1,786,259 

14,820,375 



38,811,767 



2,244,215 

1,226,809 

88 



756,173 
2,268 



4,229,553 



41,926 
3,641 
3,202 

945 
1,350 

267 



51,331 



219,283,124 



825,088 



134,368,140 
62,762,400 



197,130,540 

5,797,208 

530,155 



203,457,903 



13,147,958 

10,776,283 

1,962,110 

16,783,616 



42,669,967 



2,646,711 

1,410,886 

214 

14,856 

768,853 

126 

6,319 



4,847,965 



38,424 

1,318 

3,244 

713 

1,049 

385 



45,133 



251,020,968 



,007,280 



SEABOARD AIE LINE RAILWAY 



81 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Freight Service: 
Tons— 


12,379,096 
1,644,508 


14,995,016 




2,010,554 








14,023,604 


17,005,570 






Ton-miles — 


2,250,328,257 
285,987,743 


2,627,222,247 




349 196 753 








2,536,326,000 


2,976,419 000 






Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried — revenue ........ - - . . 


3,939,254 
256,165,272 


4,205,053 


Passenger-miles — revenue .... ._._...... ... 


292,740,830 






Revenues and Expenses: 
Freight revenue . . ...... 


$31,998,052.10 
8,936,216.53 
12,180,141.71 


$ 36,574,383.75 


Passenger revenue... _„ . .. .. . ....... . 


10,349,863 99 


Passenger service train revenue ... . . .. 


13,988,416.74 






Operating revenues. . 


45,679,048.19 
36,222,884.20 


52 249 110 36 


Operating expenses 


40,342,259.48 




Net operating revenues 


9,456,163.91 


11,906,850.88 


Averages per Mile of Road: 
Freight-train miles 


1,411 

1,808 

151 

1 

3,371 

57 

4,172 

50,253 

11,066 

$ 8,947.73 

3,405.98 

12,773.39 

10,129.13 

2,644.26 

629,270 

709,242 

71,632 


1 593 


Passenger-train miles 


1 973 


Mixed-train miles 


155 


Special-train miles. .. 


1 


Transportation service train-miles 


3 722 


Work-train miles 


87 


Locomotive-miles — transportation. . . 


4,624 


Freight service car-miles 


58,045 
12 149 


Passenger service car-miles 


Freight revenue . . 


$ 10,227.42 
3,911.63 


Passenger service train revenue- 


Operating revenues. 


14 610 60 


Operating expenses.. 


11,281.05 

3,329.55 

734 659 


Net operating revenues... 


Ton-miles — revenue freight. 


Ton-miles — all freight 


832,306 
81 860 


Passenger-miles— revenue 







Part II— 6 



82 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 



Amount, 1923 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles— mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles— mixed trains 

Train miles — special trains 

Car-miles— special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

T on-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled— revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight .*. 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent) 



23.39 

4.17 

10.40 

2.28 

412.79 

465 .25 

6.00 

1.41 

38.82 

5.87 

1.85 

3.79 

3.01 

.78 



181.79 
173 .90 
180.86 
65.03 
2 .58485 
.01422 
2 .26850 
.03488 
79.30 



23.58 

4.77 

11.02 

2.54 

428 .77 

485.76 

6.05 

1.40 

40.77 

5.97 

1.95 

3.93 

3.03 

.90 





.96 


.96 




33.61 


34.33 




.98 


.97 




5.90 


5.96 




.96 


.96 




7.53 


8.40 




.96 


.89 




13.49 


10.36 




18.70 


19.17 




21.08 


21.72 


$ 


0.26592 


$ .26694 




11.16 


11.86 


$ 


0.38919 


$ 0.41914 



175.21 
173.68 
175 .03 
69.62 
2.43910 
.01392 
2.46129 
.03536 
77.21 



SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



83 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




631 .58 


631 .58 






Train-miles: 
Freight — 


1,234,745 
27,308 


1,485,759 


Light. 


21,574 








1,262,053 

1,559,525 

82,182 

1,285 


1,507,333 




1,679,067 




91,052 




1,399 








2,905,045 


3,278,851 








59,738 


93,010 






Locomotive-miles : 

Freight — 


1,262,053 
28,470 
21,206 


1,507,333 




34,180 


Lights... _. . _ 


33,389 








1,311,729 


1,574,902 






Passenger — 


1,559,015 
9,463 
15,758 


1,679,067 




11,357 


Light 


16,006 








1,584,236 


1,706,430 






Mixed train — 
Principal.. 


82,182 
9,510 


91,052 


Light 


8,591 








91,692 


99,643 






Principal . 


1,285 

7 


1,399 




46 


Light 


267 








Total special locomotive-miles 


1,292 


1,712 






Train switching 


122,637 


130,129 







84 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 


Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Locomotive-miles— Con. 
Yard switching — 


538,819 
75,502 


617,139 




75,056 








614,321 


692 195 








3,725,907 


4,205,011 






78,708 


115 844 






Car-miles: 
Freight train — 
Loaded .. . . __ 


35,005,405 
12,980,330 


39,891,258 




16,524,435 






47,985,735 

1,302,447 

129,727 


56,415,693 




1,537,525 




160,012 








49,417,909 


58,113,230 






Passenger train — 
Passenger 


2,981,324 

2,633,296 

484,907 

4,780,571 


3,106,731 




2,630,956 




468,050 


Other 


5,228,152 








10,880,098 


11,433,889 






Mixed train- 


216,919 
57,806 


291,243 




81,907 




41 




131,359 


148,832 




126 




2,268 


6,247 








408,352 


528,396 






Special train- 


17,702 
1,434 
1,135 


15,575 








1,432 




44 




1,350 

150 


88 




22 






Total special train car-miles 


21,771 


17,161 


Total transportation service car-miles.. 


60,728,130 


70,092,676 




236,074 


290,986 







SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



85 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 Amount, 1923 



Freight Service: 

Tons— revenue freight 

Ton-miles— revenue freight. 



Passenger Service: 
Passengers carried— revenue. 
Passenger-miles— re venue 



Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue. 



Operating revenues. 
Operating expenses. 



Net operating revenues. 



Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-\r ain miles _ 

Transportation service train-miles. 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles— transportation. 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton- miles — revenue freight 

Passenger-miles — revenue 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains . 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains. 

Passenger-train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 



4,975,999 


6,232,425 


605,283,898 


698,867,747 


1,065,655 


1,109,035 


69,298,314 


77,207,057 


$ 9,848,968.74 


1 11,340,940.48 


2,417,442.22 


2,729,658.59 


3,123,171.80 


3,491,878.79 


13,258,862.37 


15,097,447.94 


8,668,116.55 


10,028,225.58 


4,590,745.82 


5,069,222.36 


1,998 


2,387 


2,469 


2,659 


130 


144 


2 


2 


4,599 


5,192 


95 


147 


5,899 


6,658 


78,712 


92,630 


17,441 


18,350 


$ 15,594.17 


$ 17,956.46 


4,945.01 


5,528.80 


20,993.16 


23,904.25 


13,724.49 


15,878.00 


7,268.67 


8,026.26 


958,365 


1,106,538 


10,972 


122,244 


27.74 


26.46 


2.64 


3.20 


10.29 


10.96 


.70 


.90 


459 .47 


444 .68 


6.98 


6.81 


1.63 


1.70 


43.68 


45.26 


$ 7.48 


% 7.22 


1.97 


2.05 


4.56 


4.60 


2.98 


3.06 


1.58 


1.55 



86 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Averages per Locomotive-mile: 


.96 

37.67 

.98 

6.87 

.90 

4.45 

.99 

16.85 




.96 




36.90 




.98 




6.70 




.91 


Car- miles — mixed trains 


5.30 


Train-miles — special trains 


.82 




10.02 






Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 


S 


17.18 
0.27962 


$ 


17.39 




.28224 






Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 


$ 


12.06 
.42072 


$ 


13.12 




.46370 






Miscellaneous Averages: 


$ 


121.64 
65.03 

1 .97929 
.01627 

2 .26850 
.03488 
65.38 


$ 


112.13 




69.62 




1.81967 




.01623 




2 .46129 




.03536 




66.42 







SEABOAKD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



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90 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TAXES 





Name of State 


Amount Charged to "Railway- 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 149,366.25 
603,761.33 
301,631.23 
345,556.28 
86,436.44 
632,287.29 


$ 161,757.61 


North Carolina 


596,888.76 




319,635.10 


Georgia 


358,682.83 




80,563.43 




680,905.88 








Totals 


2,119,038.82 


2,198,433.61 







UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TAXES 





$ 5,196.50 


$ 4,492.50 




1,128.17 










5,196.50 


5,620.67 






Grand totals 


2,124,235.32 


2,204,054.28 







SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY 



91 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 



Class of Employees 



1922 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



1923 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 

Executives, general officers, and assistants 

Division officers, assistants, and staff assistants... 

Totals 



Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 
ants (A) 

Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 
ants (B) 

Subprofessional engineering and laboratory as- 
sistants 

Professional and subprofessional legal assistants.. 
Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments).. 
Chief clerks (minor departments) and assistant 

chief clerks and supervising cashiers 

Clerks and clerical specialists (A) 

Clerks (B) 

Clerks (C) 

Mechanical device operators (office) 

Stenographers and secretaries (A) 

Stenographers and typists (B) 

Storekeepers, sales agents, and buyers 

Ticket agents and assistant ticket agents 

Traveling auditors or accountants 

Telephone switchboard operators and office as- 
sistants 

Messengers and office boys 

Elevator operators and other office attendants 

Lieutenants and sergeants of police 

Patrolmen 

Watchmen (without police authority) 

Supervising traffic agents 

Traffic agents, advertising and development agents 
Fire prevention, smoke, and time-service in- 
spectors, and office building superintendents 

Claim agents and claim investigators 

Real estate and tax agents and investigators 

Examiners, instructors, and special investigators- 
Miscellaneous trades workers (other than plumbers) 

Motor vehicle and motor car operators 

Teamsters and stablemen 

Janitors and cleaners 



Totals- 
Daily basis... 
Hourly basis. 



93 
115 



$ 607,106 
383,987 



208 



51 

126 

176 

1,006 

92 

58 

58 

244 

20 

26 

18 

18 
67 
30 
2 
89 
104 
33 
87 

2 
24 



451 
1,993 



991,093 



13,119 

40,234 

19,746 
27,756 
151,051 

278,276 

382,330 

,555,512 

112,549 

82,089 

105,623 

348,709 

52,621 

52,977 

49,467 

13,606 

44,278 

25,169 

3,850 

144,509 

183,927 

105,831 

212,571 

3,460 

69,595 

35 

100 

6,595 

28,206 

1,723 

13,113 



1,019,369 
3,109,259 



97 
124 



667,447 
421,416 



221 



59 

140 

203 

994 

111 

91 

72 

251 

27 

24 

19 

23 
73 
39 
2 
54 
52 
35 
93 

3 
24 



495 
2,018 



18,128 

41,215 

22,606 
28,008 
170,737 

306,022 

405,054 

1,532,374 

126,943 

117,699 

132, 740 

356,797 

65,628 

50,282 

53,884 

17,367 
40,747 
27, 652 
5,007 
95,331 
70,228 
109,450 
228,662 

6,749 

69,814 

530 



6,110 
27,736 

1,767 
14,026 



1,101,559 
3,047,734 



92 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION-Continued 



Class of Employees 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Roadmasters and general foremen 

Assistant general foremen 

Maintenance of way inspectors 

Bridge and building gang foremen 

Bridge and building carpenters. 

Bridge and building ironworkers 

Bridge and building painters 

Masons, bricklayers, plasterers, and plumbers 

Skilled trades helpers 

Regular apprentices 

Portable steam equipment operators 

Portable steam equipment operator helpers 

Pumping equipment operators 

Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers) 
Gang foremen (bridge and building, signal and 

telegraph laborers) 

Gang or section foremen... 

Laborers (extra gang and work-train).. 

Track and roadway section laborers. 

Maintenance of way laborers (other than track 

and roadway) and gardeners and farmers 

General foremen and supervising inspectors (sig- 
nal, telegraph, and electrical transmission) 

Assistant general foremen (signal, telegraph, and 
electrical transmission) and signal and tele- 
graph inspect ors-. 

Gang foremen (signal and telegraph skilled trades 

labor) 

Signalmen and signal maintainers 

Signalman and signal maintainer helpers 



Totals- 
Daily basis... 
Hourly basis. 



1922 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



39 



50 

101 

6 

6 

2 

144 

23 

10 

7 

110 

13 

13 
483 
156 
,038 

127 

1 



40 
3,306 



Compen- 
sation 



$ 119,684 

6,366 

11,476 

83,546 

107,492 

7,432 

7,718 

3,805 

115,374 

15,373 

21,266 

5,073 

68,307 

21,266 

22,604 

692,636 

94,762 

1,011,593 

91,591 

2,760 

1,618 



16,175 



124,062 
2,403,795 



1923 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



39 
3 
4 

42 
121 



332 

2,452 



120 



50 

3,972 



Compen- 
sation 



$ 122,748 

6,408 

11,782 

75,445 

131,621 

10,025 

' 10,026 

3,805 

149,151 

7,648 

26,573 

6,198 

75,742 

37,128 

49,882 

700,669 

225,974 

1,338,458 

76,155 

2,760 



20,647 

401 
3,026 

44 



146,155 
2,946,161 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



93 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Fairfax Harrison 

L. E. Jeffries 

H. W. Miller 

E. H. Shaw 


Washington, D.-C. 


Vice President and General Counsel 

Vice President 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 




F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 










R. B. Pegram 

C. E. A. McCarthy 

E. F. Parham 

E. F. Kemper _ 






New York, N. Y. 

















DIRECTORS 

Guy Cary, New York, N. Y. ; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. G. ; H. W. Miller, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Adrian Iselin. New York, N. Y. ; Charles Lanier, New York, N. Y. ; J. Kerr 
Branch, Richmond, Va. ; Robert Jamison, Birmingham, Ala. ; Geo. T. Slade, New York, 
N. Y. ; Devereux Milburn, New York, N. Y. ; Casper G. Bacon, Boston, Mass. ; Jonathan 
Bryan, New York, N. Y. ; Jeremiah Milbank, New York, N. Y. 



HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report, Southern Railway Company. 

2. Date of organization, June 18, 1894. 

3. Under laws of what State organized? Organized under and by virtue of an act of the 
General Assembly of the State of Virginia, approved February 20, 1894. 

4. If a consolidated or a merging company, name all constituent and all merged com- 
panies : Not a consolidated company except as noted below respecting the Virginia Midland 
and Knoxville, Cumberland Gap and Louisville Railway, and Carolina and Cumberland Gap 
Railway Companies. 

The Southern Railway Company was organized by the purchasers of the property formerly 
of the Richmond and Danville Railroad Company. Under its charter it has power to acquire 
various other railroad properties, and on various dates since its organization it has pur- 
chased, in addition to the Richmond and Danville Railroad proper, under foreclosure sale 
or otherwise, and now owns the following properties : 

Piedmont R. R., Western North Carolina R. R., Northwestern North Carolina R. R., 
Atlantic, Tennessee and Ohio R. R., Oxford and Clarksville R. R., Oxford and Henderson 
R. R., Clarksville and North Carolina R. R., Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta R. R., 
Columbia and Greenville R. R., that part of the Georgia Pacific Ry. which lies in the States 
of Georgia and Alabama, East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Ry., Atlanta and Florida 
Ry., that part of the Memphis and Charleston R. R. which lies in the States of Tennessee 
and Alabama, Northeastern R. R. of Georgia, Knoxville Belt R. R., Southern Railway Com- 
pany in Illinois, and certain subordinate lines of some of the above named companies. 

It has also acquired by consolidation the property and franchises of the following com- 
panies : The Virginia Midland Ry., acquired by deed dated June 21, 1898 ; the Knoxville, 
Cumberland Gap and Louisville Ry., acquired by deed dated June 29, 1898 ; the Carolina and 
Cumberland Gap Ry., acquired by deed dated September 1, 1898 ; the Knoxville and Ohio 
R. R., acquired by deed dated December 31, 1903 ; the Knoxville and Bristol Ry., acquired 
by deed dated December 31, 1903. 

It also holds under lease the property of the following named companies : Georgia Mid- 
land Ry., Atlanta and Charlotte Ry. Co., North Carolina R. R. Co., Southern Railway — Caro- 
lina Division, Mobile and Birmingham R. R. Co., Richmond and Mecklenburg R. R. Co., 
Atlantic and Danville Ry. Co., Lockhart R. R. Co. 

5. Date and authority for each consolidation and for each merger: See pages 28 and 29 
of the First Consolidated Mortgage Deed, dated October 4, 1894, and filed with the report 
of this company for the year ending June 30, 1895, for date and authority for each of the 



94 N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 

above mentioned purchases, except the Atlantic and Florida Railway, which was purchased 
by deed dated June 21, 1895 ; the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, which was acquired by 
deed dated February 26, 1898 ; the Georgia Midland Ry., which was leased by an instrument 
dated June 18, 1896 ; the Virginia Midland Ry., deeded June 21, 1898 ; the Knoxville, Cumber- 
land Gap and Louisville Ry., deeded June 29, 1898 ; the Carolina and Cumberland Gap Ry., 
deeded September 1, 1898 ; the Knoxville Belt R. R., acquired by deed dated January 13, 
1899 ; Northeastern Railroad of Georgia, at sale October 31, 1899. 

6. If a reorganized company, give name of original corporation, refer to laws under 
which it was organized and state the occasion for the reorganization. The Southern Rail- 
way Company was organized under a plan for the reorganization of the Richmond and West 
Point Terminal Railway and Warehouse Company, a corporation organized and formerly 
existing under an act of Assembly of the State of Virginia dated March 8, 1880 (Acts of 
Assembly of Virginia, 1879-1880, chapter 238, p. 231), as amended by an act approved 
February 21, 1882 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1881-1882, chapter 149, p. 151) ; an act 
approved March 2, 1882 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1881-1882, chapter 192, p. 201) ; 
an act approved March 23, 1887 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1887, chapter 3, p. 1), and 
the subsidiary lines of said Richmond and West Point Terminal Railway and Warehouse 
Co., of which the principals were the Richmond and Danville Railroad Co., organized under 
an act of Assembly of Virginia, passed March 9, 1847 (Acts of Assembly of Virginia, 1846- 
1847, p. 108), as amended by various subsequent acts, and the East Tennessee, Virginia and 
Georgia Ry. Co., which was a corporation organized in January, 1887, under the act of 
Tennessee passed March 12, 1877 (Actsi of Tennessee, 1877, chapter 12, p. 17), by the pur- 
chase at foreclosure sale of the property formerly of the East Tennessee, Virginia and 
Georgia Ry. Co., which corporation was a company formed by consolidation in 1871 of the 
East Tennessee and Georgia R. R. Co., originally known as the Hiwassee R. R. Co., and 
incorporated under an act of Tennessee in 1836 (Local Laws of Tennessee, 1835-1836, chapter 
3, p. 23), and the East Tennessee and Virginia R. R. Co., which was organized under an 
act of Tennessee passed January 27, 1848 (Acts of Tennessee, 1847-1848, chapter 120, p. 195). 

The necessity for the reorganization of the properties here mentioned arose by reason of 
their inability to meet all of their financial obligations. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



95 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$422,139,757.54 


Investments: 


$428,084,147.92 

16,846,942.26 

456,650.00 

1,005,461.82 

35,224,658.76 

25,936,072.69 

4,448,896.53 

4,119,201.08 

93,908.00 

2,643,913.45 

193,836.02 

5,921,846.50 


$ 442,552,668.73 


16,577,441.14 

6,800.00 

989,206.59 


Improvements on leased railway property 

Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 


17,482,257.44 

684,147.31 

1,010,020.05 


35,224,658.76 


Investments in affiliated companies — 


35,147,261.75 


26,307,912.28 


Bonds 


24,935,973.19 


4,535,655.53 


Notes . _ 


4,625,116.77 


3,873,143.96 




2,731,681.16 


94,008.00 


Other investments — 
Stocks 


93,808.00 


2,659,563.45 


Bonds 


2,429,003.21 


421,460.24 


Notes 


15,643,752.18 










Total investments 




512,829,607.49 


524,975,535.03 


547,335,689.79 




Current Assets: 
Cash 




8,097,605.58 


14,158,943.26 


9,975,262.26 






2,100,000.00 


8,650,700.50 




3,060,448.80 

29,152.61 

1,578,482.03 

155,170.36 

8,477,471.26 

12,374,602.93 

1,052,518.06 

438,664.63 


2,999,975.40 


867,662.92 




10,985,702.30 


2,720,022.19 

312,615.45 

7,006,758.98 


Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 


1,765,847.49 

92,329.69 

6,375,645.69 


13,473,154.76 


Material and supplies 


17,194,734.59 


1,277,280.99 




681,640.35 


539,876.22 


Other current assets 


256,119.08 




Total current assets 




42,945,677.59 


41,325,453.94 


52,427,256.85 




Deferred Assets: 
Working fund advances 




48,836.78 


51,993.78 

1,279,450.32 

74,065.40 


72,402.43 


1,246,037.33 


Insurance and other funds 


1,300,658.76 


86,383.33 


Other deferred assets 


172,823.67 




Total deferred assets.. 




1,381,257.44 


1,405,509.50 


1,545,884.86 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance- 




18,228.58 


9,821.54 

253,715.62 

4,361,829.91 


4,836.52 


3,329,108.22 


Other unadjusted debits 


4,015,467.86 




Total unadjusted debits... 




3,347,336.80 


4,625,367.07 


4,020,304.38 




Grand totals 




506,503,879.32 


572,331,565.54 


605,329,135.88 







96 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— 


Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$185,650,200.00 


Stock: 


$185,650,200.00 


$ 185,650,200.00 




Governmental Grants: 




84,078.58 


214,550.34 


214,150.34 




Long-term Debt: 




253,092,300.00 


261,630,100.00 


285,262,900.00 




Current Liabilities: 




5,954,270.00 
2,023,634.11 








2,137,152.80 

14,956,767.56 

1,945,733.42 

2,816,452.50 

6,192.50 

62,833.80 

56,502.00 

1,907,621.49 

323,947.33 

1,348,646.36 


1,850,846.77 


14,592,011.25 




15,996,797.22 


2,399,027.75 
2 925,320.70 


Miscellaneous accounts payable 


1,915,220.49 
2,794,118.60 


820 .00 




1,625.00 


32,589.80 




29,581.80 


56,502.00 




56,502.00 


1,824,735.32 




2,249,561.40 


320,804.96 




311,153.49 


1,089,735.58 




1,470,943.78 






31 219,451.47 


25,561,849.76 


26,676,350.55 




Deferred Liabilities: 




203,985.84 


226,292.57 


402,541.64 




Unadjusted Credits: 
Tax liability .' - 




1,251,395.94 


1,899,764.30 

1,279,450.32 

1,339,825.61 

25,325,088.81 

144,144.73 
7,128,120.80 


2,465,064.11 


1,246,037.33 
1 304,255.11 




1,300,658.76 




1,199,542.16 


24 674,114.84 




24,733,867.21 


131,268.41 


Accrued depreciation — miscellaneous physical 


129,776.08 


4 429 663 .00 




6,740,516.86 








33,036,734.63 


37,116,394.57 


36,569,425.18 


Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and surplus 
Appropriated surplus not specifically invested 

Total appropriated surplus 




1,754,740.19 
21,593.18 


1,809,532.42 
21,593.15 


2,619,084.99 
421,210.81 


1,776,333.37 
55,440,795.43 


1,831,125.60 
60,061,352 ;70 


3,040,295.80 
67,513,272.37 




Total corporate surplus 




57,217,128.80 


61,892,478.30 


70,553,568.17 


560,503,879.32 


572,331,865.54 


605,329,135.88 







SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



97 



ROAD OPERATED 



Name of Road or Track 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 
Second 
Main 
Track 


Miles of 

Industrial 

Tracks 


Miles of 

Yard 

Track and 

Sidings, 

etc. 


Total 




2,835.70 
1,387.74 
102 .80 
524 .84 
782 .92 
817.12 
518.21 


382 .53 
12.47 


327 .91 
186 .03 
14.51 
44.19 
109.71 
65.06 
.24 


1,028.83 
351 .60 

16.56 
114.02 
320 .50 
187 .70 

12.44 


4,574.97 




1,937.84 




133 .87 




2.83 
349 .34 

8.69 


685 .88 


Leased — nonaffiliated companies 


1,562.47 
1,078.57 




530 .89 








Totals 


6,971.08 


755 .86 


747 .65 


2,031.65 


10,506.24 







Part H— 7 



98 



N". C CORPORATION COMMISSION 











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SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 






Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Freight - 


$88,091,271.82 

30,264,513.62 

241,011.96 

18,398.22 

2,895,131.29 

2,123,943.67 

474,099.89 

277,764.02 

1,061,132.97 

116,478.11 

199,845.20 

.90 

2.52 

5,003.89 


$105,439,499.17 




33,756,011.37 




254,448.43 




13,950.47 


Mail 


2,985,727.24 




2,652,890.25 




574,023.61 


Milk 


269,483.16 


Switching- 


1,261,853.41 




102,369.16 




6,229.90 








.36 


Water transfers — other . 


4,779.59 






Total rail-line transportation revenue . 


125,768,598.08 


147,321,266.12 








951,977.12 
59,490.34 
93,925.33 
28,718.30 

149,413.36 
11,786.35 

381,256.57 

409 .96 

15,133.63 

94,242.95 

184,383.30 


1,004,061.94 




63,258.88 




100,736.28 


Parcel room . 


31,112.17 




157,877.10 


Storage — baggage . ... 


13,585.39 


Demurrage . .. . 


671,807.94 






Power ._ . 


15,349.52 


Rents of buildings and other property... .. ... . ... 


104,018.65 


Miscellaneous.. 


225,281.88 






Total incidental operating revenues. 


1,970,737.25 


2,387,089.75 


Joint facility — Cr . 


734,344.15 
16,167.59 


76,194.68 




565 .32 






Total joint facility operating revenue 


750,511.78 


759,629.36 






Total railway operating revenues 


128,489,847.11 


150,467,985.23 







100 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 


EARNED WITHIN THE STATE 




Class of Railway Operating 
Revenues 


1922 


1923 


On Intrastate 
Traffic 


On Interstate 
Traffic 


On Intrastate 
Traffic 


On Interstate 
Traffic 




$ 3,627,374.21 

3,918,839.52 

Unseparated 

50,311.80 

6,319.92 

593,589.68 

453,209.23 

90,832.97 

5,002.66 

115,834.91 

23,794.29 

20.51 

292 .98 


$16,435,301.82 
2,521,454.86 


$ 3,630,356.66 

3,526,220.14 

Unsepara'.ed 

56,397.39 

3,184.73 

564,448.33 

598,939.68 

116,031.12 

4,686.63 

143,538.17 

20,783.61 

31.04 


$ 19,585,991.48 




4,155,647.65 












Mail 


















Milk . 






































Total rail-line transportation 


27,842,179.36 




32,406,256.63 












240,870.90 




245,758.83 
14,343.61 
28,497.89 
14,675.70 
48,908.79 
6,142.33 

183,441.31 












27,906.92 
13,327.57 
35,990.55 
5,578.38 
99,626.93 
88.70 








































3,071.15 

18,005.49 
41,726.89 




Rents of buildings and other prop- 


16,256.72 
14,455.08 


















Total incidental operating 


454,101.75 




604,571.99 












2, 644 .35 

8,884.27 




27,647.35 
4,593.52 
















Total joint facility operating 


11,528.62 




32,240.87 










Total railway operating rev- 


28,307,809.73 




33,043,069.49 











SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



101 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structuhes: 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Tunnels and subways 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts— yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other 

Ties — yard 

Ties — other 

Rails— yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material— yard 

Other track material — other 

Ballast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing — yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences — yard 

Right-of-way fences — other 

Crossings and signs — yard 

Crossings and signs — other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Wharves and docks 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlocked... 

Power plant buildings 

Power line poles and fixtures 

Miscellaneous structures 

Paving 

Roadway machines. 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand.. 

Assessments for public improvements 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance.. 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Totals 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Cr. 
Equalization — way and structures 

Total maintenance of way and structures... 



$ 1,360,424.18 


$ 1,480,727.93 


124,623.35 


140,919.25 


1,965,733.91 


2,263,024.57 


5,937.51 


14,347.88 


29,762.34 


52,563.19 


1,313,238.63 


1,200,430.97 


398,653.91 


487,404.03 


3,283,577.66 


4,223,000.19 


38,792.58 


3,090.77 


578,450.55 


847,563.37 


136,771.33 


150,578.14 


417,358.15 


420,770.43 


4,352.71 


5,489.90 


553,529.93 


877,221.81 


439,758.88 


478,202.92 


3,738,474.55 


4,181,531.56 


86.26 


675 .22 


41,342.71 


43,674.41 


29,122.52 


28,303.67 


222,424.85 


303,409.46 


671,717.34 


912,084.33 


150,394.22 


200,817.04 


164,818.16 


241,114.89 


139,351.52 


174,242.21 


188,178.92 


378,621.55 


60,674.85 


87,447.27 


106,993.10 


126,485.92 


218,494.44 


271,344.70 


966.07 


333 .39 


636.78 


131.91 


255 .84 




187 .82 


2,146.09 


58,295.02 


97,012.20 


156,931.98 


206,978.23 


59,931.20 


38,274.25 


126.31 


1,401.28 


73,991.15 


111,465.16 


123,403.44 


130,502.36 


27,019.56 


24,883.52 


2,506.19 


3,161.22 


16,887,290.47 


20,205,195.65 


798,736.51 


959,009.63 


386,851.96 


483,879.73 


3,658.49 








17,295,516.53 


20,680,325.55 



102 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Power plant machinery 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation 

Steam locomotives — retirements 

Freight-train cars— repairs 

Freight-train cars — depreciation 

Freight-train cars — retirements 

Passenger-train cars — repairs 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation 

Passenger-train cars — retirements 

Floating equipment— repairs 

Floating equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — repairs 

Work equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — retirements . 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation. 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses... 



Totals 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals- 
Maintaining joint equipment at terminals- 
Total maintenance of equipment 



-Dr. 
-Cr.. 



Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies 

Advertising 

Traffic associations 

Fast freight lines 

Industrial and immigration bureaus. 

Insurance . 

Stationery and printing _. 

Other expenses 



591 

197. 

11 

9,033 

703 

98 

6,709 

1,419 

298 

1,463 

140 

6 

29 

3 

158 

51 

8 

4 

57 
112 
21 



,903.43 
, 686 .95 
,366.92 
,320.59 
,866.41 
,837.30 
,985.72 
,288.56 
,678.32 
,539.74 
,027.68 
,996.56 
,013.78 
,730.44 
,234.74 
,470.26 
,237.77 
,013.93 
,917.47 
,031.30 
,417.26 
,917.71 



21,621,482.84 

317,544.00 

11,476.70 



21,927,548.14 



847,806.99 

1,002,298.83 

170,970.44 

74,102.48 



58,528.19 

555.52 

325,343.80 

322.72 



$ 650,479.07 

368,926.34 

11,671.18 

12,278,694.33 

649,099.39 

90,070.21 

9,922,814.61 

1,598,186.28 

847,528.51 

1,803,423.71 

171,479.66 

36,852.39 

16,287.27 

4, 179 .23 

179,414.18 

47,933.62 

15,728.23 

249 .28 

105,972.41 

128,741.07 

21,210.77 

15,156.00 



20,964,097.74 

299,134.66 

12,032.97 



29,251,199.43 



940,032.29 
,134,013.07 

347,223.79 
82,892.58 
65,056.97 



650.96 
338,168.48 

388 .77 



Total traffic. 



2,479,929.27 



2,908,426.91 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



103 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES-ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Transportation— Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station empl oyees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — yard 

Yard supplies and expenses... 

Train enginemen 

Train m o tor men 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — train 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection. 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to livestock on right of way 

Loss and damage — freight 

Loss and damage — baggage 

Injuries to persons 

Totals... 

Operating joint yards and terminals— Dr 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr 

Total transportation — rail line 



$ 1,437,871.52 


$ 1,613,924.75 


1,019,070.61 


1,082,469.81 


7,759,745.72 


8,034,457.57 


207,163.50 


207, 33 r > .35 


357,990.87 


399,313.39 


1,165,993.22 


1,250,777.84 


2,495,632.28 


2,926,001.00 


62,889.27 


61,228.81 


1,417,940.95 


1,732,934.88 


1,351,962.98 


1,545,821.59 


81,895.05 


93,157.16 


21,858.04 


22,068.49 


33,553.08 


40,275.05 


845,954.43 


816,439.23 


51,576.97 


53.886.32 


5,204,534.76 


5,670,607.61 


4,236.01 


3,189.30 


9,668,245.71 


10,549,797.44 


527,753.09 


608,020.36 


232,093.24 


174,575.96 


202,576.69 


230,627.54 


2,421,577.26 


2,428,848.19 


6,180,588.85 


6,696,753.67 


1,511,809.61 


1,621,587.92 


73,319.27 


74,155.55 


227,579.68 


227,438.71 


16,183.96 


14,300.22 


174,698.59 


217,105.46 


50,970.45 


54,865.17 


315,792.02 


329,047.00 


460,034.30 


65,704.00 


109,798.83 


199,463.52 


155,585.64 


180,328.13 


216,697.76 


198,773.99 


143,172.43 


127,704.19 


1,160,963.95 


920,512.20 


13,575.16 


14,760.28 


758,729.35 


1,013,947.75 


48,141,615.10 


51,502,215.40 


2,901,703.93 


3,404,599.37 


377,800.76 


393,580.68 


227,593.88 


261,336.19 


139,098.65 


124,911.09 


50,754,013.50 


54,649,659.19 



104 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 


—Continued 




Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Miscellaneous Operations: 


$ 848,536.88 
50,267.44 
11,993.22 
44,124.52 


$ 925,673.23 




55,871.39 




12,917.18 




58,171.71 








954,922.06 


1,052,633.51 






General: 


244,593.55 

2,370,493.88 

140,521.31 

595,475.24 

3,306.61 

39,877.41 

122,213.69 

115,557.30 

70,170.64 


386,803.63 




2,303,242.00 




146,130.42 




673,616.33 




2,786.13 




30,740.72 




108,978.76 




125,895.66 




61,080.51 






Totals . 


3,702,209.63 

58,797.03 

600 .00 


3,839,274.16 




55,099.16 




600 .00 








3,760,406.66 


3,893,773.32 








2,203.02 


21,759.24 








97,170,133.14 


112,414,258.67 







Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 75.62 per cent for 1922; 74.21 
per cent for 1923. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



105 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Tunnels and subways 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other... 

Ties — yard 

Ties — other 

Rails— yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material — yard 

Other track material — other.. 

Ballast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing — yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences— yard 

Right-of-way fences — other 

Crossings and signs— yard 

Crossings and signs — other 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Power line, poles and fixtures 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements.. 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing.. 

Other expenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr.. 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Cr.. 
Equalization — way and structures 



254,354.08 
20,687.49 

439,105.94 
1,998.20 
2,670.08 

180,571.56 
78,106.36 

602,377.16 
10,914.02 

119,212.71 

28,898.69 

74,587.07 

1,264.35 

134,927.54 
93,530.01 

645,943.99 



180.22 
6,141.26 
52,732.95 
183,098.69 
25,022.43 
33,744.78 
14,920.52 
41,581.96 
16,356.14 
51,498.58 



12,130.57 
29,684.02 
15,286.45 
40.20 
29,333.82 
16,995.30 
5,118.62 
223 .85 



3,223,239.61 

76,795.76 

16,044.51 

926.37 



276,015.97 

20,461.68 

459,042.42 

10,415.95 

9,002.46 

169,231.91 

99,988.54 

857,806.47 

1,217.10 

294,022.95 

29,283.34 

119,383.69 

511.76 

200,783.35 

104,048.26 

879,131.27 

53.82 

1,801.00 

4,973.87 

78,240.86 

203,967.22 

40,251.38 

43,978.16 

24,595.81 

78,719.98 

32,649.03 

72,186.52 

19.98 

24,215.08 

46,030.20 

9,667.88 

56.59 

27,439.05 

16,455.69 

5,539.88 

405 .05 



4,235,557.17 
141,749.27 
10,849.78 



Total maintenance of way and structures. 



3,283,064.49 



4,366,456. 



106 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Shop machinery 

Power plant machinery 

Steam locomotives — repairs 

Steam locomotives — depreciation 

Steam locomotives — retirements 

Freight-train cars— repairs 

Freight-train cars — depreciation 

Freight-train cars — retirements 

Passenger- train cars — repairs 

Passenger-train cars — depreciation 

Passenger-train cars — retirements 

Work equipment— repairs 

Work equipment — depreciation 

Work equipment — retirements 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation. 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing _. 

Other expenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Dr. 
Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Cr.. 



Total maintenance of equipment. 

Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Outside agencies . 

Advertising. 

Traffic associations 

Industrial and immigration bureaus.. 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



896 .83 
422 .02 
155 .90 
208 .70 
460 .89 
065 .97 
860.51 
010.47 
479 .68 
475.36 
389 .69 
283 .24 
852 .58 
253 .49 
131.04 
702 .20 
058.61 
094.79 



21, 

22, 

4,493.06 

166,195.63 



4,599,490.16 
1,080.68 



4,598,409.48 



179,244.41 

212,073.33 

35,475.21 

15,732.92 

12,613.40 

100 .96 

67,684.60 

67.14 



131,111.77 

74,175.16 

2,342.04 

2,698,043.09 

143,517.11 

19,727.68 

2,449,826.56 

389,603.70 

196,971.11 

372,795.46 

35,269.02 

7,705.18 

41,830.82 

9,961.80 

3,125.00 

91.80 

21,699.01 

25,223.06 

4,361.13 

3,235.12 



,630,615.62 

28,680.24 

841.18 



6,658,388.25 



209,268.39 

247,516.06 

77,821.27 

18,415.44 

14,521.23 

122.69 

74,893.08 

297.67 



Total traffic. 



522,991.97 



642,855.83 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



107 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 






T/KANSPORTATION — RAIL LlNE: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus. 

Coal and ore wharves. 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — train 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses. 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 

Damage to livestock on right of way 

Loss and damage — freight 

Loss and damage — baggage. 

Injuries to persons 



Totals 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr.. 

Total transportation — rail line 



274,401.15 

210,191.43 

1,935,386.37 

39,031.66 



99, 

274, 



351, 

324, 

15, 

5, 

9, 

193, 

10, 

1,084, 

2,056, 

91, 



385, 
1,242, 

237. 
19, 
61. 
31, 
67, 

145, 
18, 
38, 
37, 
7, 

293, 
3, 

193. 



945.81 
479.21 
835.31 
101 .25 
149 .95 
226.87 
568 .30 

290 .88 
668.62 
880 .69 
667 .55 
882 .59 
732.62 
935 .42 
141 .55 
425 .82 
127.61 
405 .54 
786.15 
151 .08 
335 .08 

797 .89 
798 .75 
256.14 
647.13 
277.48 
470 .96 
693 .50 
227 .44 
407 .45 
369 .20 



327, 

214 

2,059 

38 

110 

287 

790 

9 

419 

383 

20 

4 

11 

215 

9 

1,261 

2,442 

115 

38 

48 

475 

1,431 

345 

22 

62 

36 

74 

11 

44 

51 

59 

7 

196 

3 

207 



,394.61 
,993.14 
,139.62 
,611.30 
4.70 
,147.80 
,540.96 
,512.55 
,416.04 
,567.81 
,583.35 
,035.83 
,723.14 
,447.21 
,830.66 
, 660 .20 
,006.62 
,447.42 
,975.43 
,099.59 
,873.92 
,984.63 
,681.46 
,985.13 
,513.94 
,594.37 
,261.05 
,767.65 
,070.27 
,834.95 
,879.26 
,871.43 
,539.25 
,373.85 
,567.52 
, 778 .93 



10,534,700.45 


11,841,715.59 


50,290.69 


272,300.52 


131,572.67 


139,930.79 


40,920.83 


43,741.44 


191.68 


3,926.63 


10,494,147.62 


12,013,900.13 



108 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 




Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Miscellaneous Operations: 


$ 214,402.66 


$ 237,134.86 




11,222.55 






2,613.08 






11,517.53 










214,402.66 


262,488.02 






General: 


48,237.36 

455,587.69 

27,612.48 

122,202.15 

667.09 

7,894.13 

24,351.07 

22,639.77 

13,813.73 


77,923.58 




475,709.16 




29,794.17 




137,156.93 




558 .97 




6,218.09 




22,564.20 




25,485.54 




13,106.35 






Totals 


723,005.47 
2,161.61 


788,516.99 




6,599.29 




88.64 










725,167.08 


745,027.64 








467 .79 


4,455.92 








19,837,715.51 


24,734,660.61 







Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 70.08 per cent. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



109 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 




Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 




6,971.08 


6,971 08 






Tkain-miles: 
Freight- 


14,900,300 
286,852 


17,917,792 


Light . ... . ... 


245,630 








15,187,182 


18,163,422 








15,215,550 

520,502 

34,173 


15,682,389 




515,466 
37,481 










30,957,407 


34,398,758 






954,454 


1 394 636 






Locomotive-miles : 
Freight- 
Principal ... ......... ... 


15,187,182 
366,046 
416,417 


18,163,422 


Helper . . ... ... . ... ... 


552,560 
438,305 


Light 




Total freight locomotive-miles 


15,969,645 


19,154,287 






Passenger — 
Principal .. ... _ . _ 


15,183,260 

84,581 

362,855 


15,655,667 
110,543 
375,442 


Helper. .. .... .... .... . . 


Light 




Total passenger locomotive-miles ._ 


15,630,696 


16 141 652 






Mixed train- 
Principal 


520,502 

212 

7,618 


515 466 


Helper . . ... ... ... . 




Light 


9,011 




Total mixed train locomotive-miles . 


528,332 


524 477 






Special — 
Principal . ... . ._ ._ 


34,173 

1,745 

799 


37,481 
1 681 


Helper ... . .... 


Light 


565 






Total special locomotive-miles _ ... 


36,717 


39,727 




Train switching _ ._ _ 


1,101,134 


1,413,849 




Yard switching — 
Freight . .. ... 


5,870,149 
498,010 


7,118,553 
541 737 


Passenger .. . .. ... 






Total yard switching locomotive-miles. . 


6,368,159 


7,660,290 




Total transportation service locomotive-miles 


39,634,683 


44,934,282 




Work service 


954,454 


1,394,636 





110 



N. C CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 


Car-miles: 
Freight train — 


337,224,285 
139,784,636 


410,094,706 




181,255,919 






Sum of loaded and empty 


477,008,921 
15,191,563 
2,764,643 


591,350,625 
18,165,777 




2,806,683 








494,965,127 


612,323,085 






Passenger train — 


36,254,902 
22,661,878 
3,511,384 
24,677,077 


38,070,052 




26,213,465 




3,650,230 


Other. 


26,770,082 








57,105,241 


94,708,829 






Mixed train — 


2,429,272 

920,972 

71,816 

1,027,674 

310 

9 

35,831 


2,649,770 




1,022,969 




29,786 




988,463 




416 




20 




52,499 








4,485,884 


4,743,923 






Special train — 


345,087 


293,010 


Freight — empty 


113 


Caboose . 


31,467 

99,073 

21,109 

280 

8,813 


27,542 




84,262 




19,776 


Dining 


445 


Other passenger-train 


15,449 








505,829 ' 


440,597 






Total transportation service car-miles 


587,062,081 


712,211,434 






Work service ■. 


1,315,543 


1,365,482 







SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



111 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Item 


Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 


Freight Service: 
Tons— 


35,498,269 
5,717,575 


45,573,936 




7,558,886 








41,215,844 


53,132,822 






Ton-miles — 


6,512,961,271 

979,177,529 


8,123,383,945 




1,514,648,655 








7,492,138,800 


9,638,032,600 






Passenger Service: 


14,653,689 
877,545,973 


14,837,988 


Passenger-miles — revenue 


978,088,285 






Revenues and Expenses: 
Freight revenue 


$88,091,271.82 
30,264,513.62 
36,294,862.67 


$105,439,499.17 


Passenger revenue 


33,756,011.37 


Passenger service train revenue . 


40,506,534.53 






Operating revenues 


$128,489,847.11 
97,170,133.14 


$150,467,985.23 


Operating expenses 


112,414,258.67 






Net operating revenues 


31,319,713.97 


38,053,726.56 






Averages per Mile of Road: 
Freight-train miles... . _ 


2,179 

2,183 

75 

5 

4,441 

137 

5,686 

71,548 

12,666 

$ 12,636.67 

5,206.49 

18,431.84 

13,939.03 

4,492.81 

934,283 

1,074,746 

125,884 


2,606 


Passenger-train miles 


2,250 


Mixed-train miles . . . .. 


74 


Special-train miles .. ... 


5 


Transportation service train-miles. 


4,934 


Work-train miles .... 


200 


Locomotive-miles— transportation 


6,446 


Freight service car-miles . . 


88,415 


Passenger service car-miles . 


13,752 


Freight revenue 


$ 15,125.27 
5,810.65 
21,584.60 
16,125.80 
5,458.80 
1,165,298 
1,382,574 
140,307 


Passenger service train revenue. . 


Operating revenues . 


Operating expenses 


Net operating revenues... 


Ton-miles — revenue freight 


Ton-miles— all freight 


Passenger-miles— revenue.. 





112 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 
1922 


Amount, 
1923 


22.20 


22.58 


4.67 


5.14 


9.20 


9.98 


1.77 


1.98 


417.92 


437.58 


480 .75 


519.17 


5.72 


6.04 


2.04 


2.02 


57.21 


61.92 


$ 5.65 


$ 5.68 


2.37 


2.56 


4.15 


4.37 


3.14 


3.27 


1.01 


1.11 


.95 


.95 


30.99 


31.97 


.97 


.97 


5.57 


5.87 


.99 


.98 


8.49 


9.05 


.93 


.94 


13.78 


11.09 


19.18 


19.68 


. 22 .06 


23.35 


$ 0.25936 


$ .25546 


14.64 


14.98 


$ .50487 


$ 0.51716 


183.47 


178.25 


171.26 


200 .38 


181.78 


181.40 


59.89 


65.92 


% 2.48157 
.01353 


$ 2.31359 
.01298 


2 .06532 


2 .27497 


.03449 


.03451 


75.62 


74.71 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles— freight trains 

Car-miles— freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles— mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight. 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue -.- 

Averages per Car-mile— Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried— revenue passengers _ 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent) 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



113 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE STATE 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




1,219.50 


1,219.50 






Train-miles: 
Freight— 


3,185,582 
50,851 


3,825,051 


Lio-ht .... .__.. - --- 


34,605 








3,206,433 

2,806,567 

63,244 

6,093 


3,859,656 




3,008,975 




61,576 




6,269 








6,112,337 


6,936,476 








234,621 


488,847 






Locomotive-miles : 
Freight- 


3,236,433 
197,303 
83,634 


3,859,656 




270,801 


Light - - . ------- 


96,176 








3,517,370 


4,226,633 






Passenger- 


2,806,567 
21,476 
42,456 


3,008,975 




28,513 


Light 


40,936 








2,870,499 


3,078,424 






Mixed train — 


63,244 
26 


61,576 






Light 


40 










63,270 


61,616 






Special — 


6,093 
343 

146 


6,269 




930 


Light 


154 








6,582 


7,353 






Train switching . . _. . . . 


118,744 


145,590 






Yard switching — 

Freight... 


1,767,032 
154,431 


2,102,034 


Passenger .. 


191,507 






Total yard switching locomotive-miles 


1,921,463 


2,293,541 








8,497,928 


9,813,157 






Work service 


234,621 


488,847 







Part II— 8 



114 



N. C. COEPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 


Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Cab-miles: 
Freight train- 


86,852,089 
29,679,619 


103,476,845 




41,497,539 








116,531,708 

3,236,823 

539, 105 


144,974,384 




3,859,916 




644,407 








120,307,636 


149,478,707 






Passenger train — 


7,134,722 

4,375,212 

710,533 

4,874,140 


7,656,053 




5,301,526 




897,235 


Other. 


5,667,254 








17,094,607 


19,522,068 






Mixed train — 


277,244 

66,543 

3,788 

132,097 

14 


286,378 




72,160 




3,850 




128,834 








20 




15,026 


15,505 








494,712 


506,747 






Special train — 


69,202 
6,042 

19,298 

3,270 

128 

1,448 


57,061 




6,257 




13,516 




6,574 








2,068 








99,388 


95,476 








137,996,343 


169,602,998 








266,352 


282,838 







SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



115 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 Amount, 1923 



Freight Service: 
Tons- 
Revenue freight 

Nonre venue freight 

Total tons, freight service 

Ton-miles — 

Revenue freight— 

Nonre venue freight 

Total ton-miles, freight service 

Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried — revenue . 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues _ 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles... 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation... 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger-miles — revenue 



11,474,063 
2,330,985 



13,897,301 
3,416,963 



13,805,048 



17,314,264 



1,462,924,587 
300,293,478 



1,794,062,104 
498,042,796 



1,763,218,065 



2,292,104,900 



4,382,908 
186,908,517 



4,176,297 
221,028,813 



$20,062,676.03 
6,440,294.38 
7,639,560.64 



$ 23,216,348.14 
7,681,867.79 
9,025,555.67 



$28,307,809.73 
19,837,715.51 



$ 33,043,069.49 
24,734,570.32 



8,470,094.22 



,308,499.17 



2,654 

2,301 

52 

5 

5,012 

192 

6,968 

99,000 

14,158 

16,451.56 

6,264.50 

23,213.64 

16,267.09 

6,945.55 

1,199,610 

1,445,853 

153,267 



3,165 

2,467 

51 

5 

5,688 

401 

8,647 

122,931 

16,145 

19,037.60 

7,401.03 

27,095.59 

20,282.55 

6,813.04 

1,471,146 

1,879,845 

181,245 



116 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


26.84 




26.81 


4.38 




4.65 


9.17 




10.75 


1.05 




1.17 


445 .90 




459 .58 


537.42 




587.16 


6.09 




6.49 


2.33 




2.34 


66.15 




73.03 


$ 6.12 


$ 


5.95 


2.70 




2.98 


4.63 




4.77 


3.25 




3.57 


1.38 




1.20 


.92 




.91 


34 .20 




35.37 


.98 




.98 


5.96 




6.34 


1.00 




1.00 


7.82 




8.22 


.93 




.85 


15.10 




12.98 


16.79 




17.29 


20.24 




22.09 


$ .23026 


$ 


.22374 


16.05 




16.89 


$ 0.55319 


$ 


.58701 


127.50 




129.09 


128.83 




145.76 


127.72 




132.38 


42.64 




52.92 


S 1 .74852 


$ 


1 .67057 


.01371 




.01294 


1.46941 




1 .83940 


.03446 




.03476 


70.08 




74.86 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight— 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent) 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



117 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 





1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 Lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 Lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 

Wheat 

Corn 


10,533 

7,461 

6,224 

1,278 

20,499 

18,349 

15,383 

20,933 

56,476 

18,686 

6,812 

22,971 

5,565 

9,977 

1,029 

4,385 


383,997 
234,762 
142,119 

26,804 
346,838 
327,302 
184,160 
213,985 
617,695 
355,424 

96,823 
296,916 

93,556 
121,707 

20,035 

66,036 


12,205 

9,969 

8,910 

1,901 

24,011 

26,913 

19,384 

27,069 

56,633 

21,296 

10,889 

24,145 

5,293 

9,486 

1,758 

4,421 


447,928 
315,780 
207,587 




36,850 




401,252 




488,418 




234,898 




275,956 




624,177 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 


399,470 
155,199 




305,799 




88,150 




113,592 




33,577 




71,533 






Totals 


226,561 


3,528,159 


264,283 


4,200,166 


Animals and Products: 


2,391 

9,105 

580 

4,175 

2,496 

2,734 

1,263 

2,015 

435 

143 

3.120 

1,210 


25,288 
97,257 
4,980 
41,125 
33,816 
37,749 
12,292 
21,221 
4,754 
1,417 
70,376 
22,852 


4,012 

9,362 

595 

4,336 

2,552 

5,208 

1,510 

1,905 

647 

189 

3,598 

1,642 


43,529 
100 135 






4 783 


Hogs ... .. 


42 544 


Fresh meats 


32 184 




71 085 


Poultry 


15,480 
19,672 
7,451 
1,918 
80,395 
31 617 


Eggs... .. ... . . 


Butter and cheese .. -...._ 


Wool 




Other animals and products .. ... 






Totals 


29,667 


373,127 


35,556 


450,793 




Products of Mines: 
Anthracite coal ... . 


302 

205,668 

14,418 

4,820 

2,836 

49 

74,536 

758 

1,274 

3,944 

5,436 


12,788 

10,352,864 

555,003 

251,586 

118,249 

1,652 

3,324,352 

22,493 

41,968 

91,140 

192,048 


973 

255,793 

22,860 

10,098 

3,793 

77 

101,755 

1,333 

1,773 

4,017 

8,280 


45,325 

12,942,436 

893,544 

527,604 

157,631 

2,276 

4,626,923 

36,781 

60,765 

93,940 

307,845 


Bituminous coal . 


Coke 


Iron ore 


Other ores and concentrates 


Base bullion and matte 


Clay, gravel, sand, and stone 


Crude petroleum _ 


Asphaltum . 


Salt 


Other products of mines 




Totals 


314,041 


14,964,141 


410,752 


19,695,070 





118 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— Continued 






1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 Lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 Lbs.) 


Products op Forests: 


48,755 
6,982 
7,170 

177,664 
6,494 


1,172,423 
192,154 
176,369 

4,416,626 
125,352 


57,688 
18,860 
27,484 

238,672 
9,968 


1,441,815 


Ties 


549,751 




636,037 


Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and 


6,002,898 




189,505 






Totals. . 


247,065 


6,082,924 


352,672 


8,820,006 






Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 
Refined petroleum and its products 


28,333 

2,162 
7,068 
48 
7,329 
1,906 

13,320 
1,239 
4,604 
18,017 
28,993 
9,662 
7,722 

4,379 
11,060 

2,690 

10,263 

567 

4,663 

38,167 

824 

7,885 

15,325 

2,198 

126,320 


739,609 
60,713 

146,879 
650 

305,550 
80,365 

345,370 
38,645 
76,381 
651,825 
913,312 
232,395 
147, 154 

58,321 
75,386 

23,963 

78,400 

10,395 

63,043 

867,460 

18,659 

215,180 

150,223 

44,714 

2,615,977 


38,169 
2,389 
8,092 
38 
8,781 
3,600 

21,338 
1,799 
10,359 
22,871 
36,171 
12,113 
9,537 

10,128 
26,447 

2,620 

16,842 

936 

4,814 
48,424 

1,473 

9,262 
18,770 

3,731 
115,864 


1,014,558 
67,931 


Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 


180,206 
374 




367,321 




147,348 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and 


570,952 




57,987 




175,081 




848.349 




1,170,394 




300,631 




172,341 


Agricultural implements and vehicles 


161,147 




180,329 


Household goods and second-hand furni- 


22,294 




128,054 




15,495 




66,408 




1,128,309 




34,263 




239,840 


Textiles 


188,414 


Canned goods (all canned food products) - 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 


78,744 
2,461,306 


Totals 


354,744 


7,960,569 


434,000 


9,778,076 








1,172,078 


32,908,922 
2,589,347 




42,944,111 






2,629,825 










Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. 




35,498,269 




45,573,936 











SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



119 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED 


DURING THE YEAR— WITHIN THE STATE 






1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 Lbs.) 


Number • 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 Lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


3,043 

1,173 

1,678 

310 

8,583 

6,568 

4,934 

13,443 

26,220 

5,497 

3,494 

11,777 

3,330 

5,631 

602 

1,376 


112,093 

33,397 

37,430 

6,248 

122,225 

113,401 

59,360 

132,436 

294,174 

91,981 

48,740 

149,633 

53,430 

74,974 

9,283 

20,294 


3,588 

1,562 

2,053 

429 

9,674 

8,509 

5,824 

16,276 

26,334 

5,928 

3,727 

10,750 

2,581 

5,275 

841 

1,455 


129,972 




44,133 


Oats --- - - - 


44,740 




7,968 




131,576 




148,683 




71,958 




166,248 




295,145 


Cotton seed and products, except oil 


106,156 
53,997 




133,904 




42,975 




59,947 




14,941 




21,341 






Totals 


97,619 


1,362,599 


104,806 


1,473,684 






Animals and Products: 


669 

1,830 
83 

1,463 
613 

1,065 

723 

744 

138 

33 

2,092 
459 


7,423 

19,177 
697 

16,136 
8,934 

13,774 

7, 158 

7,008 

1,638 

363 

46,726 
9,540 


1,181 

2,037 
69 

1,635 
811 

1,714 

853 

582 

192 

61 

2,492 
779 


13,310 




22,021 




559 




16,059 




10,004 




22,176 




8,167 




5,858 




2,195 


Wool 


618 




54,947 




16,051 






Totals .. 


9,912 


138,574 


12,406 


171,965 






Products of Mines: 


121 

44,709 

1,018 

341 

985 

11 

24,943 

53 

439 

1,426 

2,063 


5,021 

2,303,684 

29,822 

14,119 

37,630 

376 

1,084,777 

1,503 

14,344 

34,337 

76,397 


317 

64,922 

1,279 

564 

1,061 

15 

36,674 

56 

721 

1,501 

3,487 


13,392 




3,329,372 


Coke 


37,437 




27,796 




40,916 




550 




1,168,818 




1,573 




24,491 


Salt 


37,221 




133,862 






Totals 


76,109 


3,602,010 


110,597 


5,265,428 







120 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Commodity 



1922 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 Lbs.) 



1923 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 Lbs. 



Products of Forests: 

Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 

Ties 

Pulp wood 

Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and 

headings 

Other products of forests 



Totals. 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, sirup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and 



iron pipe 

Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement --- 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles 

other than automobiles 

Automobiles and auto trucks 

Household goods and second-hand furni- 
ture. 

Furniture (new) 

Beverages 

Ice 



Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives. 

Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products). 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous — 

Totals 



Grand totals, carload traffic. 
Merchandise— all L. C. L. freight.. 



Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. 
traffic 



17,092 
1,626 
3,137 

83,699 
1,763 



107,317 



7,629 

1,017 

2,271 

19 

954 

248 

4,263 
562 
2,327 
6,887 
7,593 
3,430 
3,071 



1,620 
4,368 

1,384 

7,210 

141 

765 

10,234 

510 

3,109 

11,725 

858 

49,482 



131,677 



422,634 



422,634 



395,261 
43,113 
77,340 

2,011,565 
33,118 



2,560,397 



195,986 
27,392 
45,811 
196 
38,235 
6,386 

100,626 
16,244 
39,043 
258,901 
246,511 
79,212 
53,930 

21,212 

26,585 

11,229 
51,076 
3,118 
13,072 

256,307 
11,945 
88,123 

113,679 
17,051 

911,262 



2,633,132 



10,296,712 
1,177,351 



11,474,063 



16,752 
5,968 
16,235 

109,198 
3,258 



151,411 



10,822 

1,197 

2,184 

10 

515 

418 

6,523 
497 
5,254 
8,423 
9,600 
4,326 
4,026 

3,037 
9,724 

1,072 

11,840 

245 

710 

13,623 

948 

3,720 

13,695 

1,308 

45,776 



159,493 



538,713 



390,642 
169,946 
364,091 

2,662,448 
65, 767 



3,652,894 



285,208 
35,070 
45,412 
99 
19,912 
11,357 

158,531 
13,168 
83,034 
319,328 
315,618 
99,307 
66,843 

52,603 
58,108 

8,048 

83,866 
3,987 

11,364 
327,868 

22,571 
101,781 
131,566 

26,209 
858,014 



3,138,872 



13,702,843 
1,194,458 



14,897,301 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



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Lease 

from a 

Railway 

Compan; 






CO 

co" 


55 


Fh 

03 
03 

5h 








—i 










53 


"o 










CO 


CO 


»o 


C 


03 


*■< 












CO 

oo 




o 

O 


Numbe 
Held 
Under 
Equip- 
ment 
Trust 














> 


03 
















& 


V 
















H 










EC 


(H 




US I -H CO O Tj< 


CO 


CO 


as 




i—i i co r— oo 


o 


CD 


5* 
55 

Ph 




03 . T3 


1 ,— 1 -^ 




co 

CO 


o 

0) 

3 • 








CO 


O 


"3 










o 












> 




ca h Tf h oo co 


o 


oo 




«1 




i-H CO tH OO t-i 


t^ 


CO 




—i 03 

03 -O 


I-H CO 


00 






CO 


^ 




US 






° h 






US 




a 










53 


H z 






















co 




































03 


















u 


















a3 








-*a 


















03 

a 

a 










a3 


03 
















>j 


03 






"3 








6 


fl 


CO 






o 1 








03 


ca 


# fl 






H 










a 








(*H 








a3 


a 


£ 






O 


CO ] 




.2 


o 


03 






CO 


03 ' 




> 


o 


o 






co 

03 

3 


68 

a ; 

"* CO I 

o3 o3 I 
"co +, ^ 

bee 

8 | -| 


,2 ? 

03 C 

o t 

43 b 
co c 

03 fc 


u 
CO 

CO 

>i 

9 

t 

° s 

03 


"o 

CO 

03 

< 


"8 

1 

a 

O 

< 








c 


> Ph- C 


w £ 


o 







CO -# i-H 


r^ 






1 CO 1 


CD 


CO O i-H 
CO 


CO 


CO *# i-H 


t^ 






1 CO 1 




N N H 


o 


Steamboats and tugboats 

Barges, car floats, and canal boats 

Other floating equipment 


03 

a 

a 
'3 

O" 

03 

M 

a 

«8 

o 

la 
o 



124 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Name of State 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 12,727.58 
717,440.10 
1,646,725.92 
856,402.32 
546,929.95 
474,835.34 

44,323.19 
749,913.30 

65,478.71 
223,290.06 
169,396.80 


$ 12,792.34 




764,198.03 




1,638,427.44 




937,927.47 




584,310.30 




446,388.10 




68,352.35 




742,083.01 




188,621.16 




274,636.75 




168,364.97 






Totals 


5,507,463.27 


5,826,101.92 







U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Kind of Tax 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 59,806.00 
197,169.25 


$ 64,013.00 








1,066,426.24 






37,000.00 






866.10 










256,975.25 


1,168,305.34 






Grand totals -.. - - - -- 


5,763,689.46 


6,994,407.26 







SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



125 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 





1922 


1923 


Class of Employees 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 

Executives, general officers, and assistants 

Division officers, assistants, and staff assistants.. . 


204 
165 


11,277,091 
693,821 


208 
174 


$ 1,316,286 
743,201 


Totals - ... . . 


369 


1,970,912 


382 


2,059,487 






Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 


61 

24 

37 
48 
212 

246 

461 

3,403 

179 

341 

136 

575 

30 

71 

64 

98 
170 
109 

87 
203 

50 

62 
212 

9 

74 
4 
5 

7 
72 


185,980 

56,843 

74,752 
108,686 
523,864 

521,102 
842,813 
5,040,377 
219,572 
439,824 
246,422 
784,941 
78,897 
138,248 
174,207 

96,448 
110,102 

93,522 
194,182 
489,011 

55,017 
215,722 
548,377 

24,120 
194,414 

9,384 
11,280 

8,930 
49,922 


58 

26 

33 
43 
202 

282 

485 

3,435 

175 

360 

152 

554 

35 

75 

59 

101 
162 
113 
87 
126 
51 
81 
200 

9 

76 

3 

4 

6 

66 


183,200 


Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 
ants (B) .. 


60,841 


Subprofessional engineering and laboratory as- 


67,091 


Professional and subprofessional legal assistants.. 
Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments). . 
Chief clerks (minor departments) and assistant 


97,363 
509,322 

589,332 




868,337 


Clerks (B) 


5,032,744 


Clerks (C) 


203,028 




455,251 




270,546 




755,142 




87,577 




149,370 




165,187 


Telephone switchboard operators and office as- 


95,933 




100,753 


Elevator operators and other office attendants 

Lieutenants and sergeants of police 


92,249 
192,436 




235,895 




54,135 




268,746 


Traffic agents, advertising and development agents 
Fire prevention, smoke, and time-service in- 
spectors and office building superintendents 

Claim agents and claim investigators. 


518,732 

24,120 
198,521 


Real estate and tax agents and investigators 

Examiners, instructors, and special investigators. 


7,814 
11,071 
8,349 


Janitors and cleaners .... . 


44,521 






Totals— 


1,315 
5,735 


2,953,375 
8,583,968 


1,325 
5,734 


2,994,529 




8,353,077 







126 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION— Continued 



Class of Employees 



1922 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



1923 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Roadmasters and general foremen 

Supervising maintenance of way inspectors and 

scale inspectors 

Maintenance of way inspectors 

Bridge and building gang foremen 

Bridge and building carpenters 

Bridge and building painters 

Masons, bricklayers, plasterers, and plumbers 

Skilled trades helpers 

Portable steam equipment operators 

Portable steam equipment operator helpers 

Pumping 'equipment operators 

Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers) 

Gang or section foremen 

Laborers (extra gang and work-train) 

Track and roadway section laborers 

Maintenance of way laborers (other than track 

and roadway) and gardeners and farmers 

General foremen and supervising inspectors (sig- 
nal, telegraph, and electrical transmission) 

Gang foremen (signal and telegraph skilled trades 

labor). 

Signalmen and signal maintainers 

Linemen and groundmen 

Assistant signalmen and assistant signal main- 
tainers 

Signalman and signal maintainer helpers 

Totals- 
Daily basis 

Hourly basis.. 



131 

7 

2 

143 

335 

25 

8 

330 

45 

29 

236 

74 

1,187 

1,217 

6,527 

426 

11 



56 



142 

10,697 



420,720 

16,560 

4,641 

254,970 

472,182 

33,336 

12,527 

356,459 

80,744 

33,356 

182,421 

129,667 

1,749,494 

746,834 

4,157,625 

375,766 

34,212 

20,691 
105,317 

14,861 

38,166 
11,183 



454,932 



132 

7 

3 

168 

396 

41 

13 

418 

57 

31 

242 

113 

1,222 

1,932 

7,669 



143 

12,926 



424,101 

16,560 

5,642 

290,518 

518,891 

49,843 

16,100 

419,920 

94,435 

33,808 

182,674 

184,339 

1,777,997 

1,097,699 

4,542,406 

404,527 

34,324 

20,581 

118,427 

14,630 

35,964 

28,188 



458,425 
,853,149 



ASHEVILLE AND CRAGGY MOUNTAIN RAILWAY 



127 



ASHEVILLE AND CRAGGY MOUNTAIN RAILWAY 

COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Fairfax Harrison 

F. S. Wynn 

C. E. A. McCarthy 

E. F. Parham 

E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 




Washington, D. C. 




New York, N. Y. 




Washington, D. C. 




Washington, D. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Belvoir, Va. ; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C. ; C. E. A. McCarthy, 
New York, N. Y. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. ; E. A. Merrill, New York, N. Y. 



HISTORY 

Organized July 22, 1890, under Laws of North Carolina, under act of General Assembly, 
ratified March 11, 1889. 





ROAD OPERATED 






From — 


To— 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Craggy, N. C 


Burnsville Road, N. C 


2.26 
2.18 




Connection — Asheville Sou. Ry., N. C. 


Glenns Creek, N. C. .. 


4.44 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 


1922 


1923 


Capital stock. .______. 


$ 24,200.00 

10,708.00 

33,785.05 

14,949.13 

14,494.13 

24,971.73 

18,799.63 

1 6,172.10 

5,624.27 

4,234.15 

24,971.73 

5,624.27 


S 24,200.00 


Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road ... . 


10,708.00 
33,785.05 


Cost of road, per mile.. . ___• ._ 


14,949.13 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue-.. . . ... .__ . 


14,949.13 
30,288.00 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue .. - 


17,489.65 
12,479.35 


Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile _____ . 


6,821.62 
3,939.11 


Total freight revenue. ... _______________ 


27,376.25 




6,165 82 


Revenue from other sources . . 


2,911.75 


Taxes paid, North Carolina. . 


447.62 


532.66 









Employees, 1922: Number enginemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; 
other trackmen, 4; total, 8. Employees, 1923: Number enginemen, 1; conductors, 1: other trainmen, 
1: section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; total, 8. 



128 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



ASHEVILLE SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

(Operated by Asheville and Craggy Mountain Railway Company.) 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President 


Fairfax Harrison 

F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 




E. F. Parham 


Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller 


E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS 

D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C. ; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C. ; Louis Fahnestock, 
Washington, D. C. ; James H. Pou, Raleigh, N. C. ; Fairfax Harrison, Belvoir, Va. ; F. S. 
Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized December 29, 1905, under Laws of North Carolina. Line from connection with 
Asheville and Craggy Mountain Railway to Glen Rock (plant of National Casket Company), 
2.13 miles, was completed July 20, 1909 (operated by Asheville and Craggy Mountain Rail- 
way Company). 



ROAD OPERATED 




Asheville, N. C, to Glenns Creek, N. C. (miles) 


2.18 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 



60,000.00 


$ 60,000.00 


27,522.93 


27,622.93 


53,782.25 


53,782.25 


24,670.76 


24,670.76 


24,670.76 


24,670.76 



Note. — Operating revenue, expenses, etc., included in report of Asheville and Craggy Mountain. 
Railway Company. 



ATLANTA AND CHARLOTTE AIR LINE RAILWAY 



129 



ATLANTA AND CHARLOTTE AIR LINE RAILWAY 

COMPANY 







OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 




George F. Canfield 

Harlan F. Stone 

John W. Platten 


27 William St., New York, N. Y. 
27 William St., New York, N. Y. 
55 Cedar St., New York, N. Y. 



DIRECTORS 

Charles S. Fairchild, Cazenovia, N. Y. ; Herbert L. Griggs, 48 Wall Street, New York ; 

Hiram W. Sibley, Rochester, N. Y. ; George F. Canfield, 27 William Street, New York ; 

Harlan F. Stone, New York ; Robert L. Harrison, 59 Wall Street, New York ; E. W. 

Lancaster, 160 Broadway, New York ; John A. Middleton, 143 Liberty Street, New York ; 

Henry Parrish, 52 Wall Street, New York ; John W. Platten, 55 Cedar Street, New York ; 
Morvean Delano, New York ; Henry M. McAden, Charlotte, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized April 4, 1877 (a consolidation of three separate companies, formed March 19, 
1877), under Laws of North Carolina, Act of March 1, 1873; South Carolina, Act of 
March 24, 1876, Laws of 1876 ; Georgia, Act of February 29, 1876. Consolidation authorized 
by laws under which the separate companies were formed. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To— 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Charlotte, N. C 


Armour, Ga 


43.18 


263 .08 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 


1922 


1923 


Capital stock __ __ . . _ 


$ 1,700,000.00 

6,461.92 

20,000,000.00 

76,022.50 

21,700,000.00 

82,484.42 

1,128,000.00 


$ 1,700,000.00 

6,461.92 

20,000,000.00 

76,022.50 

21,700,000.00 

82,484 42 


Capital stock, per mile _ 


Funded debt . . . . 


Funded debt, per mile . . . ..._.___..._..___... 


Cost of road and equipment 


Cost of road and equipment, 


per mile. ... 


Revenue from other sources.. 




1,128 000 00 







Note. — Road is operated by Southern Railway Company. 



Part II— 9 



130 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



ATLANTIC AND DANVILLE RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President.. . .. ... 




London, E.C., England. 


Vice-President 




Secretary-Treasurer 













DIRECTORS 

Edgar Newgrass, London, England ; C. L. Candler, Norfolk, Va. ; A. B. Carrington, 
Danville, Va. ; Edward R. ■ Baird, Norfolk, Va. ; Charles O. Haines, Portsmouth, Va. ; 
W. H. M. Reed, Portsmouth, Va. ; Felix Rose, London, England. 



HISTORY 

The Atlantic and Danville Railway Company is a corporation of the State of Virginia, 
authorized by act of the General Assembly, approved April 2, 1882. 

The company was sold under deed of trust, securing a general mortgage and reorganized 
August 2, 1894. 

The reorganization of the new company was authorized in the State of North Carolina 
by an act of the General Assembly, certified February 25, 1895. 

The road was leased to the Southern Railway by an agreement dated August 31, 1899, for 
a term to expire July 1, 1949. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To— 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 






22.15 


277.71 

















CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 



$ 2,180,000.00 

7,850.00 

5,450,000.00 

19,624.82 

7,607,984.35 

27,395.43 

36,820.25 

132 .58 

27,528.01 



$ 2,180,000.00 

7,825.00 

5,450,000.00 

19,562.00 

7,607,984.35 

27,395.43 

36,820.25 

132 .58 

27,528.01 



Note. — This road was leased to Southern Railway Company in August, 1899, and has since been 
operated by them. 
General officers: 3. 



ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY 



131 



ATLANTIC AND YADKIN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 










H. W. Miller 


Washington, D. C. 






Washington, D. C. 




F. S. Wynn___. 








Washington, D. C. 




G. E. Mauldin.. 






E. F. Parham 






E. H. Kemper.. 











DIRECTORS 

C. H. Ireland, Greensboro, N. C. ; A. E. Smith, Mount Airy, N. C. ; J. C. Watkins, Greens- 
boro, N. C. ; D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C. ; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C. ; F. S. 
Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 31, 1899, under Laws of North Carolina. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Mount Airy, N. C 


Sanford, N. C 


130 .95 
2.02 
18.74 
11.39 




Mount Airy, N. C 


Woodruff, N. C 




Climax, N. C 






Stokesdale, N. C 


Madison, N. C 


163.10 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 


1922 


1923 


Capital stock _. 


$ 1,000,000.00 

6,131.20 

1,500,000.00 

6,196.81 

2,345,852.90 

14,382.91 

932,505.71 

885,331.65 

47,174.06 

5,717.38 

5,428.15 

651,883.83 

271,367.14 

3,996.84 

210,992 

$ 1,663.81 

9,254.94 

.103538 

59,000.06 


$ 1,000,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


6,131.20 


Funded debt . .. 


1,500,000.00 


Funded debt, per mile 


6,196.81 


Cost of road and equipment 


2,355,484.12 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


14,441.96 


Operating revenue 


1,025,444.65 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 


994,540.26 


Net operating revenue . 


30,904.39 


Operating revenue, per mile 


6,287.21 


Operating expenses, per mile... .. 


6,097.73 


Total freight revenue 


763,616.61 


Total passenger-train service revenue . 


250,208.01 


Freight revenue, per mile 


4,681.89 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


183,760 


Passenger service train revenue, per mile 


$ 1,534.08 


Revenue from other sources 


11,620.03 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile. 


.103513 


Taxes paid, North Carolina 


33,151.27 







Employees: 1922, 209; 1923, 247. 



132 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAROLINA AND TENNESSEE SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


N. m « 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 




H. W. Miller. 




L. E. Jeffries 


Washington, D. C. 




L. Green . 






F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 




G. E. Mauldin 




E. F. Parham 






E. H. Kemper 











DIRECTORS 

J. G. Brown, Raleigh, N. C. ; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C. ; L. A. Mahler, 
Raleigh, N. C. ; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C. ; R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga. ; F. S. Wynn, 
Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized August 29, 1902, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Bushnell, N. C., to Fontana, N. C. (miles). 



13.90 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile. 

Funded debt 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Revenue from other sources 



60,000.00 


% 60,000.00 


4,316.54 


4,316.54 


643,000.00 


643,000.00 


575,285.84 


570,865.31 


41,387.47 


41,069.44 


28,143.86 


35,791.21 


26,377.03 


30,770.30 


1,766.83 


5,020.91 


2,074.73 


2,574.90 


1,897.62 


2,213.70 


22,807.93 


29,116.78 


4,144.24 


5,447.07 


1,191.69 


1,227.36 



Employees: 1922, 8; 1923, 9. 



DANVILLE AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



133 



DANVILLE AND WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 
















G. E. Mauldin 






E. F. Parham 

















DIRECTORS 

D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C. ; Pannell Rucker, Richmond, Va. ; Fairfax Harrison, 
Washington, D. C. ; R. A. Schoolfield, Danville, Va. ; Samuel Hairston, Wenonda, Va. ; 
J. B. Sparrow, Martinsville, Va. ; J. E. Latham, Greensboro, N. C. ; J. P. Swanson, Dan- 
ville, Va. ; B. F. Mebane, Spray, N. C. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. ; J. I. Pritchett, 
Danville, Va. 



HISTORY 

Organized January 14, 1891, under Laws of Virginia. Charter, March 29, 1873. Amended 
acts, 1876-77, 1881-82, 5 and 6. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 






8.96 


82.04 









134 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock ' 

Capital stock, per mile . . 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile- 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile... 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger service train revenue. 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



368,600.00 

4,802.00 

2,297,773.75 

29,934.00 

1,910,372.45 

24,887.00 

284,714.57 

3,709.0*0 

28,596.00 

609,371.84 

446,091.48 

163,279.86 

7,427.74 

5,437.49 

482,313.72 

117,355.10 

5,879.01 

117,992 

1,430.46 

9,703.02 

.0356 

3,345.99 



368,600.00 

4,802.00 

2,297,773.75 

29,934.00 

1,925,514.84 

25,085.00 

271,333.82 

3,535.00 

28,620.00 

647,246.22 

461,896.59 

185,349.63 

7,889.40 

5,630.14 

542,747.17 

92,764.45 

6,615.64 

92,640 

1,130.72 

11,734.60 

.0346 

2,520.02 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 54; station agents, 19; other station 
men, 15; enginemen, 6; firemen, 6; conductors, 6; other trainmen, 16; machinists, 2; carpenters, 5; 
other shopmen, 17; telegraph operators, 5; section foremen, 7; other trackmen, 44; other employees, 
13; total, 220. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 54; station agents, 18; other 
station men, 15; enginemen, 6; firemen, 6; conductors, 6; other trainmen, 16; machinists, 3; carpenters, 
7; other shopmen, 17; telegraph operators, 4; section foremen, 7; other trackmen, 58; other employees, 
2; total, 224. 

Note. — This road was leased to Southern Railway Company in August, 1899, and has since been 
operated by them. 



135 



HIGH POINT, RANDLEMAN, ASHEBORO AND SOUTHERN 
RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 




F. S. Wynn 












L. E. Jeffries 






G. E. Mauldin 






E. F. Parham 

















DIRECTORS 

A. M. Bulla, Randleman, N. C. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. ; J. Elwood Cox, High 
Point, N. C. ; R. F. Dalton, Greensboro, N. C. ; T. J. Finch, Thomasville, N. C. ; Fairfax 
Harrison, Washington, D. C. ; F. N. Tate, High Point, N. C. ; P. H. Morris, Asheboro, N. C. ; 
J. S, McAllister, Greensboro, N. C. ; F. M. Pickett, High Point, N. C. ; W. H. Ragan, High 
Point, N. C. ; J. E. Walker, Asheboro, N. C. ; W. P. Wood, Raleigh, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized February 26, 1887, under Laws of North Carolina, 1883. 



ROAD OPERATED 



High Point, N. C, to Asheboro, N. C. (miles). 



27.84 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. _. 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



248,400.00 


$ 248,400.00 


8,822.41 


8,822.41 


402,000.00 


402,000.00 


14,439.62 


14,439.62 


678,859.39 


678,992.67 


24,384.34 


24,389.10 


174,934.27 


182,334.82 


120,998.16 


133,299.29 


53,936.11 


49,035.53 


6,283.56 


6,549.38 


4,346.20 


4,788.05 


132,217.71 


141,345.16 


38,861.60 


33,599.78 


4,749.20 


5,077.05 


52,422 


41,601 


3,854.96 


$ 7,389.88 


.03552 


.03584 


8,150.00 


9,236.74 



Employees, 1922 : general officers, 35 ; office clerks, 8 ; station agents, 8 . 1923 — 6. 



136 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS 





Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
New York N Y 




L. E. Jeffries 

F. S. Wynn . 




Secretary 


C. E. A. McCarthy. 


Treasurer 


E. F. Parham.. 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller _ 


E. H. Kemper.. ... 





DIRECTORS 

W. S. Camp, Washington, D. C. ; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C. ; C. E. A. McCarthy, 
New York, N. Y. ; C. D. Mackay, Washington, D. C. ; J. W. Martin, Washington, D. C. ; 
Guy E. Mauldin, Washington, D. C. ; E. A. Merrill, New York, N. Y. ; F. S. Wynn, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



Organized March 13, 
amended March 2, 1899. 



1899, 



HISTORY 
under Laws of North 



Carolina, February 22, 1890, and 



ROAD OPERATED 



State Line to Mines, N. C. (miles). 



3.73 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment. 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 



1922 



50,000.00 
13,405.00 
62,211.08 
16,678.00 
112,211.08 
30,083.40 



1923 



50,000.00 
13,405.00 
62,211.08 
16,678.00 
112,211.08 
30,083.40 



Note.— This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company, and revenue, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD 



137 



NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Wade H. Harris 

Archibald Johnson 


Charlotte, N. C. 
Burlington, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Bennehan Cameron, Stagville, N. C. ; R. W. H. Stone, Greensboro, N. C. ; W. E. Holt, 
Lexington, N. C. ; William Weill, Charlotte, N. C. ; W. T. Brown, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; 
J. F. Bowles, Statesville, N. C. ; Hugh MacRae, Wilmington, N. C. ; C. W. Johnston, 
Charlotte, N. C. ; Gilbert C. White, Durham, N. C. ; Robert Lassiter, Charlotte, N. C. ; 
Wade H. Harris, Charlotte, N. C. ; Alexander Webb, Raleigh, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized January 1, 1850, under Laws of North Carolina. North Carolina, January 27, 
1849, February 14, 1855, February 16, 1874. 





ROAD OPERATED 




Goldsboro, N. C. 


to Charlotte, N. C. (miles) 


223 .55 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



Capital stock _. 

Cost of equipment 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



1922 



$ 4,000,000.00 

4,975,627.53 

1,059.32 



1923 



$ 4,000,000.00 

4,975,627.53 

1,134.56 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 1; total, 5. Employees, 1923: Number 
general officers, 4; office clerks, 1; total, 5. 

Note. — Leased to Southern Railway Company August 16, 1895, said lease beginning January 1, 
1896; revenues and expenses covered in its report. 



13S 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



NORTH CAROLINA MIDLAND RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Washington, D. C. 




H. W. Miller 




F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 




L. E. Jeffries. 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 




G. E. Mauldin . .. 




E. F. Parham... . 




E. H. Kemper.. 


Washington, D. C. 









DIRECTORS 

J. A. Gray, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; G. W. Mountcastle, Lexington, N. C. ; J. F. Brawley, 
Mooresville, N. C. ; C. P. McNeely, Mooresville, N. C. ; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C. ; 
H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C. ; D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C. ; J. W. Fries, Winston- 
Salem, N. C. ; P. H. Hanes, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; W. N. Reynolds, Winston- Salem, N. C. ; 
R. T. Chatham, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; Mayor of Winston ; J. G. Hanes, Winston-Salem, 
N. C. ; J. F. Hanes, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized September, 1880. The Winston-Salem and Mooresville Railroad Company was 
chartered in North Carolina on August 6, 1878. This company on September 9, 1880, con- 
solidated with the Dan Valley and Yadkin River Railroad Company and the Winston-Salem 
and Madison Railroad Company. The Dan Valley and Yadkin River Narrow-gauge Rail- 
road Company was chartered in Virginia, January 27, 1879 (see Acts of Virginia, 1879, as 
amended by Acts of Virginia 1879-1880). On January 22, 1883, the North Carolina Mid- 
land Railroad Company and the Dan Valley and Yadkin River Narrow-gauge Railroad Com- 
pany were consolidated under the style of the North Carolina Midland Railroad Company. 
(See Battle's Revisal of North Carolina.) 



ROAD OPERATED 



Mooresville, N. C, to Winston-Salem, N. C. (miles). 



53 .52 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt.. 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment 
Cost of road, per mile 



924,000.00 
17,264.00 

801,000.00 

14,996.00 

1,722,000.00 

32,174.88 



924,000.00 
17,264.00 

801,000.00 

14,996.00 

1,722,000.00 

32,174.88 



Note. — This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company, and revenues, operating 
expenses, and other information are included in their report. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY CAROLINA DIVISION 



139 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY— CAROLINA DIVISION 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 










H. W. Miller 


Washington, D. C. 




F. S. Wynn 


Washington, D. C. 




L. E. Jeffries 






G. E. Mauldin , 


Washington, D. C. 




E. F. Parham 


Washington, D. C. 


Comptroller 


E. H. Kemper 


Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS 
L. Green, Washington, D. C. ; Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C. ; H. W. Miller, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; D. S. Abemethy, Washington, D. C. ; J. P. Matthews, Columbia, S. C. ; J. H. 
Pou, Raleigh, N. C. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized under General Laws of South Carolina, authorizing consolidation of corpora- 
tions, June, 1902. 

ROAD OPERATED 





Miles 


Cayce, S. C, to Hardeeville, S. C 


128.63 




67.93 


Biltmore, N. C, to Hayne, S. C 


66.01 




136.50 


Branchville, S. C, to Columbia, S. C. 


66.30 


Kingsville, S. C, to Marion, N. C . 


208 .50 


Perry, S. C, to Seivern, S. C 


7.64 


Blacksburg, S. C, to Gaffney, S. C 


10.50 




5.20 




15.81 








713 .02 


Leased: 
Transylvania Railroad Co. 

Hendersonville, N. C, to Lake Toxaway, N. C 


42.10 


Trackage Rights: 
Atlantic Coast Line — 


16.70 


Grand total miles... . . 


771 .82 






In North Carolina 


103 .74 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 


1922 


1923 




$ 4,176,200.00 

5,835.77 

11,259,500.00 

15,733.90 

15,524,556.08 

21,772.96 


S 4,176,200.00 
5,835 77 




Funded debt .. . .. ... . 


11,259,500 00 


Funded debt, per mile.. ... 


15,733 90 


Cost of road and equipment 


15,521,619.08 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile 


21,768.84 



Earnings and expenses, etc., included in report of Southern Railway Company. 



140 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATE UNIVERSITY RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President.. .. . . ..... 


Fairfax Harrison 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D C 


Vice-President ... . _________ 


H. W. Miller 


Vice-President 


L. E. Jeffries 




F. S. Wynn 


Secretary ... ...... 


G. E. Mauldin 


Treasurer.. .. .. ... 


E. F. Parham 


Comptroller. . ... ... ..... 


E. H. Kemper . 









DIRECTORS 

Fairfax Harrison, Washington, D. C. ; H. W. Miller, Washington, D. C. ; D. S. Abernethy, 
Washington, D. C. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. ; R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga. ; W. P. 
Few, Durham, N. C. ; W. A. Erwin, W. Durham, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized April 12, 1879, under Laws of North Carolina, 1872-1873. Amended, 1879. 



ROAD OPERATED 



University, N. C, to Chapel Hill, N. C. (miles). 



10.20 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 








Item 


1922 


1923 




$ 


31,300.00 
3,068.63 

31,300.00 
3,068.63 


$ 31,300.00 




3,068.63 




31,300.00 




3,068.63 











Note. — This railroad is operated by the Southern Railway Company, and revenue, operating 
and other information are included in their report. 



TALLULAH FALLS RAILWAY 



141 



TALLULAH FALLS RAILWAY COMPANY 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Comptroller 


R. B. Pegram 

F. S. Wynn 

GuyE. Mauldin 

E. F. Parham 

E. H. Kemper 


Atlanta, Ga. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS 

D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C. ; W. J. Reres, Atlanta, Ga. ; H. C. Cough, Atlanta, 
Ga. ; R. B. Pegram, Atlanta, Ga. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized March 8, 1898, under General Laws of State of Georgia. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To— 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 




Franklin, N. C 


14.00 


57.10 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock i 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment. 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



323,400.00 


$ 323,400.00 


5,575.86 


5,575 .86 


,519,000.00 


1,519,000.00 


26,189.86 


26,189.86 


,705,388.91 


1,707,040.33 


29,866.71 


29,895.62 


26,705.57 


13,446.90 


45,624.95 


21,556.52 


*18,919.38 


*8,109.62 


1,907.54 


960 .49 


3,258.92 


1,539.75 


13,898.89 


7,749.71 


10,683.35 


1,654.74 


992 .78 


553 .55 


23,046 


7,213 


763.10 


S 118.20 


2,123.23 


4,042.45 


.102851 


.03476 


2,300.00 


2,007.06 



Employees: 1922, 82; 1923, 86. 
'Deficit. 
Revenues, expenses, etc., are given for State of North Carolina. 



142 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



YADKIN RAILROAD COMPANY 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President. __ 




Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 




F. S. Wynn... 


Vice-President . ... __ 




Vice-President and General Counsel 


L. E. Jeffries 




G. E. Mauldin 




E. F. Parham. 











DIRECTORS 
D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C. ; A. H. Boyden, Salisbury, N. C. ; Fairfax Harrison, 
Washington, D. C. ; S. H. Hearne, Albemarle, N. C. ; D. W. Julian, Salisbury, N. C. ; J. M. 
Nichols, Washington, D. C. ; J. M. Morron, Albemarle, N. C. ; Walter Murphy, Salisbury, 
N. C. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized August 19, 1895, under Laws of North Carolina, 1871. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From— 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Salisbury, N. C 


Norwood, N. C 


41.00 
11.23 




Leased — Tallassee Power Co. — 
Halls Ferry Junction, N. C 


Badin, N. C 


52.23 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile .-. 

Cost of road and equipment 

'Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



625,000.00 


$ 625,000.00 


15,244.00 


15,244.00 


615,000.00 


615,000.00 


15,000.00 


15,000.00 


1,352,665.56 


1,358,850.97 


32,991.84 


33,142.71 


351,692.68 


419,517.08 


278,501.21 


297, 699 .08 


73,191.47 


121,818.00 


6,720.67 


8,032.00 


5,322.01 


5,599.77 


297,003.42 


365,212.67 


52,463.75 


51,619.10 


5,675.58 


6,992.39 


61,872 


55,578 


1,002.55 


$ 988 .30 


2,235.51 


2,685.31 


.103511 


.03597 


7,150.00 


8,721.28 



Employees: 1922, 102; 1923, 



ABERDEEN AND ROCKFISH RAILROAD 

MISCELLANEOUS RAILROADS 



143 



Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




W. A. Blue 


Aberdeen, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary-Treasurer 


J. A. Bryant. 

H. McC. Blue 


Aberdeen, N. C. 
Aberdeen, N. C. 




Fayetteville, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

W. A. Blue; H. J. Blue; H. McC. Blue; J. W. Graham; J. A. Bryant, all of Aberdeen, 
N. C. ; and H. W. Jackson, Richmond, Va. 

HISTORY 

Organized June 22, 1892, under Laws of North Carolina, Secretary of State, also Chapter 
22 of 1893, Chapter 45 of 1901, Chapter 401 of 1907, Chapter 200 of 1911, Chapter 289 of 
March, 1913. 



ROAD OPERATED 




Aberdeen, N. C., to Fayetteville, N. C. (miles) .... 


44.9 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



208,800.00 


$ 208,800.00 


4,650.33 


4,650.33 


127,000.00 


127,000.00 


2,828.51 


2,828.51 


311,555.17 


311,555.17 


6,938.86 


6,938.86 


91,326.61 


91,326.61 


2,034.00 


2,034.00 


8,972.86 


8,972.86 


163,031.63 


182,872.58 


139,039.66 


163,471.89 


23,991.97 


19,400.69 


3,630.99 


4,072.88 


3,096.65 


3,640.80 


138,520.76 


155,438.40 


12,878.01 


16,568.32 


3,085.09 


3,461.88 


17,340 


16,286 


286.81 


$ 369 .00 


11,632.86 


10,865.86 


.0326 


.0326 


5,828.89 


5,263.86 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 6; office clerks, 1; station agents, 5; other station men, 
4; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 3; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shop- 
men, 2; section foremen, 4; other trackmen, 16; other employees, 10; total, 60. Employees, 1923: Num- 
ber general officers, 6; office clerks, 1; station agents, 5; other station men, 4; enginemen, 2; firemen, 
2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 3; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 2; section foremen, 
4; other trackmen, 16; other employees, 10; total, 60. 



144 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Appalachian Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ela, N. C. 




J. A. Sisk 




John R. Alloy 

J. A. Sisk. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ela, N. C. 











DIRECTORS 

A. J. Stevens, Philadelphia, Pa.; E. M. Bechtel, Philadelphia, Pa.; Fred H. Ely, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; John R. Alloy, Philadelphia, Pa. ; E. A. Gaskill, Philadelphia, Pa. 



HISTORY 

Organized July 30, 1908, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 






Ela, N. C, to Ravensford, N. C. (miles) 10 


CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile .. 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue.. . 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



1922 



100,000.00 

10,000.00 

181,000.00 

18,100.00 

324,888.60 

32,488.86 

13,965.67 

1,396.56 

33,885.42 

80,979.17 

63,664.56 

17,314.61 

8,097.91 

6,366.45 

77,333.79 

2,172.71 

7,733.37 

6,612 

217.27 

1,472.67 

.0329 

1,885.32 



1923 



$ 100,000.00 


10,000.00 


174,000.00 


17,400.00 


324,888.60 


32,488.86 


13,965.67 


1,396.56 


33,885.42 


93,176.44 


69,062.30 


24,062.30 


9,317.64 


6,906.23 


89,574.99 


2,083.23 


8,957.49 


9,267 


$ 1,518.22 



.044 
1,894.51 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 6; station agents, 2; other station men, 1; enginemen, 
1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 3; section foremen, 2; 
other trackmen, 11; total, 31. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 5; station agents, 2; other 
station men, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; carpenters, 1; other shop- 
men, 2; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 8; total, 26. 

Lost through receivership of Parsons Pulp and Lumber Co., $4,233.83. This amount included 
in above figures. 



ATLANTIC AND CAROLINA RAILROAD 



145 



Atlantic and Carolina Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A. R. Turnbull . . 


Norfolk, Va. 










William J. Jones 

T. A. Hefty . 


Norfolk, Va. 




Kenansville, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

A. R. Turnbull, Norfolk, Va. ; H. D. Williams, Kenansville, N. C. ; Wm. J. Jones, 
Norfolk, Va. ; R. D. Johnson, Warsaw, N. C. ; T. A. Hefty, Kenansville, N. C. ; J. E. 
Jerritt, Kenansville, N. C. ; L. A. Beasley, Kenansville, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized April 21, 1914, under Laws of North Carolina, Chapter 61, Revisal 1905, B. 
Section 2549, Revisal. 





ROAD OPERATED 




Warsaw, N. C, to Kenansville, N. C. 


(miles) 


10 


CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. _. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



1922 



10,000.00 

1,000.00 

46,000.00 

4,600.00 

64,730.00 

6,473.00 

8,295.19 

829 .52 

7,302.52 

30,259.71 

22,606.80 

7,652.91 

3,025.91 

2,260.68 

24,569.00 

2,092.43 

2,456.90 

6,129 

20,924 

3,598.28 

.0363 

694 .28 



1923 



10,000.00 

1,000.00 

40,000.00 

4,000.00 

64,730.00 

6,473.00 

8,295.19 

829 .52 

7,302.52 

21,869.79 

17,074.93 

4,794.86 

2,186.98 

1,707.98 

17,754.03 

1,369.39 

1,775.40 

4,076 

136 .94 

2,746.37 

.0359 

640 .43 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 6; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; other station men, 
1; enginemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; total, 17. 
Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 6; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; other station men, 1; 
enginemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; total, 17. 

Part H— 10 



146 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Atlantic and Western Railroad Company 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. C. Huffer, Jr. 


New York, N. Y. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


H. P. Edwards 

W. R. Sullivan 


Sanford, N. C. 
New York, N. Y. 




H. P. Edwards 


Sanford, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

H. C. Huffer, Jr., 366 Madison Avenue, New York ; J. W. Cunningham, Sanford, N. C. ; 
Louis d'Aillierils, Paris, France ; N. A. Campbell, 366 Madison Avenue, New York ; H. P. 
Edwards, Sanford, N. C. ; W. R. Sullivan, 366 Madison Avenue, New York ; S. A. Boney, 
Goldsboro, N. C. ; J. R. Baggett, Lillington, N. C. ; E. L. Howard, Sanford, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized March 7, 1899, under Laws of North Carolina, Private Laws of North Caro- 
lina, Chapter 363, Session 1899, Chapter 49 of volume 1 of Code of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 




Sanford, N. C, to Lillington, N. C. (miles).. 


24 






CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile -.- 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road - 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment -.. 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina... 



1922 



303,000.00 

12,625.00 

303,000.00 

12,625.00 

557, 734 .90 

23,238.96 

49,431.44 

2,059.64 

25,298.60 

73,916.50 

65,637.23 

8,279.27 

3,079.85 

2,734.88 

62,645.67 

10,520.83 

2,610.24 

23,626 

438 .37 

750 .00 

.036 

2,171.41 



1923 



332,000.00 

13,833.34 

332,000.00 

13,833.34 

558,267.28 

23,261.14 

56,701.67 

2,362.55 

25,623.70 

83,701.70 

82,090.32 

1,611.38 

3,487.57 

3,420.43 

73,952.02 

7,143.13 

3,081.33 

15,066 

297.63 

2,606.55 



.50 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 3; station agents, 5; enginemen, 1; fire- 
men, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 1; section fore- 
men, 2; other trackmen, 12; other employees, 2; total, 38. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 
5; office clerks, 3; station agents, 5; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 3; 
machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 12; other employees, 1; total, 36. 



BLACK MOUNTAIN KAILWAY 



147 



Black Mountain Railway Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




J. Bis Ray 


Burnsville, N. C. 




J. M. Burkholder 


Pensacola, N. C. 















DIRECTORS 

Edward C. Bailey, New York, N. Y. ; I. McQuilkin, Johnson City, Tenn. 
Sanders, Johnson City, Tenn. ; George T. Wofford, Johnson City, Tenn. ; A. 
Johnson City, Tenn. ; J. Bis Ray, Burnsville, N. C. 



; John W. 
B. Crouch, 



HISTORY 

Organized April 21, 1910, under Laws of North Carolina. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 




Eskota, N. C. . .. 


23.39 
2.11 




Spur— Micaville, N. C .-. 


Bowditch, N. C. 


25.5 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock : 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt _ 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. ._ 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources _ 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



50,000.00 


$ 50,000.00 


1,960.78 


1,690.78 


650,000.00 


625,000.00 


25,490.20 


24,509.80 


441,102.21 


441, .476 .61 


17,298.13 


17,312.81 


7,310.28 


7,310.28 


286 .68 


286.68 


17,584.81 


17,599.49 


80,751.25 


104,864.34 


63,009.41 


63,867.22 


17,741.84 


40,997.12 


3,166.72 


4,112.33 


2,470.96 


2,504.60 


69,381.27 


94,458.87 


8,886.38 


8,000.86 


2,720.83 


3,704.27 


19,416 


16,238 


348 .49 


$ 313.76 


2,483.60 


2,404.61 


3.53 


3.59 


2,440.73 


3,236.59 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 2; office clerks, 1; station agents, 3; enginemen, 3; fire- 
men, 3; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 3; other shopmen, 3; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 13; 
other employees, 2; total, 35. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 2; office clerks, 1; station 
agents, 3; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; other shopmen, 3; section fore- 
men, 3; other trackmen, 9; total, 26. 



14S 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Bonlee and Western Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President __ 






General Manager or Superintendent 


M. H. Birkhead— 




Secretary-Treasurer . . . 




Bonlee N C 









Note. — Accounts handled by superintendent; secretary-treasurer inactive. 



DIRECTORS 

Arthur Ross, Asheboro, N. C. ; L. F. Ross, Asheboro, N. C. ; D. B. McCrary, Asheboro, 
N. C. ; J. H. Dunlap, Bonlee, N. C. ; I. H. Dunlap, Bonlee, N. C. ; C. M. Andrews, Bonlee, 
N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized October 12, 1908, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Bonlee, N. C, to Bennett, N. C. (miles). 



10.35 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road. 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



61,700.00 

5,961.35 

57,557.43 

5,560.81 

18,197.17 

1,748.50 

7,309.31 

18,214.86 

15,912.26 

2,302.60 

1,759.86 

1,537.41 

16,675.98 

753.11 

1,611.20 

2,332 

72.76 

785.77 

.32 



61,600.00 

5,951.69 

58,650.52 

5,666.71 

19,444.23 

1,878.66 

7,545.37 

28,456.22 

28,016.64 

439 .58 

2,749.39 

2,796.92 

27,355.68 

322 .50 

2,644.02 

906 

31.06 

2,341.17 

.32 

573.17 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 7; station agents, 2; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; section 
foremen, 1; other trackmen, 3; total, 15. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 6; office clerks, 1; 
station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; 
total, 16. 



CAROLINA RAILROAD 



149 



Carolina Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 



Name 



Official Address 



President 

Superintendent.. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Traffic Manager. 



G. R. Loyall... 

J. C. Poe, 

M. S. Hawkins. 

J. F. George 

J. F. Dalton... 



Xorfolk, Va. 
Kinston, X. C. 
Xorfolk, Va. 
Xorfolk, Va. 
Xorfolk, Va. 



DIRECTORS 

G. R. Loyall, Norfolk, Va. ; W. B. Rodman, Norfolk, Va. ; E. D. Kyle, Norfolk, Va. ; 
M. S. Hawkins, Norfolk, Va. 

HISTORY 

Organized December 11, 1912, under Laws of North Carolina. General Laws of North 
Carolina as set out in Chapter 61 of Pell's Revisal of North Carolina. 







ROAD OPERATED 




Kinston, X". C. 


to Snow Hill, X. C. 




15.228 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capit al st ock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Xet operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

T ot al freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile I 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile... $ 

Revenue from other sources i 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, Xorth Carolina 



35,000.00 


-5 35,000.00 


2,298.40 


2,672.78 


39,000.00 


39,000.00 


2,561.07 


2,978.24 


92,971.68 


93.111.37 


6.105.31 


7,110.45 


915 .00 


915.00 


60.09 


69 .87 


6,165.40 


7,180.33 


52,820.88 


31,504.49 


30,657.00 


22,004.27 


22,163.88 


9,500.22 


3,468.67 


2,068.85 


2,013.20 


1,444.99 


49,502.95 


28,602.01 


2,896.38 


2,136.64 


3,250.78 


1,878.25 


4,819 


3,309 


190 .20 


? 140.31 


421.55 


765 .84 


.03611 


.03639 


1,300.47 


1,320.00 



Employees, 1922: Xumber general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 1; other station men, 
1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; 
total, 18. Employees, 1923: X'umber general officers, 5: office clerks, 2; station agents, 2; enginemen, 
1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 3: total, 17. 



150 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Carolina and Northeastern Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 








Superintendent 




Suffolk, Va. 




G. G. McCann 











DIRECTORS 

H. Stewart Lewis, Suffolk, Va. ; Thomas Philip Hammer, Philadelphia, Pa. ; W. L. 
Long, Roanoke Rapids, N. C. ; Thomas B. Gay, Richmond, Va. ; Walter C. Rawles, New 
York, N. Y. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 8, 1917, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 




Gumberry, N. C., to Lasker, N. C. (miles) 


15 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile - 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile.. 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



300,000.00 


$ 300,000.00 


20,000.00 


20,000.00 


195,500.00 


195,500.00 


13,033.33 


13,033.33 


412,428.34 


412,419.44 


27,495.22 


27,494.63 


19,596.58 


27,485.95 


1,306.44 


1,832.39 


28,801.66 


29,327.02 


27,323.88 


39,953.58 


24,728.12 


29,206.75 


2,595.76 


10,746.83 


1,821.59 


2,663.57 


1,648.51 


1,947.12 


26,949.95 


39,765.51 


272 .09 


156.12 


1,796.66 


2,650.43 


907 


520 


18.14 


S 10.41 


101 .84 


40.95 


.02 


.02 


744 .51 


1,029.97 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 7; office clerks, 2; station agents, 3; enginemen, 1; fire- 
men, 1; conductors, 1; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 18; total, 
37. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 7; office clerks, 2; station agents, 3; enginemen, 1; 
firemen, 1; conductors, 1; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 7; 
total, 27. 



CAKOLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



151 



Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 


Fairfax Harrison 

L. E. Jeffries 

F. S. Wynn 

D. S. Abernethy 

G. E. Mauldin 

E. F. Parham 

L. E. Jeffries 

E. H. Kemper. 


Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 
Washington, D. C. 






Comptroller 


Washington, D. C. 



DIRECTORS 

William A. Barber, New York City, N. Y. ; F. S. Wynn, Washington, D. C. ; Fairfax 
Harrison, Washington, D. C. ; T. H. White, Chester, S. C. ; S. H. Hardin, Chester, S. C. ; 
J. R. Hart, York, S. C. ; L. F. Long, Newton, N. C. ; D. S. Abernethy, Washington, D. C. ; 
A. K. Winget, Gastonia, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Carolina and Northwestern Railway Company, organized July 18, 1895, under the Private 
Laws of North Carolina, 1895, Chapter 190, p. 306; 1901, Chapter 114, p. 301, and the Laws 
of South Carolina, Volume 23, State Act No. 337, p. 567, approved February 17, 1900. 



152 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 3,873,819.24 


Investments: 


$ 3,892,778.30 
978.75 

20.00 
10,307.04 


S 3,897,316.17 


500 .00 




1,389.75 


20.00 


Other investments — 


20.00 


42,128.63 




10,492.28 








3,916,467.87 


3,904,084.09 


3,909,218.20 




Current Assets: 
Cash . 




116,976.79 


116,470.65 

11,768.09 

1,275.23 

17,001.31 

44,558.37 


80,963.54 


7,658.01 

1,669.39 

105,502.41 


Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 


8,240.52 
1,677.17 
8,242.38 


62,326.78 




64,945.67 








294,133.38 


191,073.65 


164,069.28 




Deferred Assets: 




499 .85 


395.10 


395.10 






375.60 










499 .85 


395.10 


770 .70 




Unadjusted Debits: 




68,119.48 






17,934.87 




13,788.78 


15,298.47 








86,054.35 


13,788.78 


15,298.47 








4,297.155.45 


4,109,341.62 


4,089,356.65 









CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



153 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 1,404,250.00 


Stock: 
Capital stock 

Long-term Debt: 


S 1,401,250.00 


S 1,404,250.00 


2,071,000.00 


2,071,000.00 


2,071,000.00 




Current Liabilities: 




497,210.73 


270,270.73 

109,574.52 

44,101.82 

9,371.89 

569,525.00 

100 .00 

2,262.50 


198,870.73 


101,052.49 




82,474.73 


51,505.87 




52,911.06 


11,532.46 




7,253.23 


465,975.00 




673,075.00 


100 .00 




100 .00 


2,262.50 




2,262.50 








1,129,639.05 


1,005,206.46 


1,016,947.25 




Deferred Liabilities: 
Deferred liabilities 

Unadjusted Credits: 




6,242.33 


3,812.30 


3,639.41 


6,519.30 


6,610.00 

2,102.24 

57,159.64 


5,437.04 


5,322.61 






52,545.33 




59,762.48 




Accrued depreciation — miscellaneous physical 






10.38 


40,444.83 




9,255.84 


8,112.77 








91,793.47 


61,907.72 


62,448.59 




Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and surplus 
Profit and loss (balance) . ... ... .. 




1,168.45 
406,937.85 


1,747.73 

438,582.59 


1,747.73 
470,676.33 








405,769.40 


436,834.86 


468,928.60 




Grand totals .. 




4,297,155.45 


4,109,341.62 


4,089,356.65 









154 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



ROAD OPERATED 



Name of Road or Track 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 

Industrial 

Tracks 


Miles'of 

Yard 

Track and 

Sidings, 

Etc. 


Total 




124.30 
9.20 


11.29 


13.62 


149 21 


Trackage rights — Southern Railway 


9.2a 










Totals 


133 .50 


11.29 


13.62 


158 41 







MILES OF ROAD AT CLOSE OF YEAR— BY STATES 



State 


Line 
Owned — 
Main Line 


Line 
Operated 

Under 
Trackage 

Rights 


Total 
Mileage 
Operated 




37.00 
87.30 




37.00 




9.20 


96.50 








124 .30 


9.20 


133 .50 







RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 



1923 



Freight... 

Passenger 

Excess baggage. 
Mail... 



Express 

Milk 

Switching 

Special service train. 



Total rail-line transportation revenue- 



Station, train, and boat privileges. 

Parcel room 

Storage— freight 

Storage— baggage 

Demurrage 

Miscellaneous 



Total incidental operating revenues. 
Joint facility— Cr 

Total railway operating revenues 



666,336.19 

112,792.19 

785 .37 

10,476.34 

14,894.77 

334.60 

5,987.00 

475 .00 



812,081 



300 .00 

55.90 

1,915.30 



4,763.50 
615.25 



7,649.95 



31.47 



819,763.08 



760,474.23 

108,236.62 

817.73 

10,036.12 

13,701.79 

355 .88 

6,936.60 

240 .00 



900,798.97 



300 .00 

48.90 

2,525.82 

40.64 

9,343.50 

632.77 



12,891.63 



217.21 



913,907.81 



CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



155 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES EARNED WITHIN THE STATE 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


On Intrastate Traffic 


On Interstate Traffic 


1922 


1923 


1922 


1923 




$ 176,208.92 

69,301 .29 

449.78 

6,436.73 

9,151.46 

191.63 

4,965.79 

393.96 


$ 372,452.30 

25,962.99 

201.61 

2,991.98 

4,393.84 

85.89 


$ 195,957.47 

62,515.78 

502 .42 

6,166.26 

8,418.48 

218.66 

5,978.10 

240 .00 


$ 430,217.01 




27,828.54 




175.81 


Mail 


2,866.25 




4,041.93 


Milk 


76.51 




















267,039.56 




279,997.17 


465,206.05 










171.81 
46.36 


77.01 


195.32 

45.18 
1,954.71 

37.54 

8,618.00 

586 .44 


61.62 














3,950.85 














352 .35 


157 .93 








Total incidental operating revenue 


4,521.37 




11,437.19 


61.62 








31.47 




217.21 










Total railway operating revenues 


273,240.95 


406,323.55 


291,651.57 


465,267.67 



RAILWAY OPERATING 


EXPENSES- 


-ENTIRE LINE 




Name of Railway Operating Expense 


Account 




Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Maintenance of Way and Strtjctukes: 

Superintendence 


$ 9,636.96 

117,040.64 

25,147.04 

4,698.40 


$ 10,518.32 




126,089 97 




29,923 72 




8,085.49 


Depreciation of way and structures... . __. 


11.70 




256.06 
4,634.38 


167 .75 




5,488.94 














161,413.48 

2,378.73 

161 .20 


180,285 89 




lities- 
ities- 


-Dr. . 




2,683.64 


Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other faci 


-Cr 














Total maintenance of way and structures . 


163,631.01 


182,969.53 













156 



N. C. COKPOEATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES-ENTIRE LINE-Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Repairs of machinery and other apparatus 

Locomotive repairs 

Locomotive depreciation and retirements 

Car repairs 

Car depreciation and retirements 

Work equipment repairs 

Work equipment depreciation and retirements 

Injuries to persons 

Other equipment expenses 

Total maintenance of equipment 

'Traffic: 

Traffic expenses 

Transportation — Rail Line: 

Superintendence and dispatching 

St ation service 

Train enginemen and motormen 

Euel for train locomotives 

Other train locomotive supplies and expenses. 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Injuries to persons - 

Loss and damage 

Other casualty expenses. 

Other rail transportation expenses 

Totals 

'Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr 

Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr 

Total transportation — rail line 

General: 

Administration 

Insurance — general 

Valuation expenses 

Other general expenses 

Total general expenses. 

Grand total railway operating expenses... 



$ 2,902.02 


$ 2,884.75 


921 .40 


2,989.34 


41,943.20 


59,928.65 


2,023.80 


2,671.42 


22,120.25 


26,221.17 


1,984.44 


2,009.52 


370.16 


1,412.20 


653 .25 


426.72 


47.00 


63 .50 


4,257.00 


1,770.20 


76,484.20 


100,377.47 


9,828.35 


10,200.10 


16,340.69 


16,416.99 


117,163.39 


51,437.19 


42,277.28 


48,605.67 


84,226.99 


95,922.22 


10,581.79 


11,473.55 


58,071.36 


67,699.16 


3,239.48 


3,484.94 


6,633.04 


6,495.56 


5,732.64 


3,835.25 


4,856.92 


4,435.19 


3,904.43 


3,129.09 


283,028.01 


312,954.81 


37,604.78 


43,328.63 


2,204.28 


2,013.45 


170.78 


225 .73 


318,599.29 


354,495.72 


35,262.55 


36,030.20 


26.36 


31.90 


234 .98 


180.38 


1,660.40 


1,376.72 


37,184.29 


37,619.20 


605,727.14 


685,662.02 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 73.89 per cent for 1922; 75. 
per cent for 1923. 



CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



157 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 








1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


106 

28 

33 

7 

104 

56 

153 

2 

2,217 

413 

17 

64 

11 

1 

3 

68 


3,638 

669 

719 

118 

1,481 

862 

1,901 

25 

23,247 

7,339 

217 

775 

191 

13 

83 

988 


57 
32 
43 
13 
125 
181 
136 


2,124 




771 




963 




356 




1,535 




2,761 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa.. .. .. 


1,601 






Cotton . . 


2,425 

392 

6 

64 

16 


26,453 




7,107 




83" 




823 




222 








4 
43 


61 




469 






Totals 


3,283 


42,268 


3,537 


45,329 






Animals and Products: 
Horses and mules... .. . 


17 
31 
39 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 


187 
346 
546 
28 
30 
10 
30 
15 


34 

23 

6 

1 
29 


379 


Cattle and calves . 


233 


Hogs . ._ . 


58 


Fresh meats . 


15 


Other packing-house products 


287 


Eggs. . . . . . 




Hides and leather.. ... . . 


9 
6 


70 


Other animals and products 


232 






Totals 


96 


1,192 


108 


1,274 






Products of Mines: 
Bituminous coal ... 


1,178 
10 


59,773 
367 


1,297 

6 

4 

2,136 

6 

53 

53 

1 


60,228 


Coke 


148 


Iron ore 


67 


Clay, gravel, sand, and stone . 


1,487 
66 
49 
50 
29 


54,673 

2,057 

1,926 

1,011 

815 


83,448 


Crude petroleum... . _ 


195 


Asphaltum ..... 


1,880 


Salt 


1,033 


Other products of mines. . 


32 






Totals 


2,869 


120,622 


3,556 


147,032 






Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 


530 

13 

9 

2,369 

73 


12,038 
329 
171 

52,256 
1,231 


757 

49 

5 

2,872 

92 


17,887 


Ties 


1,272 


Pulp wood 


101 


Lumber, timber, boxshooks, staves, and headings 
Other products of forests . 


69,638 
1,459 






Totals 


2,994 


66,025 


3,775 


90,357 







15! 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— Continued 





1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 


532 

4 

107 

11 

1 
49 


14,101 

147 

1,688 

404 

27 

902 


667 

3 

160 

18 

3 

25 

2 

356 

468 

630 

77 

253 

74 

172 

32 

1,352 


17,463 
90 




2,125 




635 




58 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe- 


471 
14 




126 
203 
620 
91 
125 

22 

78 

45 

897 

1 

41 

628 

9 

1 

238 

7 

1,151 


2,010 
7,888 
19,579 
2,030 
2,560 

315 

626 

438 

7,396 

15 

418 

12,347 

143 

15 

2,605 

136 

16,039 


5,685 




17,840 


Brick and artificial stone.. 


25,218 




1,546 




5,688 


Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 


1,016 




918 


Household goods and second-hand furniture 


226 
12,038 








5 

804 
3 
2 

510 


64 


Fertilizers (all kinds) .. .. 


14,499 




56 




24 


Textiles 


5,406 








1,261 


16,790 






Totals... 


4,987 


91,829 


6,877 


127,870 








14,229 


321,936 
49,893 


17,853 


411,862 




51,057 










Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic 


14,229 


371,829 


17,853 


462,979 



CAEOLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



159 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 



Item 


1922 


1923 




133 .50 


133 .50 






Train-miles: 
Freight — 
Ordinary __ 


67,923 
1,170 


93,278 


Light 


940 








69,093 

80,566 

18,696 

142 


94,218 




80,300 


Mixed... 


15,024 




88 






Total transportation service train-miles.. 


168,497 


189,630 








360 


384 






Locomotive-miles: 
Freight — 
Principal . . 


67,923 
1,170 


93,278 


Light 


940 






Total freight locomotive-miles, 


69,093 


94,218 






Passenger — 


80,566 
20 


80,300 


Light . 








Total passenger locomotive-miles 


80,586 


80,300 






Mixed train — principal. . 


18,736 


15,024 








142 


88 






Train switching 


60,329 


77,469 






Total transportation service locomotive-miles... .. 


228,886 


267,099 






Work service 


360 


384 







160 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Item 


1922 


1923 


Car-miles: 
Freight train- 


724,161 
175,065 


882,066 




197,546 






Sum of loaded and empty 


899,226 
67,876 


1,079,612 
94,218 








967, 102 


1,173,830 






Passenger train — 




173,185 






618 


Other 


81,433 


81,583 








247,276 


255,386 






Mixed train- 


70,960 
33,539 
18,768 


41,674 




23,819 




15,024 








23,267 


80,517 






Special train — 


156 


48 




40 




192 


48 








348 


136 








1,338,293 


1,509,869 








1,211 


1,011 






Freight Service: 
Tons— 


371,829 

24,748 


462,919 




30,773 








396,577 


493,692 






Ton-miles — 


12,201,358 
766,625 


15,107,035 




789,980 








12,967,983 


15,897,015 







CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



161 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried — revenue.. 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work- train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues... 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles— freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles— mixed trains 

T on-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 



144,191 
3,089,973 



518 

603 

140 

1 

1,262 

3 

1,715 

8,027 

1,998 

4,991.28 

1,043.32 

6,140.54 

4,537.28 

1,603.26 

91,396 

97,138 

23,146 



10.48 

3.79 

2.53 

1.79 

143.64 

152.67 

3.07 

1.00 

37.04 

7.84 

1.67 

4.87 

3.60 

1.27 



134,818 
2,945,223 



$ 666,336.19 
112,792.19 
139,283.27 


$ 760,474.23 
108,236.62 
133,148.14 


819,763.08 
605,727.14 


913,907.81 
685,662.02 


214,035.94 


228,245.79 



706 

601 

113 

1 

1,420 

3 

2,001 

9,283 

2,027 

696 .44 

997.36 

6,845.75 

5,136.05 

1,709.71 

113,161 

119,079 

22,061 



5, 



9.36- 

2.77 

2.10 

1.59 

141 .93 

149 .35 

3.18 

1.00 

35.44 

7.14 

1.60 

4.82 

3.62 

1.20 



Part 11—11 



162 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 


1922 


1923 


Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles— freight trains „. 


1.00 
14.00 
1.00 
3.07 
1.00 
6.57 
1.00 
2.45 


1.00 




12 46 




1.00 




3.18 




1.00 




5 36 




1 00 




1.55 






Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 


15.35 

16.31 

$ .83803 


16.35 




17.21 




$ .82326 






Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 


16.71 
$ 0.60998 


15.60 




$ .57321 






Miscellaneous Averages: 


32.81 
30.98 
32.70 
21.43 
$ 1 .79205 
.05461 
.78224 
.03650 
73.89 


32.63 




25.67 




32.20 




31.85 




$ 1 .62981 




.05034 




.80284 




.03675 




75.03 







STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE STATE 




Item 


1922 


1923 




96.50 


96.50 






Train-miles: 

Freight— 


50,223 
1,170 


68,970 




940 








51,393 

53,464 

18,696 

142 


69,910 




58,041 




15,024 




88 








123,695 


143,063 








317 


338 







CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



163 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 


Item 


1922 


1923 


Locomotive-miles: 
Freight- 


50,223 
1,170 


68,970 


Light 


940 








51,393 


69,910 






Passenger — 


53,464 
20 


58,041 


Light 








Total passenger locomotive-miles 


53,484 


58.041 








18,736 


15,024 








142 


88 








50,037 


64,253 






Total transportation service locomotive-miles .. 


173,792 


207,316 








317 


338 






Car-miles: 
Freight train — 
Loaded ._ .. ... 


579,329 
140,052 


717,653 


Empty .. _. 


158,037 






Sum of loaded and empty . 


719,381 
54,301 


875,690 




75,375 








773,682 


951,065 






Passenger train — 
Passenger _. _ . 


124,607 


129,889 


Sleeping, parlor, and observation. ... 


618 


Other 


61,075 


61,187 








185,682 


191,694 






Mixed train — 
Freight — loaded 


70,960 
33,539 
18,768 


41,674 


Freight — empty 


23,819 




15,024 






Total mixed train car-miles 


123,267 


80,517 






Special train — 
Passenger .. 




48 


Sleeping, parlor, and observation... 


156 
192 


40 


Otner passenger-train 


48 






Total special train car-miles 


348 


136 






Total transportation service car-miles 


1,082,979 


1,223,412 






Work service 


1,060 


885 







164 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 


Item 


1922 


1923 


Freight Service: 
Tons— 


314,981 
22,026 


392, 139 




27,388 








337,007 


419,527 






Ton-miles — 


10,249,141 
633,156 


12,797,169 




703,083 








10,882,297 


13,500,252 






Passenger Service: 


122,101 
2,616,589 


114,164 




2,494,015 






Revenues and Expenses: 


$ 548,661.22 
95,264.28 
119,167.20 


$ 626, 174.48 




90,344.32 




112,810.64 








679,564.50 
481,389.04 


212,193.15 












198,175.46 








Averages per Mix,e of Road: 


533 

554 

194 

1 

1,282 

3 

1,801 

9,100 

2,122 

$ 5,685.61 

1,234.89 

7,042.12 

4,988.49 

2,053.63 

106,209 

112,770 

27,114 


724 




601 




156 




1 




1,483 




4 




2,148 




10,534 




2,144 




$ 6,488.85 




1,169.02- 


Operating revenues.. _ 


7,843.72 




5,644.83 




2,198.89 




132,613 


Ton-miles — all freight . 


139,899 


Passenger-miles — revenue 


25,845. 







CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



165 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger- miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains. 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles— mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains.. 

Car- miles — special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled— all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers.. 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent) 





11.27 


10.27 




3.80 


2.77 




2.73 


2.26 




1.79 


1.59 




151.92 


155.81 




161.31 


164.37 




3.47 


3.30 




1.00 


1.00 




46.65 


40.99 


$ 


8.13 


$ 7.62 




2.12 


1.85 




5.49 


5.29 




3.89 


3.81 




1.60 


1.48 




1.00 


1.00 




15.05 


13.60 




1.00 


1.00 




3.47 


3.30 




1.00 


1.00 




6.58 


5.36 




1.00 


1.00 




2.45 


1.55 




15.76 


16.85 




16.73 


17.77 


% 


.84372 


$ .82464 




18.25 


17.14 


% 


0.66444 


$ 0.62079 




32.54 


32.63 




28.75 


25.67 




32.29 


32.17 




21.43 


21.85 


$ 


1 .74189 


$ 1 .59682 




.05353 


.04893 




.78021 


.79135 




.03641 


.03622 




70.84 


71.97 



166 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 





Name of State 


Amount Charged to 
Tax Accruals" in 


"Railway 

Income 




1922 


1923 


North Carolina.. . 


$ 16,918.47 
5,271.36 


$ 


23,820.28 


South Carolina 


5,502.32 








Totals 


22, 189 .83 




29,322.60 









U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Kind of Tax 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 




% 932 .02 


% 943 .52 




19.95 


Refund by U. S. Government of income tax paid during years 1918 
and 1919 


10,630.40 








Total U. S. Government taxes .-_ 


11,562.42 


963 .47 








12,491.45 


30,286.07 







CAROLINA AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 



167 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 





1922 


1923 


Class of Employees 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 

Executives, general officers, and assistants 

Division officers, assistants, and staff assistants. .. 


3 

1 


$ 6,000.00 
3,900.00 


3 

1 


$ 6,000.00 
3,900.00 


Totals . 


4 


9,900.00 


4 


9,900.00 






Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments) .. 


1 
1 
19 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


2,160.00 

1,680.00 

25,107.96 

1,500.00 

2,749.92 

1,800.00 

1,800.00 

690 .00 

945 .00 


1 
1 

19 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


2,200.48 
1,680.00 


Clerks (B) 


25,760.26 




1,500.00 




2,749.92 




1,800.00 




1,800.00 


Messengers and office boys .. ... 


690 .00 


Elevator operators and other office attendants 


942 .57 
1,089.00 


Traffic agents, advertising and development agents 


1 
1 


2,240.00 
780 .20 


2,244.00 
781 .04 






Totals— 


4 

27 


6,894.00 
34,563.08 


4 
28 


6,934.48 




36,302.79 






Maintenance of Way and Structures: 


1 

3 

8 

4 

3 

1 

1 

1 

13 

12 

66 

1 


2,100.00 
3,569.50 
8,980.00 
3,191.00 
2,170.78 
472 .03 
350 .26 
1,698.07 

17,310.00 
7,518.03 

35,580.23 

819.43 


1 

2 

5 

3 

3 

1 

1 

2 

13 

24 

54 

1 


2,100.00 




3,546.77 




7,342.09 


Skilled trades helpers... . 


3,327.34 


Regular apprentices. ..... 


1,787.76 


Portable steam equipment operators.. . . .. .. 


484.76 


Portable steam equipment operator helpers 

Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers) 


325 .30 
3,467.55 
18,187.24 


Laborers (extra gang and work-train) ... ... 


15,365.47 




34,626.69 


Maintenance of way laborers (other than track 
and roadway) and gardeners and farmers 


693 .60 


Totals- 
Daily basis... _ 


1 
113 


2,100.00 
81,659.68 


1 

109 


2,100.00 


Hourly basis... 


89,154.57 







168 



N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION 

Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




N. S. Meldrum 


New York, N. Y. 






New York, N. Y. 




J. McQuilkin 












Edward C. Bailly 

John W. Sanders 


New York, N. Y. 


Treasurer. . 












J. McQuilkin .. _ 






L. H. Phetteplaee. .. 






W. C. Hattan 






L. L. Melntyre 









DIRECTORS 

C. Ledyard Blair, New York, N„ Y. ; John B. Dennis, New York, N. Y. ; William W. 
Miller, New York, N. Y. ; T. J. Cunningham, New York, N. Y. ; N. S. Meldrum, New York, 
N. Y. ; Thomas F. Ryan, New York, N. Y. ; W. M. Ritter, Washington, D. C. ; Mortimer M. 
Buckner, New York, N. Y. ; J. W. Pless, Marion, N. C. ; D. B. Wents, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
J. J. Champion, Johnson City, Tenn. 

HISTORY 

1. Exact name of common carrier making this report: Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio 
Railway. 

2. Date of organization : Original charter granted to South and Western Railroad Com- 
pany January 26, 1905. On August 7, 1906, it was amended to increase the capital stock 
to $7,600,000. On March 7, 1908, it was amended to increase the capital stock to $27,000,000 
($15,000,000 preferred and $12,000,000 common) and to change the corporate name to 
Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway. On March 29, 1909, it was amended to provide 
for the construction, maintenance and operation of certain portion of our present line in 
Virginia. On July 26, 1909, it was amended to increase the capital stock from $27,000,000 
to $30,000,000 ($15,000,000 preferred and $15,000,000 common). On May 23, 1912, it was 
amended to provide for the construction, maintenance and operation of a portion of our 
present line in Virginia. On June 3, 1912, it was amended to provide that the capital 
stock, amounting to $30,000,000, should consist of $10,000,000 preferred and $20,000,000 com- 
mon, instead of $15,000,000 preferred and $15,000,000 common, as provided by the amend- 
ment of July 26, 1909. On June 7, 1912, it was amended to increase the capital stock from 
$30,000,000 to $40,000,000 ($15,000,000 preferred and $25,000,000 common). On March 29, 
1916, it was amended to increase the capital stock from $40,000,000 to $50,000,000 ($25,- 
000,000 preferred and $25,000,000 common). 

3. Under the laws of what government, state or territory organized? If more than one, 
name all ; give reference to each statute and all amendments thereof. 

State of Virginia. See also question 6 and answer. 

4. If a consolidated company, name all constituent companies. Give specific reference to 
charter or general laws governing organization of each, and all amendments of same. 

See question 6 and answer. 

5. Date and authority for each consolidation and for each merger. 
See question 6 and answer. 

6. If a reorganized company, give name of original corporation, and refer to law under 
which it was organized and state the occasion for the reorganization. 

The original corporation was chartered by the State Corporation Commission of Virginia, 
on January 26, 1905. The charter was amended March 7, 1908, changing the name to Caro- 
lina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway, and increasing the capital stock. The present concern 
is authorized to operate in the States of Tennessee and North Carolina, as well as Virginia. 
By deed, dated March 31, 1908, the Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway acquired the 



CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



169 



properties, rights and franchises of South and Western Railroad, a corporation organized 
under the laws of the State of Tennessee, by articles of consolidation, dated November 20, 
1906, between South and Western Railroad Company (of Tennessee) and Kingsport Southern 
Railway, and is now operating these properties, etc., in Tennessee. By deed, dated April 16, 
1908, the Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio Railway acquired the properties, rights and franchises 
of the South and Western Railroad Company, a corporation chartered under the laws of the 
State of North Carolina on December 1, 1905, and is now operating these properties, etc., in 
North Carolina. Thus, while the original South and Western Railroad Company (of 
Virginia) was only authorized to operate in Virginia, the Carolina, Clinchfield and Ohio 
Railway is authorized to, and is, operating in Virginia, Tennessee and North Carolina. 

7. State whether or not the respondent during the year conducted any part of its business 
under a name or names other than that shown in response to inquiry No. 1. If so, give 
full particulars. 

None. 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


164,410,447.63 


Investments: 


164,583,218.98 


$ 65,272,798.62 






6,399.36 


17,955.08 




30,425.07 

3,505,513.30 
3,850,000.00 


30,059.25 


3,505,513.30 


Investments in affiliated companies — 


3,501,055.11 


3,869,300.10 




3,325,000.00 






500,000.00 


782,546.71 




900,653.57 
9,000.00 


899,761.34 


9,000.00 












72,594,762.82 


72,878,810.92 


73,535,073.68 




Current Assets: 
Cash 




2,326,158.06 
324,205.00 


2,257,429.16 

64,185.00 

18,596.98 

151,998.50 

5,956.30 

165,110.19 

813,930.39 

1,579,704.35 

336,152.91 


2,394,804.06 
98,975.00 


25,107.08 

242,533.30 

7,707.76 

210,867.72 


Loans and bills receivable 

Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 


2,000.00 

594,075.72 

3,869.61 

220,286.36 


964,562.35 




929,365.54 


1,756,312.04 




1,701,644.69 


247,786.48 




88,153.06 




Total current assets 

Deferred Assets: 




6,105,239.79 


5,393,063.78 


6,033,174.04 


2,581.29 


2,868.90 


4,106.05 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance.. 




10,605.55 
605,154.20 


2,987.70 
600,737.94 


17,985.79 
1,663,241.72 








615,759.75 


603,725.64 


1,681,227.51 








79,318,343.65 


78,878,469.24 


81,253,581.28 









170 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ( 


Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$36,500,000.00 


Stock: 


$36,500,000.00 


$ 36, 500, 000 .oa 




Long-term Debt: 




28,095,000.00 


33,299,000.00 
76,828.77 


33,174,000.00 


390,828.77 




65,315.05 








28,485,828.77 


33,375,828.77 


33,239,315.05 




Current Liabilities: 




6,000,000.00 




1,080,000.00 


199,545.00 




317,624.21 
389,047.27 
938 .38 
174,910.00 
1,000.00 
231,504.98 
137,640.79 


235,375.34 


320,337.87 
8,429.46 


Audited accounts and wages payable 


616,052.44 
339.48 


592,270.35 




59,820.00 


5,000.00 






226,348.30 




422,531.42 


102,011.36 




44,784.02 








7,653,942.34 


1,252,665.63 


2,459,902.70 




Deferred Liabilities: 




1,577.83 


1,823.15 


2,233.57 




Unadjusted Credits: 




84,437.23 


197,991.16 

2,229,354.84 

62,020.32 


204,088.42 


1,815,601.06 




2,594,070.75. 


60,612.85 




40,353.55 








1,960,651.14 


2,489,366.32 


2,838,512.72 




Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and surplus 




37,464.94 
4,678,878.63 


53,816.39 
5,204,968.98 


55,368.17 
6,158,249.07 








4,716,343.57 


5,258,785.37 


6,213,617.24 








79,318,343.65 


78,878,469.24 


81,253,581.28' 









CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



171 



ROAD OPERATED 



Name of Road or Track 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 

Industrial 

Tracks 


Miles of 

Yard 

Track and 

Sidings, 

Etc. 


Total 




255 .97 
10.39 


24.05 


114.81 


394 .83 




10.39 












266.36 


24.05 


114.81 


405.22" 


Leased. .. . 


2.79 


.45 
13.86 
3.12 


4.94 


8.18 


Contract- _. 


13.86 


Trackage rights 


22.05 




25.17 






Totals 


452 .43 


41.48 


119.75 


452 .43 



MILES OF ROAD AT CLOSE OF YEAR— BY STATES 





Line Owned 


Line 

Operated 

Under 

Lease 


Line 
Operated 

Under 
Trackage 

Rights 


Total 


State 


Main 
Line 


Branch 
Lines 


Mileage 
Operated 


Kentucky _. . 






2.79 




2.79 


Virginia . ._ . 


83.77 
55.59 
116.61 


9.60 


21.35 
.70 


114.72 


Tennessee- ... „ 




56.29 


North Carolina... 


.79 




117.40 










Total mileage (single track) 


255 .97 


10.39 


2.79 


22.05 


291.20 



172 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Mail 

E xpress 

Other passenger-train 

Milk 

Switching 

Special service train 

Total rail-line transportation revenue 

Station, train, and boat privileges. 

Parcel room 

Storage — freight 

Storage — baggage 

Demurrage.-- 

Telegraph and telephone 

Rents of buildings and other property 

Miscellaneous _. 

Total incidental operating revenues. . 

Total railway operating revenues 



$ 6,651,872.84 


S 8,137,853.13 


464,354.75 


532,850.54 


1,940.68 


2,211.86 


38,180.30 


37,371.40 


58,164.05 


52,677.77 


1,236.29 


6,290.89 


190 .52 


123.67 


13,531.48 


17,891.00 


810.92 








7,230,281.83 


8,787,270.28 


5,678.84 


5,588.88 


95.70 


119.60 


3,327.79 


3,259.86 


145 .32 


184 .74 


9,742.00 


25,702.00 


9,513.78 


10,135.24 


885 .46 


1,011.73 


3,221.27 


3,552.47 


32,605.16 


49,554.52 


7,262,886.99 


8,836,824.80 



CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



173 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES EARNED WITHIN THE STATE 




Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Freight 


$ 2,793,786.58 

195,028.99 

815 .09 

16,035.73 

24,428.90 

519 .24 

80.02 

526.15 

275.23 


$ 3,255,141.26 




213,140.22 




884 .74 


Mail. 


14,948.56 




21,071.11 


Other passenger-train ... 


2,516.36 


Milk 


49.46 


Switching . __ . 


7,156.40 


Special service train 








Total rail-line transportation revenue.. 


3,031,495.93 


3,514,908.11 






Station, train, and boat privileges.. 


2,385.11 
40.19 

1,395.57 
61.03 

4,091.64 

3,995.79 
371.89 

1,352.93 


2,235.55 


Parcel room. . . 


47.84 


Storage — freight.. . 


1,303.94 


Storage — baggage. ... 


73.90 


Demurrage... . _ 


10,280.80 


Telegraph and telephone. 


4,054.10 


Rents of buildings and other property 


404 .69 


Miscellaneous .. . 


1,420.99 






Total incidental operating revenue. ... .. 


13,694.15 


19,821.81 






Total railway operating revenues _ 


3,045,190.08 


3,534,729.92 







Note. — Separate interstate and intrastate figures not available. 



174 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



"Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence. 

Roadway maintenance — yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Tunnels and subways 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other 

Ties — yard 

Ties— other 

Rails — yard 

Rails— other 

Other track material — yard 

'Other track material — other 

Ballast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing — yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences 

Crossings and signs 

Station and office buildings 

Roadway buildings 

'Water stations 

Fuel stations 

Shops and enginehouses 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Roadway machines 

Small tools and supplies 

Removing snow, ice, and sand 

Assessments for public improvements... 

Injuries to persons 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr. 
.Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Cr.. 

Total maintenance of way and structures 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



31,551.82 
1,489.08 

73,326.78 
3,263.29 



47,134.97 

26.688.32 

153,465.20 

2,685.67 

123,333.93 

5,546.41 

43,552.98 

48.00 

15,250.60 

18,688.66 

211,567.41 

314 .88 

4,548.21 

7,787.04 

14.82 

9,052.40 

6,782.78 

6,788.01 

23,225.23 

690 .76 

4,216.32 

6,699.83 

362 .59 

384 .55 

3,323.33 

2,816.07 

650.15 



834,451.35 
5,631.99 

9,504.27 



830,579.07 



1923 



31,952.96 

2,624.23 

90,158.17 

4,940.15 

239 .30 

48,333.53 

20,630.34 

150,154.47 

2,021.72 

118,974.21 

5,182.08 

32,805.00 

2,336.04 

19,847.81 

26,186.11 

229,942.67 

588.71 

4,113.36 

11,099.71 

1,447.99 

12,263.77 

7,158.14 

10,564.72 

20,187.89 

1,108.37 

6,561.30 

7,916.74 

477.81 



8,539.25 

1,944.31 

1,045.80 

50.00 



881,398.90 
13,892.26 
6,503.99 



1,787.17 



CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



175 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 


—Continued 




Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Maintenance op Equipment: 


$ 44,044.16 

27,842.35 

420,881.08 

105,683.64 


$ 42,564.75 




41,340.86 




627,468.11 




104,513.01 




78,378.90 




625,794.92 

305,150.60 

22,015.20 

31,897.90 

5,927.88 


1,308,392.58 




305,483.25 




7,716.47 




58,653.27 


Passenger-train cars — depreciation 


6,251.24 




985.91 




244 .80 
12,976.05 
4,822.80 
4,944.12 
5,445.04 
1,448.07 
5.39 


50.69 




26,057.51 




5,066.29 




5,936.14 




6,762.92 




3,012.04 












1,619,124.00 


2,628,633.94 






Traffic: 


65,549.61 

140,343.51 

1,459.56 

3,547.35 

4,248.12 

22.56 

19,739.62 


71,774.08 




168,294.02 




1,550.39 




4,285.63 




4,885.25 


Insurance. . _. .... 


5.64 


Stationery and printing.. ... . . . ...... 


19,393.64 








234,910.33 


270,188.65 






Transportation — Rail Line: 

Superintendence.. . 


88,802.43 
40,583.57 
145,057.30 

1,048.38 

8,701.88 
18,991.13 
56,337.28 

2,001.58 
36,804.04 
34,159.36 

2,174.90 
740 .74 

1,046.14 
15,809.25 


90,659.22 


Dispatching trains _ 


42,800.25 


Station employees ._ .. 


150,612.52 


Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus . . 


1,052.96 


Station supplies and expenses. . ... _. . 


10,020.52 


Yardmasters and yard clerks .... 


26,136.16 


Yard conductors and brakemen 


87,662.80 


Yard switch and signal tenders .. ...._.. . 


1,900.12 


Yard enginemen.. ... 


57,294.79 


Fuel for yard locomotives... . .. 


60,803.98 




2,646.63 


Lubricants for yard locomotives .. . .. . 


1,257.11 


Other supplies for yard locomotives 


1,735.68 


Enginehouse expenses — yard 


20,465.44 



176 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Transpoktation— Rail Line— Con. 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives-. 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives... 

Enginehouse expenses— train, 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Crossing protection 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property.. 

Damage to live stock on right of way. 

Loss and damage — freight 

Loss and damage — baggage 

Injuries to persons 



Totals 

Operating joint yards and terminals — pr._ 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr._. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr... 



Total transportation — rail line. 



General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of clerks and attendants. 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Insurance n 

Stationery and printing 

Valuation expenses 

Other expenses 



Total general expenses. 

Transportation for investment — Cr 

Grand total railway operating expenses. 



$ 241 .58 


% 356.58 


336,911.85 


416,296.31 


2,597.61 


2,306.14 


446,729.41 


647,190.96 


19,583.07 


21,843.42 


16,311.01 


19,747.23- 


10,259.29 


13,576.05 


113,473.40 


124,585.03 


306,265.85 


385,169.14 


42,954.64 


59,310.52 


2,223.23 


2,191.65 


895 .86 


1,100.19 


15,832.08 


17,710.92 


466.41 


1,603.62 


486 .00 


506.62 


32,112.30 


27,875.74 


3,854.29 


3,892.2S 


12,106.11 


11,640.60 


40,094.25 


31,706.59 


107 .09 


216.21 


21,910.98 


34,044.23 


1,877,674.28 


2,377,917.21 


10,417.96 


12,379.48 


5,094.44 


2,322.02 


21,439.37 


22,668.70 


4,613.86 


3,898.55 


1,899,823.31 


2,406,744.82 


36,697.02 


35,235.86 


76,522.19 


86,553.82 


20,970.12 


21,171.42 


57,639.93 


62,971.56 


347 .08 


345 .47 


12,558.11 


11,835.84 


1,291.09 


1,750.10 


10,927.82 


7,025.85 


216,953.36 


226,889.92 


3,453.73 


3,497.73 


4,797,936.34 


6,417,746.77 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 72.63 per cent for 1922 



CAKOLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO KAIL WAY 



177 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 



Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




281 .00 


291.20 






Train-miles: 
Freight — 


687,554 
5,278 


868,380 


Light . - 


3,807 








692,832 

320,249 

16,790 

218 


872,187 




321,992 




12,945 












1,030,089 


1,207,124 








38,994 


42,647 






Locomotive-miles : 
Freight — 


692,832 
131,279 
123,036 


872,187 




173,052 


Light 


132,485 






Total freight locomotive-miles . 


947, 147 


1,777,724 






Passenger — 


295,309 
188 


300,811 


Helper 


123 






Total passenger locomotive-miles _ .._ 


295,497 


300,934 






Mixed train — principal . . __ . 


16,790 


12,945 






Special — principal _ _ 


218 








Train switching 


147,735 


158,922 






Yard switching — freight 


183,741 


267,524 




Total transportation service locomotive-miles . 


1,591,128 


1,918,049 






Work service 


38,994 


42,467 





Part 11—12 



178 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Car-miles: 
Freight train — 


20,969,034 
13,607,047 


27,857,996 




16,892,424 








34,576,081 

693,023 

15,101 


44,750,420 




874, 146 




45,488 








35,284,205 


45,670,054 






Passenger train — 


694,923 


728,432 




142,878 


Other .-- 


389,023 


390,457 








1,083,946 


1,261,767 






Mixed train — 


33,540 
17,951 
5,110 
16, 790 
11,680 


11,368 




3,289 




4,172 




12,940 




11,680 








85,071 


43,449 






Special train — 


2,398 
872 














3,270 










36,456,492 


46,975,270 








141,704 


180,015 






Freight Service: 
Tons— 


5,572,317 
219,391 


6,913,124 




292,756 








5,791,708 


7,205,880 






Ton-miles — 


820,762,431 
24,932,717 


1,009,014,212 




34,242,610 








845,695,148 


1,043,256,822 







179 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Passenger Service: 


566,984 
13,171,404 


601,113 




15,231,167 






Revenues and Expenses: 


i 6,651,872.84 
464,354.75 
564,066.59 


$ 8,137,853.15 




532,850.54 


Passenger service train revenue ... 


631,526.13 








7,262,886.99 
4,797,936.34 


8,836,824.80 




6,417,746.77 








2,464,950.65 


2,419,078.03 






Averages per Mile of Road: 


2,465 

1,140 

60 

1 

3,666 

139 

5,662 

125,777 

3,962 

% 23,672.15 

2,007.35 

25,846.57 

17,074.51 

8,772.06 

2,920,863 

3,009,591 

46,873 


2,995 




1,106 




44 






Transportation service train-miles ... 


4,145 


Work-train miles.. . . 


146 


Locomotive-miles— transportation 


6,587 


Freight service car- miles 


156,899 




4,418 




$ 27,945.92 




2,168.70 


Operating revenues 


30,346.24 


Operating expenses 


22,038.97 


Net operating revenues . 


8,307.27 


Ton-miles— freight service 


3,465,021 


Ton-miles — all freight. 


3,582,613 


Passenger-miles — revenue 


52,243 






Averages per Train-mile — 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 


30.27 

2.00 

19.64 

1.07 

1,165.85 

1,201.27 

3.38 

1.70 

40.42 

S 9.45 

1.73 

7.05 

4.66 

2.39 


31.94 


Loaded freight car- miles — mixed trains 


.88 


Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 


19.37 


Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 


.25 


Ton-miles — revenue freight 


1,149.48 


Ton-miles — all freight 


1,188.49 


Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 


3.92 


Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains. 


1.90 


Revenue passenger-miles 


46.19 


Freight revenue 


I 9.27 


Passenger service train revenue . 


1.92 


Operating revenues . 


7.32 


Operating expenses 


5.32 


Net operating revenues 


2.00 







180 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Averages per Locomotive-mile: 
Train-miles — freight trains . ... 


.73 
37.25 
1.00 
3.58 
1.00 
5.07 
1.00 
15.00 


74 


Car-miles — freight trains .__ 


38.78 


Train-miles — passenger trains _. 


1.00 


Car-miles— passenger trains . ... 


4.12 


Train-miles — mixed trains 


1 00 


Car-miles — mixed trains _. ._ 


3.36 


Train-miles — special trains. . . 




Car-miles — special trains . ._ 








Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 
Ton-miles — revenue freight. 


39.08 

40.27 

$ 0.31672 


36.21 


Ton-miles — all freight 


37.43 




$ .29200 






Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 
Passenger-miles — revenue 


18.51 
$ 0.65245 


17.20 




$ 0.60260 






Miscellaneous Averages: 
Miles hauled — revenue freight , 


147.29 
113.65 
146.02 

23.23 
$ 1.19374 
.00810 
.81899 
.03525 

66.06 


145 .96 




116.97 




144 .78 




25.31 




% 1.17716 


Revenue per ton-miles of freight . 


.00807 




.88644 




.03503 




72.63 







STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE 



Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




117.40 


117.40 






Train-miles: 
Freight — 


286,897 
1,342 


369,651 


Light 


1,006 








288,239 

84,637 

74 


370,657 




84,193 












372,950 


454,850 








15,028 


19,313 







CAROLINA, CLLNCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



181 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Contim 


ed 


Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Locomotive-miles : 
Freight — 


283,239 
49,460 
48,083 


370,657 




57,054 


Light 


55,428 








385,782 


483,139 






Passenger — 


84,637 

172 


84,193 




115 








84,809 


84,308 








74 










28,809 


33,520 








499,474 


600,967 








15,028 


19,313 






Car-miles: 


9,132,612 
6,449,539 


11,829,502 




7,810,659 








15,876,954 

288,212 

6,591 


19,640,161 




369,567 




22,819 








15,876,954 


20,032,547 






Passenger train — 


203,510 


207,483 




64,285 


Other 


93,916 


92,381 








297,426 


364,149 






Special train — 


814 
296 














1,110 










16,175,490 


20,396,696 








68,563 


89,053 







182 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 


Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Freight Service: 
Tons— 


3,744,336 
92,144 


5,297,562 




119,702 








3,836,480 


5,417,264 






Ton-miles — 


344,720,221 
10,471,741 


403,605,685 




13,697,044 








355,191,962 


417,302,729 






Passenger Service: 


238,133 
' 5,531,990 


240,445 




6,085,267 






Revenues and Expenses: 


$ 2,793,786.58 
195,028.99 
236,907.97 


$ 3,255,141.26 




213,140.22 




252,610.45 








3,045,190.08 
1,853,179.14 


3,534,729.92 




2,318,120.50 








1,192,010.94 


1,216,609.42 






Averages per Mile op Road: 


2,455 

721 

1 

3,177 

128 

4,254 

135,245 

2,536 

$ 23,797.16 

2,017.96 

25,938.59 

15,785.17 

10,153.42 

2,936,288 

3,025,485 

47,121 


3,157 




717 








3,874 




165 




5,119 




170,635 




3,102 




S 27,726.93 




2,151.71 




30,108.43 




19,745.49 




10,362.94 




3,437,868 




3,554,538 




51,834 







CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



i8a 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Ton- miles — revenue freight _. 

Ton-miles — all freight _ 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Revenue passenger-miles. . 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train- miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train- miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles— special trains 

Car-miles— special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton- miles — revenue freight . . 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger. 

Revenue per passenger-mile.. 

Operating ratio (per cent)... 



Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


31.68 




31.91 


22.38 




21.07 


1,195.95 




1,088.89 


1,232.28 




1,125.85 


3.51 




4.33 


65.36 




72.28 


$ 9.69 


$ 


8.78 


2.80 




3.00 


8.17 




7.77 


4.97 




5.10 


3.20 




2.67 


.75 




.77 


41.16 




41.46 


1.00 




1.00 


3.51 




4.32 


1.00 






15.00 








37.75 




34.12 


38.89 




35.28 


$ 0.30591 


$ 


0.27517 


27.18 




22.39 


$ .95833 


$ 


0.78427 


92.06 




76.19 


113.65 




114.43 


92.58 




77.03 


23.23 




25.31 


$ 0.74614 


$ 


0.61446 


.00810 




.00807 


.81899 




.88644 


.03525 




.03504 


60.86 




65.58 



184 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 



Commodity 



1922 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



1923 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



Products of Agriculture: 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats -. 

Other grain 

Flour and meal 

Other mill products 

Hay, straw, and alfalfa 

Tobacco 

Cotton 

Cotton seed and products, except oil- 
Citrus fruits 

Other fresh fruits 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Dried fruits and vegetables 

Other products of agriculture 



Totals. 



Animals and Products: 

Horses and mules 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep and goats 

Hogs 

Fresh meats 

Other packing-house products- 
Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 

Hides and leather 

Other animals and products.. - 



Totals. 



Products of Mines: 

Bituminous coal 

Coke 

Iron ore 

Other ores and concentrates... 

Base bullion and matte 

Clay, gravel, sand, and stone. 

Crude petroleum 

Asphaltum 

Salt 

Other products of mines 



Totals. 



216 
246 

13 

1,329 

842 

2,277 

62 
372 

66 
299 
332 
265 
125 

44 

35 



24,326 

6,423 

5,877 

378 

23,309 

16,097 

28,374 

648 

4,802 

1,066 

4,833 

5,196 

4,453 

1,661 

866 

581 



7,217 



128,890 



19 

137 



42 
166 
24 



216 

795 

76 

203 

2,198 

1,480 

19 

102 

479 

3,593 

560 



593 



9,721 



76,649 
66 



3,821,062 
2,160 
4,709 



7,940 

3 

29 

1,039 

3,634 



406,902 

99 

992 

22,717 

135,960 



896 
439 
332 

38 

1,378 

1,245 

3,675 

231 

109 

71 

82 
205 
335 
105 

23 



9,252 



43 
78 
4 
15 
110 
87 



o 

61 

203 

41 



650 



84,318 

992 

147 

1 

1 

9,978 

1 

27 

1,072 

5,195 



),450 



4,394,618 



101,762 



5,068,482 



CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



185 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— Continued 






1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Forests: 


3,616 

471 

1,633 

9,587 

907 


88,893 
13,338 
37,545 
237,901 
18,547 


9,467 

830 

2,777 

17,059 

1,182 


238,537 


Ties . 


21,915 


Pulp wood ... _ . 


66,175 


Lumber, timber, boxshooks, staves, and headings. 


438,966 
21,795 






Totals 


16,214 


396,224 


31,315 


787,388 






Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products. 


413 

3 

125 

30 

247 

574 

7 

269 

5,403 

3,186 

792 

177 

240 

4,416 

108 

172 

27 

133 

329 

38 

410 

383 

139 

4,309 


10,400 

57 

2,707 

2,188 

9,745 

13,915 

129 

4,837 

189,806 

104,069 

20,222 

3,372 

3,477 
30,336 

828 
1,305 

357 
1,716 
7,596 

757 

9,626 

4,290 

2,784 

86,023 


479 

2 

99 

152 

270 

1,125 

8 

709 

6,114 

3,538 

1,029 

267 

563 

9,048 

160 

490 

56 

156 

346 

95 

539 

868 

191 

7,368 


11,485 




46 




1,987 




6,824 




11,101 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 


28,751 
164 




14.256 


Cement.. ... 


216,825 


Brick and artificial stone 


123,192 


Lime and plaster . . 


26,947 


Sewer pipe and drain tile . . 


5,934 


Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 
automobiles ... . . ....... .. 


7,164 


Automobiles and auto trucks. ... 


63,506 


Household goods and second-hand furniture 

Furniture (new). .. .... . 


1,303 
3,775 


Beverages .... ... 


869 


Ice ... 


2,069 


Fertilizers (all kinds) .... 


7,905 


Paper, printed matter, and books... . _ 


1,947 


Chemicals and explosives.. . . . 


13,198 


Textiles 


11,170 


Canned goods (all canned food products). . 


3,953 


Other manufactures and miscellaneous . . . 


151,292 






Totals 


21,930 


510,522 


33,672 


715,608 






Grand totals, carload traffic . . 


135,404 


5,440,045 
132,272 


176,651 


6,751,180 


Merchandise— all L. C. L. freight .. ... 


161,944 










Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic 


135,404 


5,572,317 


176,651 


6,913,124 



186 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 


-WITHIN THE STATE 






1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


455 
108 
100 

31 

1,083 

699 

1,688 

46 
433 

27 

59 
464 
236 
126 
124 

17 


16,576 

2,985 

2,586 

735 

17,680 

14,440 

22,188 

586 

5,560 

447 

947 

8,010 

4,109 

1,669 

421 

281 


601 

204 

156 

18 

1,039 

719 

3,601 

229 

104 

68 

82 

171 

221 

76 

13 

62 


21,530 




6,535 


Oats 


3,692- 




533 




17,113 




13,529 




44,908 




2,23& 




1,399 




1,116 




1,156 




2,728 




3,954 




1,094 




22a 




1,002 






Totals. 


5,596 


99,220 


7,364 


122,745 






Animals and Products: 


24 
27 

2 

13 

15 

144 

6 
52 
46 

5 


318 
301 
36 
129 
237 

2,313 
147 
577 

1,086 
126 


23 

45 

3 

9 

96 

82 

5 

47 

30 

13 


248 




463 




18 




84 




1,422 




1,070' 




63 




584 




515 




323 






Totals 


334 


5,270 


353 


4,790 






Products of Mines: 


55,905 

1 

55 

13 

1,993 

13 

827 

1,920 


2,939,940 

28 

2,730 

785 

81,996 

390 

18,023 

69,922 


76,441 
421 
102 


3,882,500 


Coke 


14,497 




5,557 








3,154 

16 

867 

4,057 


134,875 




489 


Salt 


18,564 




159,398 








60,727 


3,113,814 


85,058 


4,215,880 







CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



187 






REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR-WITHIN THE STATE-Continued 




1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Forests: 

Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood 

Ties- -- 


1,929 
216 
170 

6,331 
190 


39,788 

6,457 

4,177 

170,929 

3,196 


6,316 

277 

1,270 

10,257 

483 


153,248 

6,664 


Pulp wood.. -.. 

Lumber, timber, box snooks, staves, and headings. 


30,056 
272,393 

7,491 






Totals -- 


8,836 


224,547 


18,603 


469,852 






Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 


311 

1 

90 

43 

162 

208 

13 

47 

3,177 

808 

360 

6 

190 

3,430 

43 

68 
8 


8,086 

30 

1,884 

1,559 

7,368 

4,800 

372 

800 

113,065 

26,887 

10,323 

136 

4,366 

21,516 

391 

498 

123 


381 

2 

72 

51 

200 

899 

7 

584 

3,813 

1,279 

491 

148 

312 

8,423 

64 

287 

46 

28 

224 

53 

237 

638 

131 

3,723 


10,040 




46 


Sugar, syrup, glucose, and molasses 


1,444 
2,501 




9,051 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 


23,149 
157 




11,761 




139,281 




44,417 




13,614 




2,846 


Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 


4,231 




74,707 


Household goods and second-hand furniture 


498 
2,225 




711 


Ice - .- 


26a 




240 

33 

218 

101 

70 

2,876 


5,196 

647 

6,379 

1,557 

1,553 

55,832 


5,963 




1,087 




6,105 


Textiles 


7,666 




2,729 




68,885 






Totals. . 


12,503 


273,368 


22,093 


433,377 








87,996 


3,716,219 
28,117 


133,471 


5,246,644 




50,918 










Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic 


87,996 


3,744,336 


133,471 


5,297,562 



188 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 







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189 









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190 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 





Name of State 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 3,925.30 
124,739.95 
91,147.45 
187,647.06 


$ 2,952.24 




135,011.88 


Tennessee . 


112,298.30 


North Carolina 


204,526.79 


Florida. 


6.43 


Georgia 




3.10 










Totals 


407,459.76 


454,798.74 







U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Kind of Tax 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 1,782.50 

1,307.48 

136,308.80 


$ 3,963.50 




1,661.59 




121,069.33 








139,398.78 


126,694.42 








546,858.54 


581,493.16 







CAROLINA, CLINCHFIELD AND OHIO RAILWAY 



191 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 








1922 


1923 


Class of Employees 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 

Executives, general officers, and assistants 

Division officers, assistants, and staff assistants... 


20 
3 


$ 119,406 
12,957 


21 
4 


$ 120,351 
17,606 


Totals . . 


23 


132,363 


25 


137,957 






Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 


2 
3 

1 

2 
11 

8 

1 

96 

26 


5,028 

4,617 

1,485 

7,200 

27,169 

16,441 

2,387 

160,715 

31,675 


2 

2 

1 
2 
11 

8 

1 

111 

29 
1 
4 

26 
2 
3 

2 

1 


5,154 


Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 
ants (B) 


2,754 


Subprofessional engineering and laboratory as- 


1,495 


Professional and subprofessional legal assistants.. 
Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments). . 
Chief clerks (minor departments) and assistant 


7,200 
27,914 

16,502 




2,572 


Clerks (B) 


179,918 


Clerks (C) 


34,466 




1,130 




4 

23 

1 

3 

2 

5 
5 

1 
33 

1 
2 

7 


8,052 

32,211 

3,700 

6,804 

2,012 
2,400 
8,500 
1,025 
86,079 
2,868 
4,767 
6,508 


8,688 




35,082 




5,100 




6,973 


Telephone switchboard operators and office assist- 
ants.. _ _. . 


2,126 


Messengers and office boys .. 


444 








1 

37 

1 

2 

7 


1,007 


Traffic agents, advertising and development agents 


96,334 
2,868 


Real estate and tax agents and investigators 


4,800 
6,569 






Totals- 
Daily basis . 


71 
166 


164,858 
256,785 


70 
184 


172,438 




276,658 







192 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION— Continued 



Class of Employees 



1922 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



1923 



Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 



Compen- 
sation 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Roadmasters and general foremen 

Supervising maintenance of way inspectors and 

scale inspectors 

Bridge and building gang foremen 

Bridge and building carpenters 

Bridge and building painters 

Masons, bricklayers, plasterers, and plumbers 

Skilled trades helpers 

Portable steam equipment operators 

Portable steam equipment operator helpers 

Pumping equipment operators 

Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers) 
Gang foremen (bridge and building, signal and 

telegraph laborers) 

Gang or section foremen 

Laborers (extra gang and work-train) 

Track and roadway section laborers 

Maintenance of way laborers (other than track 

and roadway) and gardeners and farmers 

General foremen and supervising inspectors (sig- 
nal, telegraph, and electrical transmission) 

Gang foremen (signal and telegraph skilled trades 

labor) 

Signalmen and signal maintainers 

Linemen and groundmen 



Totals- 
Daily basis... 
Hourly basis. 



15 

7 
1 
7 
4 

4 

50 

71 

243 



% 10,020 

2,244 

5,763 

14,900 

495 

159 

17,452 

9,716 

809 

5,584 

6,668 



67,350 
58,787 
181,805 

27,211 

3,000 

1,969 
9,586 

487 



4 
453 



13,020 
416,993 



4 
483 



10,020 

2,259 
9,781 
24,965 
3,261 
156 
11,008 
11,316 
1,502 
7,577 
7,935 

5,549 

70,531 

70,070 

211,500 

34,618 

3,000 

1,233 

7,080 

349 



13,020 
480,690 



CLIFFSIDE RAILROAD 



193 



Cliffside Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 






Cliffside, N. C. 




Walter H. Haynes 


Cliffside, N. C. 




Cliffside, N. C. 




G. C. Shuford 


Cliffside, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

Charles H. Haynes, Cliffside, N. C. ; Walter H. Haynes, Cliffside, N. C. ; Z. O. Jenkins, 
Cliffside, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized 1905, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Cliffside, N. C, to West Henrietta and Avondale, N. C. (miles). 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue (estimated) 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina (State, $117.76; county, $215.97).. 



16,000.00 


$ 80,000.00 


3,200.00 


16,000.00 


18,285.59 


29,552.29 


3,657.12 


5,910.46 


114,542.40 


134,971.14 


22,908.48 


26,994.23 


3,000.00 


13,000.00 


600 .00 


2,600.00 


23,508.48 


29,594.23 


31,221.52 


45,875.82 


25,110.08 


39,736.72 


6,111.44 


6,139.10 


6,244.30 


9,175.16 


5,022.02 


7,947.34 


29,876.29 


44,495.38 


313.80 


165.05 


5,975.26 


8,899.08 


4,200 


2,000 


68.76 


$ 33.01 


1,001.43 


1,215.39 


.03 


.03 


333 .73 


333 .73 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; enginemen, 2; fire- 
men, 2; conductors, 1; machinists, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; total, 17. Employees, 1923: 
Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 1; 
machinists, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; total, 17. 



Part II— 13 



194 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Dover and Southbound Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President _ ______ _ _ __ 


W. A. Wimsatt 


Washington, D. C. 
Dover, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent.. 


D. W. Richardson 


Secretary-Treasurer. ______ 


W. B. H. Blandford . 


Dover, N C 




N. S. Richardson 


Dover N C 









DIRECTORS 

W. A. Wimsatt, W. C. Wimsatt, W. K. Wimsatt, G. P. Lohr, of Washington, D. C. ; D. W. 
Richardson, N. S. Richardson, B. H. Thomason, W. B. H. Blandford, of Dover, N. C. ; T. D. 
Warren, New Bern, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized December 1, 1918, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Dover, N. C, to Richlands, N. C. (miles). 



24.6 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



100,000.00 

4,065.45 

150,968.00 

6,136.59 

28,641.81 

1,164.26 

7,300.00 

57,289.57 

43,697.60 

13,591.97 

2,328.85 

1,776.33 

49,902.69 

7,386.88 

2,028.55 

300 .30 



1,818.13 



100,000.00 

4,040.40 

164,040.98 

6,587.88 

22,250.81 

899 .00 

7,486.88 

50,670.87 

37,261.70 

13,409.17 

2,047.28 

1,505.48 

33,857.51 

5,361.15 

1,367.96 

216.60 

11,452.21 

2,124.17 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 5; station agents, 2; other station men, 1; conductors, 1; 
total, 9. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 1; station agents, 2; other station 
men, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 3; carpenters, 1; other 
shopmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 6; total, 25. 



DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



195 



Durham and Southern Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




B. N. Duke 


Durham, N. C. 






Charlotte, N. C. 






Durham, N. C. 




W. C. Parker 


Durham, N. C. 






Durham, N. C. 




W. H. Smith 


Durham, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

B. N. Duke, Durham, N. C. ; C. McD. Carr, Durham, N. C. ; J. S. Cobb, Durham, N. C. 
J. B. Mason, Durham, N. C. ; H. C. Satterfield, Durham, N. C. ; C. C, Thomas, Durham, N. C. 
S. H. Reams, Durham, N. C. ; R. L. Lindsay, Durham, N. C. ; J. S. Hill, Durham, N. C. 
J. Harper Erwin, East Durham, N. C. ; W. A. Erwin, West Durham, N. C. ; W. A. Erwin 
Jr., Duke, N. C. ; E. Thomason, Charlotte, N. C. ; W. C. Parker, Durham, N, C. 



HISTORY 

Durham and Southern Railway Company, organized January 13, 1904. Chartered under the 
laws of North Carolina, Chapter 49, Vol. I, and amended March 10, 1905. 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 1,482,840.45 


Investments: 
Investment in road and equipment _ . 


$ 1,446,294.47 

18,237.29 

8,300.00 

295,680.00 


$ 1,445,628.77 


8,639.41 


Miscellaneous physical property- 


18,237.29 


8,300.00 
204,047.90 


Investments in affiliated companies — stocks 

Other investments — stocks 


8,300.00 
123,200.00 




Total investments 




1,703,827.76 


1,768,511.76 


1 595 366 06 




Current Assets: 




154,808.11 


140,826.70 

124,651.00 

5,733.43 

21,790.91 

70,717.84 

484 .65 

15,393.97 


124,836.76 
451.931 38 


602,908.22 


Loans and bills receivable. . 




Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 
Miscellaneous accounts receivable.. 


11 049 53 


14,834.13 


20,016 79 


53,825.91 


Material and supplies... 


72,391.45 








14,067.08 


Other current assets. . . 


17,786.28 




Total current assets.. 




840,443.45 


379,598.50 


698,012.19 




Deferred Assets: 
Deferred assets 


19,327.11 








Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance. . 
U. S. Government unadjusted debits 








2,612.34 


3,704.92 


260,278.08 




Total unadjusted debits 






260,278.08 


2,612.34 


3,704.92 




Grand totals ... .. . 




2,823,876.40 


2,150,722.60 


2,297,083.17 







196 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— 


Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 1,350,000.00 


Stock: 


$ 1,350,000.00 


$ 1,350,000.00 




Current Liabilities: 




677,191.21 


62,488.50 

4.58 

8,227.72 

804 .25 


93,187.72 


4.61 




20 .58, 












10,193.27 








677,195.82 


71,525.05 


103,401.57 




Deferred Liabilities: 




12,567.17 








Unadjusted Credits: 






11,185.06 


24,638.81 

8,576.82 

82,696.31 


21,210.71 


8,576.82 




8,576.82 


68,071.67 




84,914.77 


189,434.98 






79.59 
















277,348.12 


115,911.94 


114,702.30 




Corporate Surplus: 




506,765.29 


613,285.61 


728,979.30 








2,823,876.40 


2,150,722.60 


2,297,083.17 









ROAD OPERATED 



Name of Road or Track 


Termini Between Which 
Road Named Extends 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 

Yard 

Track and 

Sidings, 

Etc. 


Total 


Durham and Southern Ry. Co 


East Durham to Dunn 

Durham to East Durham.. 


56 87 
2.10 


8.44 


65.31 
2.10 








Totals . 


58.97 


8.44 


67.41 









DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



197 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 




1922 


1923 




$ 457,456.86 

38,168.44 

96.70 

5,325.91 

3,425.11 

7,056.70 


1 527,622.89 




33,579.27 




100.65 


Mail 


6,400.62 




4,191.73 




6,551.70 








511,529.72 


578,446.86 








1,039.70 

2,917.54 

500.74 

152.69 


1,073.11 




3,054.00 




509 .87 




228 .03 








4,610.67 


4,865.01 








183.88 


142.43 








516,324.27 


583,454.30 







RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES EARNED WITHIN THE STATE 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Mail 

Express 

Switching 

Total rail-line transportation revenue 

Storage— freight. 

Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone.. 

Miscellaneous 

Total incidental operating revenue. .. 

Joint facility — Cr 

Total railway operating revenues 



$ 457,456.86 

38,168.44 

96.70 

5,325.91 

3,425.11 

7,056.70 


$ 527,622.89 

33,579.27 

100.65 

6,400.62 

4,191.73 

6,551.70 


511,529.72 


578,446.86 


1,039.70 

2,917.54 
500.74 
152.69 


1,073.11 

3,054.00 

509 .87 

228 .03 


4,610.67 


4,865.01 


183.88 


142 .43 


516,324.27 


583,454.30 



198 



N. C. CORPOEATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence 

Maintaining roadway and track 

Maintaining track structures. 

Maintaining ancillary structures 

Injuries to persons 

Other way and structures expense 



Totals 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr. 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Cr.. 

Total maintenance of way and structures 



Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence 

Repairs of machinery and other apparatus 

Locomotive repairs 

Locomotive depreciation and retirements 

Car repairs 

Car depreciation and retirements 

Work equipment repairs 

Work equipment depreciation and retirements 

Miscellaneous equipment repairs 

Miscellaneous equipment depreciation and retirements. 

Injuries to persons 

Other equipment expenses 



Totals 

Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Dr. 
Maintaining joint equipment at terminals — Cr.. 



Total maintenance of equipment. 

Traffic: 
Traffic expenses 



5,166.26 
50,094.87 

2,980.76 

12,866.44 

226 .50 

4,277.32 



75,612.15 

7,454.81 

164.73 



82,902.23 



4,426.61 

2,880.44 

16,667.01 

3,253.92 

14,079.48 

2,259.01 

329.91 

436 .92 

176.81 

2,415.86 

96.85 

829 .83 



47,852.65 
1,919.94 



46,699.79 



15,953.06 



6,284.01 
61,436.89 
8,079.39 
6,719.83 
101 .29 
4,052.21 



1,673.62 

1,809.71 

138.17 



95,345.16 



5,900.02 

2,999.71 

30,947.97 

3,253.92 

7,864.51 

991.19 

613 .48 

436.92 

3.00 

399 .96 

252 .64 

566.20 



54,229.52 
1,687.13 

278.78 



55,637.87 



15,891.41 



DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



199 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



T/KANSPORTATION— RAIL LlNE: • 

Superintendence and dispatching, 

Station service 

Other yard employees 

Other yard expenses 

Train enginemen and motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives 

Other train locomotive supplies and expenses. 

Trainmen 

Train supplies and expenses 

Injuries to persons 

Loss and damage 

Other casualty expenses 

Other rail transportation expenses 



Totals 

Operating joint yards and terminals — Dr. 
Operating joint yards and terminals — Cr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Dr.. 
Operating joint tracks and facilities — Cr.. 



Total transportation— rail line. 

General: 

Administration 

Insurance — general... 

Other general expenses 



Totals 

General joint facility expenses — Dr.. 
General joint facility expenses— Cr.. 



Total general expenses 

Grand total railway operating expenses. 



7,181.75 

23,613.89 

832 .59 

427.29 

11,448.01 

35,884.00 

6,224.44 

17,022.32 

3,706.07 

456.00 

1,944.00 

940.64 

1,916.98 



111,597.98 

47,373.40 

427.72 

5,775.89 

242.36 



164,932.63 



52,796.16 

14.64 

9,776.22 



62,587.02 
62.83 



62,649.85 



373,137.56 



8,702.63 

24,021.41 

914.09 



12,342.36 

35,883.92 

6,061.51 

17,676.43 

3,058.33 

721.23 

6,316.74 

1,301.83 

1,790.74 



118,716.92 

46,616.33 

2,157.95 

167.63 

.33 



163,416.90 



43,746.96 

14.64 

2,144.48 



45,906.08 
76.97 
53.33 



46,036.38 



376,434.18 



Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 72.26 per cent for 1922; 64.51 



per cent for 1923 



200 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE 



Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




58.97 


58.97 






Train-miles: 


82,100 


81,045 










450 








Locomotive-miles: 


82,310 


81,045 










450 








Car-miles: 
Mixed train — 


674,436 
154,564 
156,248 


581,271 




136,089 




73,474 








985,248 


790,834 










1,860 








Freight Service: 


320,774 


186,929 








11,656,574 


9,577,788 






Passenger Service: 


44,621 
981,418 


48,823 




1,061,320 






Revenues and Expenses: 


$ 527,622.89 
33,579.27 
44,272.27 


$ 457,456.86 




38,168.44 




47,016.16 








583,454.30 
376,434.18 


516,324.27 




373,137.56 






Net operating revenues , 


207,020.12 


143,186.71 







DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



201 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 Amount, 1923 



Averages per Mile of Road: 

Mixed-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles. 
Locomotive-miles — transportation. 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger-miles— revenue 



Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains.. 
Empty freight car- miles — mixed trains.. 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains. 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains 



Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue f rei ght 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue ... 



Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 



Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers. 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight... 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent) 



1,392 
1,392 



14,057 

2,649 

8,947.31 

750.75 

9,894.08 

6,383.48 

3,510.60 

197,669 

197,669 

16,642 



8.21 

1.88 

141.98 

141.98 

1.90 

11.95 

6.42 

.54 

7.10 

4.58 

2.52 



11.96 



1,374 

1,374 

1,374 

12,164 

1,246 

7,757.45 

797.28 

8,755.71 

6,327.58 

2,428.12 

162,417 

162,417 

17,997 



7.17 

1.67 

118.17 

118.17 

.90 

13.09 

5.64 

.58 

6.37 

4.60 

1.76 



1.00 





17.28 




16.47 




17.28 




16.47 


$ 


0.78231 


$ 


0.78699 




6.28 




14.44 


$ 


0.21491 


$ 


0.51948 




36.34 




51.23 




36.34 




51.23 




21.99 




21.73 


$ 


1 .64484 


$ 


2 .44722 




.04526 




.04776 




.75254 




.78177 




.03421 




.03596 




61.51 




72.26 



202 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 








1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat. . 


7 
5 

38 

3 

214 

317 

158 

1,608 

684 

148 

12 

21 

13 

13 

1 

20 


245 

122 

768 

64 

2,142 

5,750 

1,970 

15,325 

4,943 

3,053 

157 

272 

179 

170 

18 

391 


3 

5 

34 

8 

260 

260 

177 

4,618 

1,162 

466 

32 

11 

12 

6 

6 

27 


7& 




107 


Oats.. 


653: 




153 




3,341 




4,379 




2,219 




43,239' 




8,871 




10.72& 




456. 


Other fresh fruits 

Potatoes 


149 
187 

76 




70 




436. 






Totals 


3,262 


35,569 


7,087 


75,138 






Animals and Products: 


5 


50 


17 
6 
4 
1 
5 


173 




6 




3 
1 
2 
4 
2 


26 
20 
35 
47 
15 


36. 




13 




89 














2 
4 


31 




4 


70 


49 






Totals 


21 


263 


39 


451 


Products of Mines: 


1,057 

2 

204 

47 
47 
14 


46,297 

43 

5,704 

1,520 

1,070 

126 


1,360 

2 

547 

33 

55 

1 


67,567 


Coke 


60 




21,970 




1,035 


Salt 


1,056 




43 






Totals 


1,371 


54,760 


1,998 


91,731 







DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



203 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— Continued 






1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Forests: 


233 

30 

384 

5 


5,043 
519 

8,188 
106 


337 
43 

881 
17 


5,724 


Ties - 


1,028' 


Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and headings- 


19,331 

390 






Totals . 


652 


13,856 


1,278 


26,473- 






Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 


297 


7,566 


456 

1 

97 

12 

4 

23 

1 

122 

187 

647 

33 

22 

2 

272 

18 

14 

16 

6 

822 

1 

221 

263 

9 

1,027 


7,676 




6 




102 

20 

1 

22 

2 

29 

124 

502 

37 

15 


2,103 

848 

5 

550 

38 

386 

5,295 

17,108 

861 

401 


1 , 756 




487 




69 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe- 
Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet. - 


617 
23- 




2,188 




7,185 




21,281 




529 


Sewer pipe and drain tile 


379 


Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 


30 




96 

9 

8 

16 

10 

765 

3 

209 

142 

10 

556 


714 

55 

55 

185 

129 

15,395 

19 

4,895 

1,109 

215 

10,785 


1,445 


Household goods and second-hand furniture 

Furniture (new; . . 


148 

95 




242 


Ice 


98 


Fertilizers (all kinds) . 


18,562 


Paper, printed matter, and books.. 


12 


Chemicals and explosives... . 


5,050' 


Textiles 


2,055 


Canned goods (all canned food products) 


155 


Other manufactures and miscellaneous 


19,207 


Total... 


2,975 


68,717 


4,276 


93,295 






Grand totals, carload traffic 


8,281 


173,165 

13,764 


14,678 


287,086' 


Merchandise — all L. C. L. freight 


33,688 










Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic 


8,281 


186,929 


14,678 


320,774 



204 



N. C. COEPOBATION COMMISSION 



EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED, IN SERVICE OF THE RESPONDENT 

LOCOMOTIVES 





Units Available for Service at 
Close of Year 1922 


Units Available for Service at 
Close of Year 1923 


Class of Equipment 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Tractive 
Power 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Tractive 
Power 




6 


6 


Pounds 
143 .00 


6 


6 


Pounds 
143 .00 











FREIGHT-TRAIN CARS 





Units Available for Service at 
Close of Year 1922 


Units Available for Service at 
Close of Year 1923 


Class of Equipment 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Aggregate 
Capacity 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Aggregate 
Capacity 




8 
21 
18 


8 
21 
18 


Ton* 
240 
630 
540 


2 
17 
16 


2 
17 

16 


Tons 

60 




510 




480 






All classes of freight- 
train cars 


47 


47 


1,410 


35 


35 


1,050 



PASSENGER-TRAIN CARS 





Units Available for Service at 
Close of Year 1922 


Units Available for Service at 
Close of Year 1923 


Class of Equipment 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Total 
Seating 
Capacity 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Total 
Seating 
Capacity 




8 

3 

2 


8 

3 

2 


432 
108 


8 

2 
2 


8 

2 
2 


432 


Combination passenger 


72 


Baggage and express cars.. 




All classes of passenger- 


13 


13 


810 


12 


12 


504 







DURHAM AND SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



205 



EQUIPMENT OWNED OR LEASED, IN SERVICE OF THE RESPONDENT— Continued 
COMPANY SERVICE EQUIPMENT 





Units Available for Service 
at Close of Year 1922 


Units Available for Service 
at Close of Year 1923 


Class of Equipment 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Fully 
Owned 


Officers' and pay cars 


1 

4 


1 

4 


1 

5 


1 
5 






All classes of company service cars 


5 


5 


6 


6 




65 


65 


6 


6 







TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN IT. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Name of State 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 


North Carolina... ... - _ _ .. 


I 20,535.71 


$ 26,187.67 







U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Kind of Tax 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 


U. S. income tax.. _ . 


S 8,277.57 
1,851.00 


$ 17,771.34 


U. S. capital stock tax.. ..... 


1,958.00 







206 



N. C. COKPOKATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 








1922 


1923 


Class of Employees 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 
Executives, general officers, and assistants _ 


6 


$41,086.67 


5 


$ 32,139.42 


Professional, Clerical, and General: 

Professional and subprofessional legal assistants. _ 
Clerks (B) 


3 

1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
2 


1,320.00 
2,430.00 
7,972.50 

120 .00 
60.00 

900 .00 
3,812.50 


2 
6 
2 

1 
1 


1,220.00 
9,402.50 


Clerks (C) 


125 .00 




4,550.00 




2,512.50 


















Totals— 


14 


16,615.00 


9 
9 


40,421.92 




10.850.00 










Maintenance of Way and Structures: 


1 
1 
5 
1 
2 

.1 
1 
2 
7 

28 


2,700.00 

2,041.95 

3,263.61 

1,473.12 

1,499.17 

463 .42 

174.75 

424 .70 

10,819.24 

19,193.17 


1 
1 
5 
1 
3 


2,650.00 




2,079.39 




3,221.43 




15.00 




1,692.46 


Portable steam equipment operators 

Portable steam equipment operator helpers 








3 

7 
23 

1 


1,689.75 




11,126.00 




21,296.53 




1,702.72 


Assistant signalmen and assistant signal main- 


1 


1,697.28 










Totals— 


1 

49 


2,700.00 
41,050 .41 


1 
44 


2,650.00 


Hourly basis 


40,289.55 



EAST CAROLINA RAILWAY 



207 



East Carolina Railway Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Henry Clark Bridgers 

Henry Clark Bridgers 

A D Fowlkes . 


Tarboro, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 

Secretary 

Treasurer 


Tarboro, N. C. 
Tarboro, N. C. 


Henry Clark Bridgers ' 

Henry Clark Bridgers 


Tarboro, N. C. 
Tarboro, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

Henry Clark Bridgers, John L. Bridgers, A. D. Fowlkes, J. T. Hagans, Tarboro, N. C. ; 
B. F. D. Albritton, Hookerton, N. C. ; W. J. Turnage, J. R. Davis, Farmville, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized July 1, 1898, under Laws of North Carolina, Public Laws of State of North 
Carolina. Chapter amended and enlarged by Private Laws of said State, ratified by General 
Assembly, March 11, 1901, Chapter 362. 



ROAD OPERATED 




Tarboro, N C , to Hookerton, N. C. (miles) 


38.20 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating reyenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue, ._ 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



55,500.00 


$ 55,500.00 


1,452.89 


1,452.89 


300,000.00 


300,000.00 


7,853.40 


7,853.40 


275,103.82 


275,103.82 


7,201.67 


7,201.67 


12,200.00 


12,200.00 


319.37 


319.37 


7,521.04 


7,521.04 


160,309.06 


167,695.15 


135,077.27 


149,918.37 


25,231.79 


17,776.78 


4,196.57 


4,389.92 


3,536.05 


3.924.56 


140,669.65 


151,288.61 


16,589.08 


13,662.65 


3,682.45 


3,960.43 


36.751 


320.03 


434.28 


8 357.66 


3,053.33 


2,743.89 


5,633.45 


5,447.62 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 7; station agents, 7; other station men, 
1; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; carpenters, 1; other shop- 
men, 2; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 12; total, 45. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 
4; office clerks, 5; station agents, 7; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 2; 
machinists, 1: other shopmen, 5; section foremen, 4; other trackmen, 17; total, 51. 



208 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad Company 





OFFICERS 






Title 


Name 


Official Address 




President 

Vice-President and Treasurer 


Edgar P. Earle 


Johnson City, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 
Cranberry, N. C. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 




General Superintendent.. _ 


F. M. Allison 




Secretary. . 


A. H. Fisher 











DIRECTORS 

Edgar P. Earle, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Aria Pardee, Philadelphia, Pa. ; H. W. Warden, Jr., 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; Henry Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa. ; J. H. Epps, Jonesboro, Tenn. ; J. E. 
Vance, Johnson City, Tenn. ; A. G. B. Steele, Philadelphia, Pa. 



HISTORY 

Organized May 24, 1866, reorganized May 22, 1879, under the laws of Tennessee ; Acts of 
Assembly 1865, and 1866 ; reorganized, Acts of Assembly passed March 4, approved March 6, 
1879. 

The name of this company is "East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad 
Company." It was incorporated under and pursuant to a special Act of the Legislature of 
the State of Tennessee, passed May 24, 1866 — being chapter 88 of the Laws of 1865-66, 
section 23, by which the charter of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company, 
passed July 27, 1848, was made the charter of this company. 

By decree of Chancery Court at Nashville, Tennessee, on the 15th day of November, 
1871, the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad was sold to John Hughes 
et al., from whom it was purchased on the 16th day of February, 1876, by the present 
owners and reorganized under Acts of Assembly, State of Tennessee, passed March 4th, 
approved March 6, 1879. 

The East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad is a narrow (36") gauge single 
track line extending from Johnson City, Tennessee, to Cranberry, N. C, a distance of about 
34 miles, with a third rail for handling standard gauge cars between Johnson City and 
Elizabethton, Tennessee, a distance of 10 miles. 

The road was opened from Johnson City, Tennessee, to Hampton, Tennessee, a distance 
of about 14 miles, August 22, 1881, and from Hampton, Tennessee to Cranberry, North 
Carolina, July 3, 1882. 

In 1910 a spur line of 3-rail track was built from Buffalo Bridge (near Watauga Point, 
Tenn.) to Smallings, Tennessee, a distance of about 2 miles. 

The said railroad, including the above spur, has at all times and now is operated by the 
said East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad Company, whose general offices 
are located at Johnson City, Tennessee. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To— 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Johnson City, Tenn 


Cranberry, N. C 


3.18 


36.18 



EAST TENNESSEE AND WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD 



209 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .? 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



490,800.00 


$ .490,800.00 


13,595.00 


13,565.00 


500,000.00 


500,000.00 


13,850.00 


13,850.00 


942,922.00 


966,154.56 


36,119.00 


26,704.10 


295,238.00 


296,281.14 


8,178.00 


8,189.08 


34,297.00 


34,893.18 


316,650.00 


431,629.87 


194,712.00 


254,617.77 


121,938.00 


177,012.10 


8,771.00 


11,930.06 


5,304.00 


7,037.52 


230,022.00 


340,003.81 


78,326.00 


83,626.20 


6,372.00 


9,397.52 


23,398 


24,980 


2,170.00 


$ 2,311.39 


8,302.00 


7,999.86 


.0342 


.0345 


1,538.00 


2,083.89 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 6; station agents, 8; other station men, 
24; enginemen, 5; firemen, 5; conductors, 5; other trainmen, 11; machinists, 1; carpenters, 4; other shop- 
men, 4; telegraph operators, 2; section foremen, 5; other trackmen, 25; other employees, 3; total, 111. 
Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 6; station agents, 8; other station men, 38; 
enginemen, 4; firemen, 4; conductors, 4; other trainmen, 8; machinists, 2; carpenters, 8; other shopmen, 
7; telegraph operators, 2; section foremen, 5; other trackmen, 49; other employees, 9; total, 158. 



Part 11—14 



210 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Elkin and Alleghany Railroad Company 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. G. Chatham 




General Manager or Superintendent. ... 




Elkin, N. C. 






Elkin, N C 




J. P. Ipock... 


Elkin, N C 









DIRECTORS 

H. G. Chatham, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; C. C. Smoot, III, N. Wilkesboro, N. C. ; G. T. 
Roth, Elkin, N. C. ; R. A. Doughton, Sparta, N. C. ; J. W. Ring, Elkin, N. C. ; A. A. 
Woodruff, Cherry Lane, N. C. ; R. M. Chatham, Elkin, N. C. ; A. M. Smith, Elkin, N. C. ; 
Alex. Chatham, Elkin, N. C. ; A. G. Click, Elkin, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized January 31, 1922, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Elkin, N. C., to Veneer, N. C. (miles). 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock __ __ 

Capital stock, per mile. 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile.. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue.. . 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile.. 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, Nprth Carolina 



56,000.00 


$ 56,000.00 


3,733.33 


3,733.33 


45,000.00 


45,000.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


13,000.00 


13,000.00 


866.66 


866.66 


3,866.66 


3,866.66 


18,552.98 


25,461.96 


21,923.47 


24,849.03 


*3,370.49 


612.93 


1,236.86 


1,690.79 


1,461.56 


1,656.60 


14,705.83 


21,368.40 


1,715.00 


1,337.38 


980.39 


1,424.56 


1,978 


1,523 


114.33 


$ 89.16 


2,132.15 


2,756.18 


.87 


.88 


376.60 


376.80 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; fire- 
men, 1; conductors, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 5; total, 15. Employees, 1923: Number 
general officers, 4; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; section 
foremen, 1; other trackmen, 4; total, 14. 



'Deficit. 



FRENCH BEOAD RAILROAD 



211 



French Broad Railroad Company 



HISTORY 
Organized June 4, 1919, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Runion, N. C, to Belva, N. C. (miles). 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




Item 


1922 


Capital stock ... .. 


$ 75,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile 


9,375.00 


Operating revenue. 


48,439.81 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included).. 


31,648.45 


Net operating revenue. . _ . 


16,791.36 


Operating revenue, per mile... .. 


6,054.97 


Operating expenses, per mile .. T _ . .. .. 


3,956.06 


Total freight revenue. 


48,439.81 


Freight revenue, per mile . _ 


6,054.97 







Employees: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 
1; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 2; section foremen, 
1; other trackmen, 6; total, 21. 

Note.— During 1923 stock of company was owned by Broad River Lumber Co., with head- 
quarters at Huntington, W. Va. Said company now out of business and present owners, Griffith 
Lumber Co., Stackhouse, N. C, unable to get books to make report for 1923. 



212 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



High Point, Thomasville and Denton Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




C. F. Tomlinson 


High Point, N. C. 




High Point, N. C. 






High Point, N. C. 






High Point, N. C. 







DIRECTORS 

C. F. Tomlinson, High Point. N. C. ; R. B. Terry, High Point, N. C. ; J. E. Millis, High 
Point, N. C. ; O. Arthur Kirkman, High Point, N. C. ; T. J. Finch, Thomasville, N. C. ; 
B. I. Harrison, Denton, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized May 11, 1923, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 



High Point, N. C, to High Rock, N. C. (miles). 



34.81 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 




Item 


1922 




$ 1,000,000.00 




28,727.00 




125,000.00 




3,588.00 







Note.— Did not operate during 1923. Will get to operating June 1, 1924. 



KINSTON CAROLINA RAILROAD 



213 



Kinston Carolina Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




G. R. Loyall 


Norfolk, Va. 


Superintendent 


J. C. Poe 


Kinston, N. C. 


M. S. Hawkins ... . . ... 


Norfolk, Va. 






Norfolk, Va. 




J. F. Dalton 


Norfolk, Va. 









DIRECTORS 

G. R. Loyall, Norfolk, Va. ; C. F. Harvey, Kinston, N. C. ; M. S. Hawkins, Norfolk, Va. ; 
E. D. Kyle, Norfolk, Va. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 25, 1910, under Laws of North Carolina, State of North Carolina, 
especially provisions of Sections 1239, 1240 and 1241 of Pell's Revisal of 1908, N. C, p. 641. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Kinston, N. C, to Beulaville, N. C. (miles). 



30.47 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capita] stock, per mile . 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile... . 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile . 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile... 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



33,000.00 


S 35,000.00 


1,148.67 


1,148.67 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


114.87 


114.87 


57,871.86 


58,060.85 


1,899.31 


1,905.51 


27,267.36 


27,267.36 


894.89 


894.89 


2,794.20 


2,800.40 


59,534.22 


40,297.20 


49,211.07 


33,873.69 


10,323.15 


6,423.51 


1,953.86 


1,322.52 


1,615.09 


1,111.71 


52,744.98 


34,165.88 


6,807.36 


5,636.70 


1,731.05 


1,121.30 


5,576 


4,702 


223.48 


$ 184.99 


18.12 


494.62 


.3556 


.03514 


2,876.53 


2,526.75 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; fire- 
men, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 4; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 2; section foremen, 2; other 
trackmen, 5; total, 25. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 2; 
enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 2; section 
foremen, 2; other trackmen, 6; total, 25. 



214 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Laurinburg and Southern Railroad Company 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President .. 


John F. McNair 




General Manager or Superintendent 


James L. McNair 






C. E. Beman 


Laurinburg, N. C. 




Z. V. Pate... 




G. Y. Jones 











DIRECTORS 

John F. McNair, Laurinburg, N. C. ; James L. McNair, Laurinburg, N. C. ; N. G. 
Wade, Jacksonville, Fla. ; John Blue, Laurinburg, N. C. ; A. A. James, Laurinburg, N. C. ; 
D. M. Flynn, Jacksonville, Fla. ; A. M. Fairley, Laurinburg, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized March 8, 1909, under Laws of North Carolina, Private Laws 1909. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Johns, N. C., to Raeford, N. C. (miles). 



30 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock ... 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road.. 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue. 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources.. 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



225,000.00 


$ 225,000.00 


7,500.00 


7,500.00 


75,000.00 


75,000.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


355,232.30 


382,129.25 


11,841.08 


12,737.64 


137,866.15 


141,793.01 


129,177.30 


109,464.14 


8,688.85 


32,328.87 


4,595.54 


4,726.44 


4,305.91 


3,648.80 


135,679.62 


138,090.63 


1,704.66 


1,875.02 


4,522.65 


4,603.02 


56.82 


62.50 


481.87 


1,827.35 


4,360.54 


3,396.95 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 3; other station men, 
1; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 30; 
total, 51. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 3; other station 
men, 1; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 3; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 
30; total, 52. 



LAWNDALE KAILWAY AND INDUSTRIAL COMPANY 



215 



Lawndale Railway and Industrial Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




John F. Schenck, Sr 






John F. Schenck, Sr 


Lawndale, N. C. 




John F. Schenck, Jr 

Carme Elam 


Shelby, N. C. 











DIRECTORS 

George W. Morgan, 70 Thomas Street, New York, N. Y. ; F. C. Reynolds, New York, 
N. Y. ; John F. Schenck, Sr., Lawndale, N. C. ; Hal E. Schenck, Lawndale, N. C. ; John F. 
Schenck, Jr., Shelby, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 10, 1888, under Laws of North Carolina. Charter amended January 31, 
1901, and November 11, 1903. 



ROAD OPERATED 




Shelby, N. C, to Lawndale, N. C. (miles) 


11.05 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile... 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue. 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



60,000.00 


$ 60,000.00 


6,465.52 


6,465.52 


57,466.54 




6,192.51 




21,742.08 


79,031.16 


2,342.89 


8,516.29 


8,535.40 


8,516.29 


18,671.71 


18,342.73 


16,949.07 


16,812.39 


1,722.64 


1,530.34 


1,689.74 


1,659.97 


1,533.85 


1,521.48 


18.458.51 


18,131.63 


213 .20 


211.10 


1,670.40 


1,640.87 


19.29 


19.10 


449 .50 


386.33 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 1; station agents, 2; enginemeri, 1; fire- 
men, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; carpenters, 2; section foremen, 1; other track- 
men, 3; total, 18. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 1; station agents, 2; engine- 
men, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; carpenters, 2; section foremen, 1; 
other trackmen, 3; total, 18. 

Note. — We own 9.28 miles and use 1.77 miles of Seaboard Air Line Railway Company's track, 
making 11.05 miles operated. 



216 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Linville River Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Edgar P. Earle 


Johnson City, Tenn. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 




J. E. Vance.. 




F. M. Allison 




A. H. Fisher 











DIRECTORS 

Edgar P. Earle, Philadelphia, Pa. ; A. G. B. Steele, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Aria Pardee, 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; H. W. Warden, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Henry Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
J. H. Epps, Jonesboro, Tenn. ; D. W. Mackie, Cranberry, N. C. ; J. E. Vance, Johnson City, 
Tenn. 



HISTORY 

Originally incorporated as the "Linville River Railroad Company" under the general laws 
of the State of North Carolina, by letters of incorporation bearing date of July 30, 1896. 

The said Linville River Railroad Company, after having begun construction of a railroad 
in Mitchell County, North Carolina, became involved in debt and failed, and pursuant to a 
decree of the Superior Court of Mitchell County at the April, 1898, term, was sold to Issac T. 
Mann. 

The Linville River Railroad Company was issued a Certificate of Incorporation by the 
Secretary of State of North Carolina under date of August 29, 1899, and by virtue of deed 
bearing date of September 22, 1899, acquired the railroad property of the said Isaac T. Mann. 

This railroad is a narrow (36") gauge single-track line, extending from Cranberry, North 
Carolina, to Pineola, North Carolina, a distance of about 12 miles, and from Montezuma, 
N. C, to Boone, N. C, a distance of about 22 miles — total length about 34 miles. 

The line was partially constructed between Cranberry and Pineola in the years 1897-8 
by the Linville River Railroad Company, and completed between those points by Isaac T. 
Mann, during the year 1899. The line was extended from Montezuma to Shulls Mills in 
1916, and from Shulls Mills to Boone in 1918. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 




Pineola, N. C 


12 

22 






Boone, N. C._. 


34 









LINVILLE RIVER RAILROAD 



217 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capit al stock '. 

Capital stock, per mile... 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue.. 

Total passenger-train service revenue. . 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile. 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



450,000.00 


$ 450,000.00 


13,235.29 


13,235.29 


89,114.40 


91,110.83 


2,621.01 


2,679.73 


83,680.48 


83,680.48 


2,461.19 


2,461.19 


5,082.20 


5,140.92 


133,002.91 


154,966.72 


113,733.70 


124,841.47 


19,269.21 


30,125.25 


3,911.85 


4,557.86 


3,345.11 


3,671.80 


106,252.20 


126,100.52 


25,220.01 


26,942.76 


3,125.06 


3,708.84 


59,452 


63,875 


741 .76 


$ 792 .43 


1,530.70 


1,923.44 


.02615 


.02632 


4,284.49 


5,923.48 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 3; station agents, 7; other station men, 
1; enginemen, 3; firemen, 3; conductors, 3; other trainmen, 6; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section 
foremen, 5; other trackmen, 24; other employees, 2; total, 63. Employees, 1923: Number general 
officers, 4; office clerks, 3; station agents, 7; other station men, 1; enginemen, 3; firemen, 3; conductors, 
3; other trainmen, 6; machinists, 1; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 5; other track- 
men, 25; other employees, 2; total, 65. 



218 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




W. L. Mapother .. 




General Manager or Superintendent... . 


T. E. Brooks 




Secretary 

Treasurer 


J. C. Michael 

E. S. Locke 

A. J. Pharr 


Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 




W. A. Northcutt _•__ 











DIRECTORS 

F. B. Adams, New York ; August Belmont, New York ; Lyman Delano, Wilmington ; 
George B. Elliott, Wilmington ; L. W. Botts, Louisville ; George C. Jenkins, Baltimore ; 
J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C. ; W. L. Mapother, Louisville ; J. J. Nelligan, Baltimore ; 
Edward W. Sheldon, New York ; Frederic W. Scott, Richmond, Va. ; Henry Walters, 
Baltimore ; John I. Waterbury, Morristown, N. J. 



HISTORY 

Organized March 5, 1850, under Laws of Kentucky. Acts of Kentucky Legislature, approved 
March 5, 1850 (Acts 1849-50, p. 427), and numerous amendments. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 




Murphy, N. C 


13.20 


5,038.77 









LOUISVILLE AND NASHVILLE RAILROAD 



219 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— ENTIRE LINE 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock... 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue .*. 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per. mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



$72,000,000.00 


% 72,000,000.00 


14,426.43 


14,426.43 


202,057,030.00 


207,970,530.00 


40,458.58 


41,274.00 


244,398,161.56 


♦364,527,292.83 


49,047.87 




94,553,722.75 




19,350.78 




68,398.65 


73,156.09 


121,140,206.64 


136,375,672.88 


99,600,024.89 


109,865,090.37 


21,540,181.75 


26,510,582.51 


24,041.53 


27,659.63 


18,766.66 


21,799.41 


90,685,370.10 


101,680,239.89 


28,751,995.73 


31,834,430.67 


17,997.45 


20,175.38 


12,831,419 


13,280,342 


$ 5,706.13 


$ 6,316.58 


1,702,840.81 


2,861,002.32 


.03406 


.03388 


6,277.57 


3,809,379.11 



Employees: Number general officers, 453; office clerks, 5,200; station agents, 360; other station men, 
1,916; enginemen, 1,480; firemen, 1,528; conductors, 1,346; other trainmen, 3,896; machinists, 1,194; 
carpenters, 4,258; other shopmen, 5,324; telegraph operators, 1,103; section foremen, 1,060; other track- 
men, 11,483; other employees, 5,008; total, 45,609. 



*Cost of road and equipment. 

CAPITAL STOCK, ETC.— NORTH CAROLINA 



Item 


1922 


1923 


Capital stock ..... ... 


$ *190,016.50 

14,426.43 

*534,409.65 

40,485.58 

*647,431.88 

49,047.87 

*255,430.30 

19,350.78 

68,398.65 

27,627.12 

57,721.27 

t40,094.15 

2,092.96 

5,130.40 

10,999.46 

15,593.57 

833 .29 

23,651 

$ 1,181.33 

1,034.09 

.05677 

6,277.57 


$ *190,016.50 


Capital stock, per mile . 


14,426.43 


Funded debt . 


*544,816.80 


Funded debt, per mile 


41,274.00 


Cost of road 




Cost of road, per mile _ 




Cost of equipment 


♦965,660.38 


Cost of equipment, per mile 




Cost of road and equipment, per mile.. 


73,156.09 


Operating revenue. 


33,601.34 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 


72,047.65 


Net operating revenue 


t38,446.31 
2,545.56 


Operating revenue, per mile 


Operating expenses, per mile 


5,458.16 


Total freight revenue 


16,002.32 


Total passenger- train service revenue .. 


16,330.74 


Freight revenue, per mile . 


1,212.30 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


24,494 


Passenger service train revenue, per mile 


$ 1,237.18 


Revenue from other sources.. 


'968 .28 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile 


.05194 


Taxes paid, North Carolina 


6,771.59 



^Employees: Station agents, 2; other station men, 2; shopmen, 2; telegraph operators, 1; section 
foremen, 1; other trackmen, 6; total, 14. 

*On mileage basis. fDeficit. 



220 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Maxton, Alma and Southbound Railroad Company 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. A. McKinnon 


Maxton, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


W. W. Crews 


Alma, N. C. 
Alma, N. C. 




A. J. McKinnon, Jr.. 


Maxton, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

H. A. McKinnon, Maxton, N. C. ; A. J. McKinnon, Jr., Maxton, N. C. ; C. J. Cottingham, 
Alma, N. C. ; J. W. Ward, Rowland, N C. ; G. M. Pate, Rowland, N. C. ; R. L. McLeod, 
Maxton, N. C. ; A. L. Bullock, Rowland, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized February 11, 1911, under Laws of North Carolina. Session 1911, Chapter 
pp. 199 to 208, inclusive, Private Laws. 

ROAD OPERATED 



Alma, N. C, to Rowland, N. C. (miles). 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile. 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



75,000.00 

5,000.00 

111,173.82 

7,411.00 

28,812.29 

1,987.50 

9,398.50 

25,824.77 

30,838.84 

*5,014.07 

1,721.64 

2,055.92 

22,439.60 

3,385.17 

1,495.97 

4,665 

225.68 



.0304 
828.71 



75,000.00 

5,000.00 

111,173.82 

7,411.58 

29,812.29 
1,987.50 
9,399.08. 

33,004.67 

27,928.09 
5.076.58 
2,200.31 
1,861.87 

29,430.14 

2,178.36 

1,962.01 

4,125 

145 .22 

1,396.17 

.0313 

1,232.60 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 1; station agents, 2; other station men, 
1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; carpenter.-!, 1; other shop- 
men, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 6; total, 21. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 1; 
office clerks, 1; station agents, 3; other station men, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other 
trainmen, 1; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 5; other employees, 
1; total, 19. 



'Deficit. 



THE NEW HOLLAND, HIGGINSPORT AND MT. VERNON RAILROAD 221 



The New Holland, Higginsport and Mount Vernon Railroad 

Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Dwight Harrison 

Van B. Martin 

W. J. Tally 

W. J. Tally 


Columbus, Ohio 
Plymouth, N. C. 


Assistant Secretary 


New Holland, N. C. 
New Holland, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

Dwight Harrison, Columbus, Ohio ; William G. Beneham, Columbus, Ohio ; John R. Wil- 
banks, Columbus, Ohio ; D. H. Kirman, Lima, Ohio ; Carroll B. Spencer, Swan Quarter, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized October 14, 1920, under Laws of North Carolina. 







ROAD OPERATED 




Wenona, N. C. 


to New Holland, N. C. 


(miles) :.__ 


35 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue -.- 

Operating revenue, per mile... 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue. 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. _. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources... 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



916,037.20 


$ 858,303.27 


26,172.45 


24,522.95 


61,315.54 


76,136.89 


1,754.73 


2,175.34 


27.18 


26,698.29 


39,417.11 


36,990.61 


42,946.57 


51,175.90 


3,529.46 


14,185.29 


1,126.20 


1,056.87 


1,227.04 


1,462.17 




25,520.56 




5,377.12 




729.16 




8,137 




$ 153.63 




6,092.93 




.035 


102.66 


112.93 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 4; station agents, 3; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; con- 
ductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 2; telegraph operators, 1; 
section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 18; total, 40. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 4; station 
agents, 3; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 
1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 8; total, 25. 



*No separate record of these items kept during construction for year 1922. 
from January 1, 1923. 



Complete records 



222 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Norfolk and Western Railway Company 







PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 




N. D. Maher 

A. C. Needles .. 










Charles S. Churchill 






E. H. Alden 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




istant Treasurer 




I. W. Booth 












Thomas W. Reath 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




F. M. Rivinns 






W. H. Wilson 






W. J. Jenks. 






W. P. Wiltsel 






J. T. Carey 


Roanoke, Va. 











DIRECTORS 

John P. Green, Philadelphia, Pa. ; W. W. Atterbury, Philadelphia, Pa. ; M. C. Kennedy, 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; David Flickwir, Roanoke, "Va. ; Samuel Rea, Philadelphia, Pa. ; N. D. 
Maher, Roanoke, Va. ; Childs Frick, Roslyn, L. I., N. Y. ; E. H. Alden, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
A. C. Needles, Roanoke, Va. ; F. S. Royster, Norfolk, Va. ; S. P. Bush, Columbus, Ohio. 



HISTORY 

Organized under Act of General Assembly of Virginia, approved January 15, 1896, entitled, 
"An Act authorizing the purchase of the Railroads and property of the Norfolk and Western 
Railroad Company, sold by foreclosure of a deed of trust or mortgage thereon, to become 
and be a corporation, to adopt a name therefor, and to possess and exercise general and 
other powers." 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



223 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$318,089,258.27 


Investments: 


$328,822,864.93 

19,652.25 

3,692,076.03 

1,454,171.42 

323,441.25 

13,496,078.36 

4,696.40 
15,953,301.15 


$ 334,779,523.23 


19,925.68 
3,564,776.76 


Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 


8,178.94 
3,844,891.88 


1,452,471.42 


Investments in affiliated companies — 


2,079,871.42 


211,122.00 




286,892.00 


3,603,889.75 




13,559,145.61 


4,696.40 


Other investments — 


4,696.40 


12,396,968.98 




13,461,360.81 








339,343,109.26 


363,766,281.79 


368,024,560.29 




Current Assets: 




5,591,626.87 


2,903,576.18 


4,152,001.28 


600,000.00 






678,633.86 




281,232.28 

1,892,225.89 

868,297.61 

2,304,903.42 

11,291,187.33 

51,548.34 

34,561.62 


258,719.20 


2,463,764.78 

648,803.70 

3,260,212.39 


Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 


1,617,979.51 

721,062.50 

6,450,220.01 


12,702,711.40 




14,637,077.87 


46,852.26 




28,336.23 


37,883.00 




35,456.48 




Total current assets __ 




26,030,488.26 


19,627,532.67 


27,900,853.08 




Deferred Assets: 




14,771.87 


8,590.43 
49,811,974.35 
15,600,000.00 


9,228.85 


49,894,954.33 




1,561.09 


17,640,080.00 




15,370,350.00 




Total deferred assets 




67,549,806.20 


65,420,564.78 


15,381,140.74 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance.. 




16,784.57 


34,783.34 


37,430.45 
552,545.44 








391,283.75 


1,055,129.01 


Other unadjusted debits 


1,009,647.81 






Total unadjusted debits .. 




1,071,913.58 


1,044,431.15 


981,259.64 




Grand totals 




433,995,317.30 


449,858,810.39 


412,287,813.75 









224 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— Continued 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$144,512,000.00 


Stock: 
Capital stock .. 


$150,819,200.00 


$ 151,986,600.00 




Long-term Debt: 
Funded debt unmatured 

Current Liabilities: 
Loans and bills payable . 




113,111,900.00 


103,217,700.00 


101,672,800.00 




2,250,000.00 

263,217.20 

5,227,084.26 

488,041.96 

520,510.50 

10,360.50 

6,000.00 

229,923.00 

1,124,376.50 




107,359.48 


135,837.67 


2,859,350.25 




5,236,776.97 


421,870.19 


Miscellaneous accounts payable .. . . . 


499,822.70 


524,368.50 




54,912.00 


20,926.00 




10,374.75 


6,000.00 




6,000.00 


229,923.00 




229,923.00 


1,277,996.33 




1,124,341.00 








5,447,793.75 


10,119,514.42 


7,597,988.09 




Deferred Liabilities: 
U. S. Government deferred liabilities 




40,301,386.36 


40,382,344.24 
25,645,125.71 


967.75 


17,647,023.42 




24,825,467.83 








57,948,409.78 


66,027,469.95 


24,826,435.58 




Unadjusted Credits: 




2,045,525.56 


3,256,227.76 

654,650.23 

9,102,064.90 

24,880,372.97 

247,990.99 
997,812.24 


3,465,887.01 


486,713.31 




568,971.50 


8,268,205.01 




9,888,501.10 


24,006,869.69 




23,152,420.92 


172,615.77 


Accrued depreciation — miscellaneous physical 


365,441.71 


1,252,923.99 




939,253.42 








36,232,853.33 


39,139,119.09 


38,380,475.66 




Corporate Surplus: 
Additions to property through income and sur- 




41,217,989.81 


43,259,787.28 
37,276,019.65 


43,374,631.97 


35,524,370.63 




44,448,882.45 








76,742,360.44 


80,535,806.93 


87,823,514.42 








433,995,317.30 


449,858,810.39 


412,287,813.75 









ROAD OPERATED 



Name of Road or Track 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 

Second 

Main 

Track 


Miles of 

Third Main 

Track 


Miles of 

Industrial 

Tracks 


Miles of 

Yard 

Track and 

Sidings, 

Etc. 


Total 


N. and W. Ry.— 1922 

N. and W. Ry.— 1923. 


2,237.88 
2,239.88 


556 .95 
556.40 


11.41 
13 .58 


395 .50 
398 .40 


1,134.94 
1,129.79 


4,336.68 
4,338.05 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



225 



New 
Line 
Con- 
structed 


d t* 










CO i i i i 
CO r I i I 

CO 1 








Line 

Owned, 

Not 

Operated, 

Branch 

Lines 


CO 1 1 1 

O i i i 
N i i i 




S 

CM 


eo i 1 i i 

© i i i I 
CM I I I 




CO 

© 

CM 


T5 
0> 

"cS 

CU 

a 

o 

-d 

O 


Total 
Mileage 
Operated 


ffl 00 ^ "5 K) N 
OS US CM O O O 


00 
00 

CO 

CM 


1,270.99 

523 .58 

16.21 

131 .05 

21.03 

272 .02 


00 
00 


00 CO CO i—l i— l t— 
» IN H W N N 
CM lO H CM 


CO 
CM 

cm" 


Line 
Operated 

Under 
Trackage 

Rights 


. 1.74 

.63 
.31 


CM 
OS 

CM 


o 

co 


1.74 

.63 
.31 

12.92 


o 
co 


Line 
Operated 

Under 
Contract, 

etc. 


■ i i i <# i 

■ i i i r — r 

i 1 ! i o 
i i i i cm ■ 


o 

CM 










Line 

Operated 

Under 

Lease 










1 1 1 1 T*< 
1 1 1 1 t^ 

! ! ! ! o 

i i i i CM 




o 

CM 




l l l l OS 1 

i i i i CM i 


cs 
CM 


i i i i os 

i i i i CM 




OS 
CM 


T3 

a 

O 
<u 

a 


C3.S 


313.35 

282 .83 

43.09 


OS 
CM 

OS 


CO 
lO 

00 
KS 

CO 


315.35 
282 .83 

43.09 

19.29 


CO 

«q 

o 

CO 

co 


a> 

■a .a 


953 .90 

240.75 

15.58 

87.65 


00 
CM 


OS 
CO 

CM 


953 .90 

240.75 
15.58 
87.65 

244.81 


OS 
CO 

CM 

s 








1922— 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

M aryland 

North Carolina 


] 

o 

la 
O 


9 

c 
E- 




1923— 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

M aryland 

North Carolina 

Kentucky 

Ohio 




Of 

c 
E- 





Part 11—15 



226 



N. C. COEPOEATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Freight 

Passenger 

Excess baggage 

Mail 

E xpress 

Other passenger-train. 
Switching 

Special service train... 
Other freight-train 



Total rail-line transportation revenue. 



Dining and buffet 

Hotel and restaurant 

Station, train, and boat privileges 

Parcel room 

Storage — f rei ght 

Storage — baggage 

Demurrage 

Telegraph and telephone... 

Grain elevator 

Stockyard 

Power 

Rents of buildings and other property- 
Miscellaneous. 



Total incidental operating revenues. 



Joint facility — Cr.. 
Joint facility— Dr. 



Total joint facility operating revenue- 
Total railway operating revenues 



$77,637,430.88 

9,192,599.00 

67,799.92 

933,419.52 

1,204,963.91 

56,142.77 

337,682.96 

17,800.18 

2,704.05 



$ 81,320,794.26 

10,194,497.03 

71,040.04 

989,497.35 

1,237,913.22 

52,442.51 

409,564.20 

30,221.56 

13,256.47 



89,450,543.19 


94,319,226.64 


189,748.43 


224,041.19 


44,789.75 


39,114.55 


42,057.57 


38,192.82 


15,767.57 


16,938.52 


48,713.87 


43,015.23 


4,691.02 


5,386.79 


122,626.93 


431,707.77 


184.10 


57.05 


1,760.78 


1,759.41 


11,443.84 


7,708.49 


21,169.25 


23,469.09 


33,604.47 


31,011.30 


328,794.31 


321,088.00 


865,351.89 


1,183,490.21 


4,993.59 


12,713.79 


R 6,146.33 


R 20,743.38 


R 1,152.74 


R 8,029.59 



90,314,742.34 



95,494,687.26 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



227 



Oi M OO lO « ■* M 



ITS t- I CO t~ C3 O O -# 

t^i— ii— i n m oo n «3 



<D (O N lO M 



lO O CM O Cs| 



65 



U3 n e to M ifl 



CNlOC^tOCMCT2T-<lOi-< 
t« «■* ># H O N * H 

i— ii— i •* a n io >o m >- 1 



!M CN i-h 



11 

5h 2 



»o O t^ CO t-h 

in io <m~ io 



O 00 Iffl 



CD IC O O ■"* 



oscocoococNicnioo; 



to N IO N n CO 
<M 00 IC LO CO tO 

N CO 00 tO 00 IO 



s co to ec 



N CM O 't 



o w ■* 



N N ,h 



tO « 113 15 N U3 
ce N 00 >* N 



co w to 



•O <M CO <N 



CO O <M t-h 



O rt T-l 



? I 



I I 



Q S 



228 



N. C. CORPOKATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence. . . 

Roadway maintenance— yard 

Roadway maintenance — other 

Tunnels and subways— yard , 

Tunnels and subways— other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — yard 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — other 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts — depreciation — other. 

Ties — yard 

Ties — other 

Rails — yard 

Rails — other 

Other track material — yard 

Other track material — other.. 

Ballast — yard 

Ballast — other 

Track laying and surfacing — yard 

Track laying and surfacing — other 

Right-of-way fences — yard 

Right-of-way fences — other 

Crossings and signs — yard 

Crossings and signs — other 

Station and office buildings 

Station and office buildings— depreciation 

Roadway buildings 

Water stations 

Water stations — depreciation.. 

Fuel stations 

Fuel stations— depreciation 

Shops and enginehouses 

Shops and enginehouses — depreciation 

Grain elevators — depreciation 

Wharves and docks 

Wharves and docks— depreciation 

Coal and ore wharves 

Coal and ore wharves — depreciation 

Telegraph and telephone lines 

Signals and interlockers 

Signals and interlockers— depreciation 

Power plant dams, canals, and pipe lines 

Power plant buildings 

Power plant buildings — depreciation 

Power substation buildings 

Power transmission systems 

Power transmission systems — depreciation 

Power distribution systems 

Power distribution systems — depreciation 

Power line poles and fixtures 

Power line poles and fixtures — depreciation 

Miscellaneous structures 

Paving 



4 
378 
211 
269 

2,620 
106 

1,445 
110 
558 

261 

185 

2,091 

50 
11 
84 

195 

176 
7 

143 

45 

69 

. 15 

358 

96 

2 

44 

21 

105 
45 

123 

490 



,107.42 
,092.32 
,538.71 
,449.18 
,369.39 
,414.31 
,267.59 
,856.04 
,750.71 
,713.61 
,525.29 
, 835 .35 
,224.73 
,323.25 
785 .44 
,787.13 
,184.67 
,441.14 
92.28 
,021.86 
,526.35 
,372.49 
, 748 .34 
,679.96 
,090.69 
, 650 .62 
, 639 .96 
,880.92 
,964.08 
,435.63 
,236.04 
,400.00 
,908.19 
,319.92 
,386.76 
,999.96 
,400.37 
,432.72 



7.52 

3,130.90 

13,418.40 

405 .00 

1,691.27 

6,918.60 

62,506.08 

11,193.86 

27,113.05 

8,189.87 

267.18 

49.30 



595,082.13 

196,844.35 

1,055,030.98 

2,252.66 

55,216.84 

6,136.58 

385,385.05 

211,856.04 

215,403.63 

2,089,732.95 

44,764.42 

916,987.36 

88,704.19 

704,475.93 

2,478.56 

488,430.67 

209,639.37 

2,331,028.17 



73,399.99 

7,934.91 

122,444.37 

282,801.76 

176, 679 .9& 

9,872.97 

188,598.20 

45,639.96 

93,152.05 

15, 964 .OS 

410,136.68 

96,236.04 

2,400.00 

22,261.41 

21,319.92 

123,989.65 

45,999.96 

117,194.84 

549,102.51 

.02 



4,986.16 

13,448.72 

582 .90 

4,253.19 

6,918.60 
57,862.93 
11,179.56 
11,152.39 

8,175.32 



384.71 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



229 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE-Continued 




Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Maintenance of Wat and Structures— Con. 


$ 81,605.69 

227,038.25 

30,328.19 

5,835.59 

26,743.46 

67,291.96 

7,103.19 

R 1,149.34 


% 115,990.80 




274,340.30 




17,195.66 




2,253.12 




56,021.24 




62,441.72 




10,062.87 




549 .55 






Totals 


12,663,541.76 

60,306.87 

R 277,556.51 


12,668,378.92 




113,634.47 




R 375,420.11 








12,446,292.12 


12,406,593.28 






Maintenance of Equipment: 


521,492.40 

335,336.14 

166,198.41 

118,496.54 

23,435.92 

7,285.62 

9,154,637.67 

788,511.05 

2,502.93 

276,612.07 

34,841.45 

8,015,645.27 

1,563,316.46 

1,119,013.09 

887,960.70 

110,259.00 

1,398.00 

6,238.11 

544 .08 

146,670.92 

50,345.10 

6,178.92 

8,432.34 

1,765.84 

712 .80 

37,067.01 

80,505.45 

40,549.34 

325.60 


511,206.47 




539,973.01 




177,268.40 




121,196.98 




23,402.88 




4,714.43 




10,063,210.45 




850,395.58 


Steam locomotives — retirements - 


65,881.77 


Other locomotives — repairs.. . __ 


274,082.88 




34,958.34 




5,790,826.09 


Freight-train cars — depreciation _. 


1,771,067.93 




3,466,333.58 




810,470.29 




115,956.48 




2,306.80 


Floating equipment — repairs- 


2,560.21 


Floating equipment— depreciation 


498.74 


Work equipment — repairs _ 


188,359.85 


Work equipment — depreciation . 


51,228.95 




17,960.66 




12,400.57 




2,240.04 




R 275 .00 


Injuries to persons _ _ . ..... .. 


86,015.08 


Insurance . 


68,168.99 


Stationery and printing... . 


54,272.70 


Other expenses. . . 


1,630.14 






Totals.. 


23,506,278.23 

20,013.33 

R 1,449.23 


25,108,313.29 




30,250.34 




673 .35 








23,524,842.33 


25,137,890.28 







230 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES-ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Traffic: 

Superintendence - 

Outside agencies 

Advertising _ „ 

Traffic associations -. 

Industrial and immigration bureaus 

Stationery and printing. 

Other expenses.. 

Total traffic 

Transportation — Rail Line: 

Superintendence 

Dispatching trains. .. 

Station employees 

Weighing, inspection, and demurrage bureaus 

Coal and ore wharves. 

Station supplies and expenses 

Yardmasters and yard clerks. 

Yard conductors and brakemen 

Yard switch and signal tenders. 

Yard enginemen 

Fuel for yard locomotives 

Water for yard locomotives... 

Lubricants for yard locomotives 

Other supplies for yard locomotives 

Engineh ouse expenses — yard 

Yard supplies and expenses 

Train enginemen 

Train motormen 

Fuel for train locomotives... 

Train power produced... 

Water for train locomotives 

Lubricants for train locomotives 

Other supplies for train locomotives 

Enginehouse expenses — train 

Trainmen- 

Train supplies and expenses 

Signal and interlocker operation 

Crossing protection 

Drawbridge operation 

Telegraph and telephone operation 

Operating floating equipment 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Insurance 

Clearing wrecks 

Damage to property 



$ 274,480.62 


$ 299,221.09 


445,034.14 


488,944.37 


21,786.88 


34,360.27 


16,836.63 


16,174.51 


13,007.64 


13,204.26 


161,043.35 


139,900.00 


906 .41 








933,095.77 


991,805.30 


949,551.22 


859,456.24 


525,514.86 


546,083.77 


3,334,581.26 


3,622,298.48 


47,590.81 


53,779.82 


158,739.49 


141,824.55 


196,652.00 


202,905.82 


973,768.67 


912,808.59 


1,530,622.85 


1,736,657.49 


164,402.03 


174,489.25 


744,689.61 


884,216.04 


600,379.45 


874,100.20 


41,533.00 


44,274.96 


7,528.12 


R 233 .40 


23,943.72 


25,754.38 


555,466.39 


621,360.04 


102,301.89 


99,890.35 


3,566,519.38 


3,706,535.01 


102,037.31 


97,077.34 


5,999,127.79 


7,625,587.59 


284,685.48 


326,839.30 


410,846.99 


436,900.15 


205,454.58 


180,094.61 


146,412.33 


153,607.86 


2,242,603.59 


2,318,120.65 


3,253,927.22 


3,360,898.31 


1,028,921.92 


1,049,764.11 


348,202.11 


356,535.46 


166,304.96 


172,760.16 


8,339.99 


7,745.27 


71,850.08 


85,232.09 


703 .79 


247 .54 


149,613.39 


161,104.17 


34,054.82 


21,482.96 


34,709.76 


31,610.65 


351,735.37 


414,516.42 


48,281.27 


51,884.77 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



231 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Name of Railway Operating 


I Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Transportation— Rail Line— Con. 


$ 47,234.44 

540,168.77 

1,751.74 

130,862.75 


$ 52,329.20 




404,102.30 




1,325.58 




214,713.61 








Totals 


29,132,215.30 

468,931.11 

R 424,280.69 

45,353.77 

R 83,012.52 


32,030,6&1.69 




-Dr 


506,270.05 




-Cr 


R 463,678.34 




-Dr 


48,873.14 




-Cr 


R 93,405.87 










29,139,206.97 


32,028,740.67 








Miscellaneous Operations: 


194,976.41 

38,295.92 

8,428.76 

14,560.78 

21,619.14 

268.62 


224,808.36 


Hotels and restaurants. - 


35,458.17 




8,646.31 




13,703.25 


Producing power sold _ 


23,499.09 


Other miscellaneous operations - 


267 .00 








Total miscellaneous operations.. 


278,149.63 


306,382.18 




3rs 




General: 


197,642.42 

808,035.45 
48,123.46 

238,691.60 

986.43 

95,484.44 

200,742.27 
59,110.82 
61,239.11 
61,968.88 


201,568.87 




836,558.85 






49,700.19 


Law expenses 


240,375.30 


Insurance... 


813 .45 


Relief department expenses 


116,539.49 


Pensions 


211,262.52 




60,604.09 


Valuation expenses 


71,663.07 


Other expenses 


77,744.49 








Totals 


1,772,024.88 

2,143.01 

R 459 .52 


1,866,830.32 


General joint facilities — Dr . 


1,843.69 


General joint facilities — Cr _ 


718.89 










1,773,708.37 


1,867,955.12 








Transportation for investment — Cr 


R 118,093.29 


R 115,567.66 








Grand total railway operating es 


67,977,201.90 


72,623,799.17 









Operating ratio (ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues), 1922, 75.27 per cent; 1923, 
76.05 per cent. 



232 



N. C. COKPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




2,237.88 


2,238.29 






Train-miles: 
Freight — 


9,526,913 
185,261 


9,977,366 


Light . 


143,963 








9,712,174 

4,618,481 

218,632 

3,761 


10,121,329 




4,741,702 




248,056 
4,746 










14,553,048 


15,115,833 








309,319 


396,316 






Locomotive-miles : 
Freight- 


9,712,174 

2,281,072 

458,411 


10,121,329 




2,683,126 


Light. . 


449,532 








12,451,657 


13,253,987 






Passenger — 


4,618,481 
72,745 
116,493 


4,741,702 




96,419 


Light 


117,714 








4,807,719 


4,9*55,835 






Mixed train — 


218,632 

507 

20,335 


248,056 




2,967 


Light. .-- 


21,115 








239,474 


272,138 






Special — 


3,761 

474 

80 


4,746 




681 


Light - 


186 








4,315 


5,613 








409,976 


485,283 






Yard switching- 


2,726,325 
233,455 


3,199,622 




235,938 








2,959,780 


3,435,560 








20,872,921 


22,408,416 








310,830 


397,859 







NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



233 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-ENTIRE LINE— Continued 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Car-miles: 
Freight train — 


266,666,654 
184,970,909 


289,105,028 




180,866,044 








451,637,563 

9,666,083 

475,415 


469,971,072 




10,064,749 




511,760 








461,779,061 


480,547,581 






Passenger train — 


12,001,252 

5,787,913 

949,521 

9,889,222 


12,812,545 




6,109,794 


Dining.. ... . . 


1,021,461 


Other 


10,141,050 








28,627,908 


30,084,850 






Mixed train — 


534,203 

208,596 

3,539 

392,530 

129,856 


764,715 


Freight — empty _ 


332,452 




5,670 




454,958 




127,824 








1,268,724 


1,685,619 






Special train — 


31,609 

3,808 

5,097 

4,570 

156 

36 


53,404 




4,468 


Passenger .. 


2,032 


Sleeping, parlor, and observation 


16,721 


Dining . 




Other passenger-train . 


75 






Total special train car-miles 


45,276 


76,700 






Total transportation service car-miles 


491,720,969 


512,394,750 






Work service 


1,452,424 


1,565,982 






Freight Service: 
Tons- 
Revenue freight _ _. 


37,357,078 
4,288,376 


42,574,883 


Nonrevenue freight 


4,878,402 






Total tons, freight service 


41,645,454 


47,453,285 






Ton-miles — 
Revenue freight. 


10,422,300,577 

674,885,444 


11,161,523,332 


Nonrevenue freight 


789,819,905 






Total ton-miles, freight service 


11,097,186,021 


11,951,343,237 







234 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


6,034,531 


6,243,478 


261,756,223 


296,043,981 


$77,637,430.88 


S 81,320,794.26 


9,192,599.00 


10,194,497.03 


11,454,925.12 


12,545,390.15 


90,314,742.34 


95,494,687.26 


67,977,201.90 


72,623,799.17 


22,337,540.44 


22,870,888.09 


4,340 


4,522 


2,064 


2,118 


98 


111 


2 


2- 


6,503 


6,753 


138 


177 


9,327 


10,007 


206,696 


215,213 


13,030 


13,710 


$ 34,692.40 


$ 36,331.66 


5,118.65 


5,604.90 


40,357.27 


42,664.13 


30,375.71 


32,446.11 


9,981.56 


10,218.02 


4,657,220 


4,986,629 


4,958,794 


5,339,497 


116,966 


132,263 


27.46 


28.56 


2.44 


3.08 


19.05 


17.87 


.95 


1.34 


1,059.09 


1,085.37 


1,127.67 


1,162.17 


6.20 


6.34 


2.39 


2.35 


55.59 


61 .33; 


$ 7.89 


$ 7:91 


2.43 


2.60 


6.21 


6.31 


4.67 


4.80 


1.54 


1.51 



Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried— revenue 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages Per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles 

Mixed-train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles.. 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car- miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues. 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight . 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles— freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles. 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 



NOEFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



235 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 



Amount, 1923 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train- miles — freight trains 

Car- miles — freight trains. 

Train- miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train- miles — mixed trains 

Car-miles — mixed trains. 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car- miles — special trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton- miles — all freight 

Freight revenue.. 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight.. 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled— all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers __. 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent) 



.78 

37.09 

.96 

5.95 

.91 

5.30 

.87 

10.49 



278.99 

157 .38 

266 .47 

43.38 

2 .07825 

.00745 

1 .52333 

.03512 

75.27 



.76 

36.36 

.96 

5.07 

.91 

6.19 

.87 

13.66 





39.01 




38.51 




41.53 




41.23 


$ 


0.29056 


$ 


.28054 




14.40 




15.28 


s 


.50560 


$ 


0.52611 



262.16 

161.90 

251 .85 

47.42 

1 .91007 

.00729 

1.63282 

.03444 

76.05 



236 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS-WITHIN THE STATE 




Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




131.05 


131 .05 






Tkain-miles: 
Freight- 


299,237 
3,343 


317,701 


Light 


3,195 








302,580 

224,644 

30,860 

163 


320,896 




205,930 




31,496 




244 








558,247 


558,556 








7,378 


8,500 






LOCOMOTIVE-MILES I 

Freight- 


282,829 

136,330 

10,314 


320,896 




190,144 


Light 


12,428 






Total freight locomotive-miles 


429,473 


523,468 






Passenger — 


204,600 
1,361 
1,581 


205,930 




1,404 


Light 


1,873 








207,542 


209,207 






Mixed train — 


30,860 
163 


31,496 


HelpeT . . . 


440 


Light 


2 








Total mixed train locomotive-miles 


31,023 


31,938 






Special — 


163 
61 
5 


244 




74 


Light 


21 








229 


339 








22,355 


27,340 






Yard switching — 


51,369 
4,673 


61,906 




4,709 








56,042 


66,615 








746,664 


858,907 








7,454 


8,542 







NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



237 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continu 


ed 


Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 


Car-miles: , 
Freight train — 


4,185,747 
1,677,363 


5,377,391 




2,097,628 








5,863,110 

283,027 

25,534 


7,475,020 




320,407 




19,396 








6,171,671 


7,814,823 






Passenger train- 


510,207 

33,429 

46 

323,557 


536,642 




34,867 




92 


Other .. ._. __ .. _ _ . 


331,758 








867,239 


903,359 






Mixed train- 
Freight — loaded . __ ... ... . __ 


66,417 

7,009 

85 

71,100 

31,236 


73,211 




12,095 




249 




76,054 


Other passenger-train 


29,410 




175,847 


191,019 






Special train- 


1,204 


1,857 


Caboose . 


244 




163 






191 




135 
330 


524 










Total special train car-miles 


1,832 


2,816 








7,216,589 


8,912,017 






Work service __ __ 


43,666 


53,547 






Freight Service: 
Tons- 
Revenue freight ______ 


1,626,360 
102,712 


2,057,617 


Nonrevenue freight ■ 


163,966 






Total tons, freight service . 


1,729,072 


2,221,583 






Ton-miles — 


93,140,090 
3,912,331 


121,666,880 


Nonrevenue freight _ __ 


6,584,651 






Total ton-miles, freight service 


97,052,421 


128,251,531 







238 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 



Amount, 1923 



Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried — revenue 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses . 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles ' 

Mixed- train miles 

Special-train miles 

Transportation service train-miles 

Work-train miles 

Locomotive-miles — transportation 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

T on-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles— all freight .jl 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Averages per Train-mile: 

Loaded freight car-miles— freight trains 

Loaded freight car-miles — mixed trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — mixed trains , 

Ton-miles — revenue freight _. 

Ton-miles — all freight.... 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Passenger train car-miles — mixed trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses. . 

Net operating revenues 



212,104 
5,026,682 



216,721 
5,517,431 



$ 1,000,271.90 


$ 


1,266,755.96 


174,287.38 




186,191.32 


259,408.42 




267,985.43 


1,291,820.65 




1,575,740.71 


1,619,841.23 




1,795,948.82 


R 328,020.58 


R 


220,208.11 


2,309 




2,449 


1,714 




1,571 


235 




240 

2 


4,260 




4,262 


56 




65 


5,698 




6,554 


47,665 




60,301 


7,402 




7,703 


% 7,632.75 


$ 


9,666.20 


1,979.46 




2,044.91 


9,857.46 




12,023.97 


12,360.48 




13,704.30 


R 2,503.02 


R 


1,680.33 


710,722 




928,400 


740,576 




978,646 


38,357 




42,102 


13.83 




16.76 


2.15 




2.32 


5.54 




6.54 


.23 




.38 


295 .23 




363.18 


307 .64 




382 .84 


3.86 




4.39 


3.32 




3.35 


20.72 




24.71 


$ 3.17 


S 


3.78 


1.07 




1.20 


2.31 




2.82 


2.90 




3.21 


R .59 


R 


.39 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



239 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 



Amount, 1923 



Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles^f reight trains. . _ . . . 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Train-miles — mixed trains. 

Car-miles — mixed trains 

Train-miles — special trains 

Car-miles — special trains _ _ . 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton- miles — revenue freight. . 

Ton- miles — all freight 

Freight revenue 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight.. 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight.. 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight. 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent) 



.70 

14.37 

1.08 

4.18 

.99 
5.67 

.71 
8.00 



57.27 
38.09 
56.13 
23.70 
0.61504 
.01074 
.82171 
.03467 
125 .39 



14.93 
.98 

4.32 
.99 

5.98 
.72 

8.31 





21.90 




22.32 




22.82 




23.53 


$ 


0.23524 


$ 


.23241 




8.18 




8.52 


s 


0.28352 


$ 


0.28753 



59.13 
40.16 
57.73 
25.46 
0.61564 
.01041 
.85913 
.03375 
113.97 



240 



N. C. COEPOBATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— ENTIRE LINE 



Commodity 



1922 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



1923 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



Products of Agriculture: 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Other grain 

Flour and meal 

Other mill products 

Hay, straw, and alfalfa 

Tobacco 

Cotton 

Cotton seed and products, except oil 

Citrus fruits 

Other fresh fruits 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Dried fruits and vegetables 

Other products of agriculture 

Totals 

Animals and Products: 

Horses and mules 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep and goats 

Hogs 

Fresh meats 1 

Other packing-house products 

Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 

Wool 

Hides and leather 

Other animals and products 

Totals 

Products of Mines: 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Coke 

Iron ore 

Other ores and concentrates 

Base bullion and matte 

Clay, gravel, sand, and stone 

Crude petroleum 

Asphaltum 

Salt 

Other products of mines 

Totals 



3,431 
4,462 
1,822 

635 
9,396 
7,428 
13,894 
6,896 
1,943 
1,552 
1,058 
3,718 
3,690 
3,453 

317 
5,064 



115,259 
148,918 
47,766 
19,087 
186,610 
155,728 
171,912 
74,019 
26,450 
30,926 
14,546 
51,014 
65,601 
47,199 
6,332 
77,661 



1,759 



1,243,028 



531 
5,618 

908 
1,239 
2,998 

689 
42 

353 

374 

168 
1,116 

545 



5,875 

63,491 

8,121 

11,072 

41,337 

10,180 

493 

3,833 

4,367 

1,889 

24,586 

13,013 



14,581 



.257 



123 

503,748 

11,860 

9,001 

235 

4 

26,539 

102 

698 

1,477 

1,276 



5,582 

,120,614 

377,185 

524,732 

9,826 

145 

,401,247 

3,430 

22,024 

34,718 

44,730 



3,977 
4,131 
1,901 
1,294 

10,101 
7,408 

16,064 
8,531 
1,831 
1,168 
1,131 
5,980 
4,025 
3,509 
407 
4,168 



75,626 



544 

4,812 

953 

1,676 

2,896 

1,079 

45 

318 

399 

178 

1,314 

528 



14,742 



192 

497,880 

20,291 

12,769 

604 



44,942 

65 

1,450 

1,455 

1,993 



148,131 

133,120 

52,685 

45,691 

203,325 

158,255 

202,207 

87,694 

22,853 

22,913 

16,158 

84,119 

72,104 

45,958 

7,940 

65,364 



,517 



5,950 

54,440 

7,734 

15,106 

39,559 

15,762 

560 

3,360 

5,678 

2,071 

28,928 

11,490 



190,638 



9,020 

29,468,395 

666,096 

766,559 

26,611 



2,357,709 

2,508 

19,672 

35,177 

72,376 



555,063 



30,544,233 



581,641 



33,454,123 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



241 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Commodity 



1922 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



1923 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood. 
Ties 



Pulp wood. 

Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and headings. 
Other products of forests 



Totals. 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, syrup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 

Other metals, pig, bar, and sheet 

Castings, machinery, and boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 

automobiles 

Automobiles and autotrucks 

Household goods and second-hand furniture 

Furniture ( new ) 

Beverages 

Ice. 



Fertilizers (all kinds) 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives 

Textiles. 

Canned goods (all canned food products). 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 



Totals. 



Grand totals, carload traffic. 
Merchandise — all L. C. L. freight. . 



Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic. 



10,891 
2,633 
1,160 

41,388 
2,307 



58,379 



7,066 

118 

2,342 

34 

4,093 

936 

10,490 

1,497 

2,487 

7,509 

7,648 

6,827 

1,107 

1,053 

8,109 

1,207 

2,528 

462 

757 

7,103 

724 

10,919 

1,500 

2,167 

36,265 



124,948 



347,383 

79,456 

29,850 

1,046,754 

41,155 



1,544,598 



182,075 
2,618 

52,605 

802 

201,044 

32,830 
306,700 

55,007 

43,804 
276,925 
275,709 
167,315 

23,628 

16,655 

48,049 
9,760 

21,231 
8,538 

11.892 
157,939 

16,305 
326,503 

19,342 

44,408 
818,102 



15,701 
3,823 
2,690 

62,297 
3,085 



87,596 



11,772 

163 

2,321 

22 

7,119 

1,444 

16,596 
1,924 
4,319 

10,502 

10,028 
8,593 
1,498 

3,855 

21,409 

1,337 

3,817 

612 

884 

7,105 

990 

10,968 

1,572 

2,863 

49,684 



3,119,786 



181,397 



821,730 



36,639,902 
717,176 



941,002 



37,357.078 



941,002 



475,423 
110,528 

79,588 
,588,348 

57,387 



2,311,274 



312,218 
3,751 

53,411 

408 

334,164 

54,782 
499,264 

69,531 

78,039 
392,627 
366,113 
220,690 

29,720 

67,632 

122,496 

10,512 

29,350 

11,210 

13,764 

159,609 

23,707 

325,263 

16,373 

61,698 

,223,909 



4,480,241 



41,804,793 
770,090 



42,574,883 



Part II— 16 



242 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— 


WITHfN THE STATE 






1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat. . . - 


5 

2 

1 

1 

6 

6 

6 

1,145 

52 

33 

1 

1 

2 


85 

54 

17 

24 

70 

80 

65 

11,648 

513 

425 

16 

29 

23 


13 
1 

1 


361 
23 






14 


Other grain.. .-. _. . .. 






16 

4 

4 

1,249 

81 

14 

2 

1 


120 




31 




52 




12,066 

785 




Cotton seed and products, except oil 


141 

24 




19 








1 

8 


15 




6 


90 


117 






Totals... 


1,267 


15,139 


1,395 


13,768 






Animals and Products: 


4 

46 
23 
1 
1 
1 
6 


40 

543 

185 

10 

6 

8 

137 


6 
42 
19 

1 


61 




487 




138 




9 






Wool 








2 


28 






Totals 


82 


929 


70 


723 






Products of Mines: 


1 


15 


1 
3 
29 

2 


20 




112 




37 


1,059 


1,011 


Salt 


14 




1 


18 










Totals 


39 


1,092 


35 


1,157 






Products of Forests: 


2,387 
24 
76 

1,393 
174 


65,030 
658 

1,838 
31,444 

2,500 


2,201 
37 

306 
1,653 

212 


53,563 


Ties 


886 




7,821 


Lumber, timber, boxshooks, staves, and headings 


38, 163 
3,357 








4,054 


101,470 






Totals 


4,409 


103, 790 







NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



243- 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— WITHIN THE STATE— Continued 





1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 


3 
3 

4 
3 
3 

7 
1 
5 
4 

78 
3 
2 

5 
5 

20 

297 

1 

24 

186 

1 

3 

152 

14 

463 


79 
36 
80 

120 
71 

133 
39 
59 
95 
2,618 
48 
77 

49 

35 

191 

2,160 

8 

317 

3,596 

29 

50 

1,496 

124 

6,522 


7 
1 


204 




13 








1 

2 
11 

5 
34 

7 
248 

3 


55 




31 


Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe- 


244 

72 




588 




208 


Brick and artificial stone 


8,478 


Lime and plaster __ . 


42 






Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 
automobiles 


14 

27 

28 

391 


138 


Automobiles and auto trucks 


468 


Household goods and second-hand furniture 


183 
2,595 








7 

246 

1 

7 

240 

32 

629 


109 




4,808 


Paper, printed matter, and books. 


23 




119 


Textiles . . 


2,179 


Canned goods (all canned food products).. . 


480 




10,362 






Totals.. 


1,287 


18,032 


1,941 


31,399 






Grand totals, carload traffic .. 






7,850 


150,837 


Merchandise — all L. C. L. freight ... 




55,913 


55,334 










Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic 


6,729 


190,575 


7,850 


206,171 



244 



N. C. COKPOBATION COMMISSION 







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NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



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246 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



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NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



247 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 

OTHER THAN U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 





Name of State 


Amount Charged to 
Tax Accruals" in 


"Railway 
Income 




1922 


1923 




$ 1,786,927.30 

1,153,837.16 

20,020.22 

71,545.74 

709,180.98 

7,000.00 

10.60 

4.00 


$ 


1 
1 


,893,392.99 




,294,485.94 




17,622.12 




77,272.25 


Ohio 


740,686.12 




8,000.00 


Georgia 


10.95 




7.77 


Tennessee . . 


8.78 


Florida _ 




5.63 


Texas 




3.45 










Totals 


3,747,526.00 




4 


,031,496.00 







U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 






Kind of Tax 


Amount Charg 
Tax Accrual 


sd to "Railway 
3" in Income 




1922 


1923 


U. S. income .. 


$ 2,100,000.00 
152,474.00 


$ 2,025,000.00 


Capital stock . 


168,504.00 






Total U. S. Government taxes 


2,252,474.00 


2,193,504.00 






Grand totals 


6,000,000.00 


6,225,000.00 







24:8 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 



Class of Employees 



Average Number 

of Employees in 

Service 



1922 



1923 



Compensation 



1922 



1923 



Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 

Executives, general officers, and assistants 

Division officers, assistants, and staff assistants 

Totals 

Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Architectural, chemical, and engineering assistants (A) 
Architectural, chemical, and engineering assistants (B) 
Subprofessional engineering and laboratory assistants 

Professional and subprofessional legal assistants 

Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments) 

Chief clerks (minor departments) and assistant chief 

clerks and supervising cashiers 

Clerks and clerical specialists (A) 

Clerks (B) 

Clerks (C) 

Mechanical device operators (office) 

Stenographers and secretaries (A) 

Stenographers and typists (B) 

Storekeepers, sales agents, and buyers 

Ticket agents and assistant ticket agents 

Traveling auditors or accountants 

Telephone switchboard operators and office assistants 

Messengers and office boys 

Elevator operators and other office attendants 

Patrolmen 

Watchmen (without police authority) 

Supervising traffic agents 

Traffic agents, advertising and development agents . 
Fire prevention, smoke, and time-service inspectors 

and office building superintendents 

Claim agents and claim investigators 

Real estate and tax agents and investigators 

Examiners, instructors, and special investigators 

Miscellaneous trades workers (other than plumbers). 

Motor vehicle and motor car operators 

Janitors and cleaners 



Totals- 
Daily basis... 
Hourly basis. 



80 



179 



97 

171 

1,374 

203 

39 

39 

216 

38 

18 

7 

23 

74 

7 

2 

36 



81 
104 



S 691,901 
389,149 



$ 631,290 
423,187 



185 



981,050 



452 
2,304 



44 

3 

52 

108 

179 
1,465 

212 
39 
43 

235 
56 
19 
7 
23 
79 



96,029 
91,587 
53,614 
8,740 
155,019 

232,206 

331,827 
2,133,846 

259,941 
50,381 
80,780 

339,961 
74,032 
37,410 
21,545 
16,700 
47,330 
7,131 
1,886 
39,237 
29,116 

233,160 

7,973 
65,257 
2,784 



1,704 
66,134 



2,381 



1,044,360 
3,440,970 



1,054,477 



121,046 
110,421 
80,498 
7,418 
160,026 

260, 688 

358,208 

2,267,843 

269,441 

50,331 

90,907 

371,483 

100,993 

39,904 

22,503 

16,796 

50,690 

7,461 



1,076 
37,532 
29,874 

252,886 
8,593 

66,665 
2,868 
1,788 
1,612 

64,729 



1,174,176 
3,680,104 



NORFOLK AND WESTERN RAILWAY 



249 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION— Continued 



Class of Employees 



Average Number 

of Employees in 

Service 



1922 



1923 



Compensation 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Roadmasters and general foremen 

Supervising maintenance of way inspectors and scale 

inspectors 

Maintenance of way inspectors 

Bridge and building gang foremen 

Bridge and building carpenters 

Bridge and building ironworkers 

Bridge and building painters 

Masons, bricklayers, plasterers, and plumbers 

Skilled trades helpers 

Regular apprentices 

Portable steam equipment operators 

Portable steam equipment operator helpers 

Pumping equipment operators 

Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers).. 
Gang foremen (bridge and building, signal and tele- 
graph laborers) 

Gang and section foremen 

Laborers (extra gang and work-train) 

Track and roadway section laborers 

Maintenance of way laborers (other than track and 

roadway) and gardeners and farmers 

General foremen and supervising inspectors (signal, 

telegraph, and electrical transmission) 

Assistant general foremen (signal, telegraph, and elec- 
trical transmission) and signal and telegraph in- 
spectors 

Gang foremen (signal and telegraph skilled trades 

labor). 

Signalmen and signal maintainers 

Linemen and groundmen 

Assistant signalmen and assistant signal maintainers. 
Signalman and signal maintainer helpers 



Totals- 
Daily basis... 
Hourly basis. 



37 

5 

2 

58 

279 



48 
15 
53 

1 
23 

4 
132 
32 



401 



106 

9 



11 

103 
46 

22 



47 
5,802 



2 
73 
402 
2 
33 
21 
158 



31 

4 

136 



396 

920 

4,135 



11 
106 
65 
15 
26 



$ 100,717 

11,325 

5,472 

105,903 

380,987 

47 

70,039 

26,849 

58,135 

243 

45,466 

5,255 

147,368 

50,054 

411 

593,041 

549,761 

3,381,180 

87,724 

26,556 



1,050 

24,755 
191,201 
77,103 
10,052 
23,040 



$ 107,415 

15,226 

5,638 

130,763 

572,725 

2.346 

46,249 

34,622 

175,448 



128,323 
5,845,411 



60,246 

4,831 

159,439 

87,052 



616,983 

882,136 

3,880,296 

60,657 

31,310 



5,308 

30,070 
191,255 
112,994 

19,144 

24,776 



144,031 
7,121,333 



250 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Piedmont and Northern Railway Company 



PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President. . - 

Vice-President 


W. S. Lee 

J. B. Duke 

N. A. Cocke 

E. Thomason 

J. C. McGowan 


Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 
511 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 
Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 
Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 




N. A. Cocke 


Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 


General Solicitor 

Auditor 


W. S. O'B. Robinson 

E. B. Hardin 


Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 
Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 
Mercantile Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 


Superintendent Motive Power 


A. D. Frye 


Greenville, S. C. 



DIRECTORS 

J. B. Duke, 511 5th Avenue, New York, N. Y. ; Pierpont V. Davis, 55 Wall Street, New 
York, N. Y. ; W. S. Lee, Charlotte, N. C. ; E. Thomason, Charlotte, N. C. ; S. W. Cramer, 
Charlotte, N. C. ; A. J. Draper, Charlotte, N. C. ; W. S. Montgomery, Spartanburg, S. C. ; 
V. M. Montgomery, Spartanburg, S. C. ; A. W. Smith, Greenville, S. C. ; John A. Law, 
Spartanburg, S. C. ; C. E. Hutchison, Mount Holly, N. C. ; E. A. Smith, Greenville, S. C. ; 
W. E. Beattie, Greenville, S. C. ; B. B. Gossett, Charlotte, N. C. ; R. E. Sigon, Anderson, 
S. C. ; J. T. Woodside, Greenville, S. C. ; J. P. Gossett, Williamston, S. C. ; L. D. Blake, 
Belton, S. C. ; J. C. Self, Greenwood, S. C. ; J. D. Hammett, Anderson, S. C. ; J. W. Arrington, 
Greenville, S. C. ; A. F. McKissich, Greenville, S. C. ; B. E. Geer, Greenville, S. C. ; J. H. 
Separk, Gastonia, N. C. ; C. C. Armstrong, Gastonia, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Date of organization, November 17, 1913. Greenville, Spartanburg and Anderson Rail- 
way Company, chartered under chapter L of the Code of Laws of South Carolina, 1902. 
March 10, 1910, amended May 9, 1911, and February 20, 1910. 

Piedmont Traction Company, chartered under the Laws of North Carolina, Revisal of 
1905, amended February 9, 1914. 

The properties of the above-named companies were purchased by the Piedmont and North- 
ern Railway Company, in accordance with a resolution of the stockholders of the Piedmont 
Traction Company, April 25, 1914, and of the Greenville, Spartanburg and Anderson Rail- 
way Company, April 24, 1914, and of the Piedmont and Northern Railway Company, 
May 18, 1914. 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN RAILWAY 



251 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$15,516,072.26 


Investments: 


$15,591,324.89 
1,649.91 

123,500.00 
500 .00 


$ 15,581,220.39 


553 .60 


Deposits in lieu of mortgaged property sold 

Investments in affiliated companies — 


15,572.44 
123,500.00 








11,500.00 








Total investments .. 






15,528,125.86 


15,716,974.80 


15,760,292.83 




Current Assets: 
Cash 




297,098.96 


624,735.15 

168,640.02 

155,241.71 

55,269.58 

294,780.16 

5,269.31 

75.00 


581,967.86 


168,855.02 




161,617.52 


5,741.71 




655.000.00 


85,974.53 




199,807.12 


292,525.90 




415,474.94 


1,350.00 




17,550.72 


25.00 




125 .00 




Total current assets . .. 




851,571.12 


1,304,010.93 


2,031,543.16 




Deferred Assets: 




1,345,916.03 


287 .28 


1 , 265 .04 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance.. 
Other unadjusted debits. _ 




12,807.69 
79,197.27 


1,829.73 
58,739.09 


27,849.22 
100,377.19 




Total unadjusted debits... 




92,004.96 


60,568.82 


128,226.41 








17,817,617.97 


17,081,841.83 


17,921,327.44 









252 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— 1 


Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 8,584,600.00 


Stock: 
Capital stock. 


$ 8,584,600.00 


$ 8,584,600.00 




Long-term Debt: 




6,241,200.00 


6,244,200.00 


6,271,600.00 




Current Liabilities: 




121,430.84 


110,672.50 
153,886.46 
270,438.47 
168,640.02 
38,700.00 
10,587.13 


110,672.50 


114,968.66 
184,432.18 


Audited accounts and wages payable 


285,709.69 
353,980.07 


168,855.02 
41,700.00 


Interest matured, dividends and rents unpaid 


161,617.52 
11,300.00 


9,641.63 


Accrued interest, dividends and rents payable 


10,587.13 


641,028.33 


752,924.58 


934,166.91 




Deferred Liabilities: 




1,402,336.08 


2,992.63 


3,871.74 




Unadjusted Credits: 
Operating reserves. 




14,932.13 


18,001.26 

192,943.05 

16,316.45 


106,313.58 


120,166.34 
26,766.15 


Accrued depreciation — road and equipment 


206,293.04 
7,391.27 








161,864.62 


227,260.76 


319,997.89 




Corporate Surplus: 




786,588.94 


1,269,863.86 


1,807,090.90 




Grand totals ._ 




17,817,617.97 


17,081,841.83 


17,921,327.44 









PIEDMONT AND NORTHEEN EAILWAY 



253 



ROAD OPERATED 



State 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 
Second 
Main 

Track 


Miles of 

Yard 

Track and 

Sidings, 

Etc. 


Total 


1922— 


26.69 
101 .20 


3.70 


25.43 
48.25 


55.82 




149 .45 








Totals 


127.89 


3.70 


73.68 


205.27 


1923— 


26.69 
101.20 


3.70 


26.93 
49.03 


57.32 




150 .23 






Totals 


127.89 


3.70 


75.96 


207.55 







RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 


Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Freight ... ... 


$ 1,426,806.17 

426,981.10 

1,646.76 

30.00 

474.76 

48,850.00 

881.47 

10,156.35 


$ 1,887,610.60 


Passenger... ._ . . 


390,282.11 


Baggage. 


1,537.01 


Parlor, sleeping, and dining car 

Mail... . 


808 .37 
425.67 




52,500.00 


Milk... 


463.68 


Switching 


13,040.15 








1,915,826.61 


2,346,667.59 








4,580.12 

1,508.84 
12,837.50 

4,654.69 

44,003.72 

606.10 

5,800.52 


4,672.32 


Storage.. 


2,181.90 


Demurrage... 


31,484.88 


Rent of track facilities . . . ... . 


4,654.69 


Rent of equipment . 


40,690.03 


Power 


557.62 


Rents of buildings and other property . ... 


6,209.94 






Total incidental operating revenues 


73,991.49 


99,451.38 






Total railway operating revenues _. 


1,989,818.10 


2,446,118.97 







254 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Way and Structures: 

Superintendence of way and structures 

Ballast 

Ties 

Rails 

Rail fastenings and joints 

Special work . . : _ . 

Track and roadway labor 

Miscellaneous track and roadway expenses. 

Paving. 

Cleaning and sanding track 

Removal of snow and ice 

Bridges, trestles, and culverts.. 

Crossings, fences, and signs 

Signal and interlocking apparatus 

Telephone and telegraph lines -.1.-- 

Miscellaneous way expenses 

Poles and fixtures 

Distribution system... 

Buildings, fixtures, and grounds 

Depreciation of way and structures 



Total way and structures. 



Equipment: 

Superintendence of equipment 

Passenger and combination cars... 

Freight, express, and mail cars 

Service equipment 

Electric equipment of cars 

Locomotives 

Shop equipme nt 

Shop expenses 

Vehicles and horses 

Miscellaneous e quipment expenses. 

Depreciation of equipment 

Equipment retired 



Total equipment. 



Power: 

Superintendence of power 

Power plant buildings, fixtures, and grounds. 

Substation equipment 

Transmission syste m 



Miscellaneous pow r plant supplies and expenses. 
Substation emplo ees 



Substation supplies and expenses. 

Power purchased 

Power exchanged — balance 

Power transferred — Cr _. 

Total power 



14,735.33 

6,501.68 

86,993.97 

250 .88 

1,019.75 

1,847.29 

58,447.98 

3,140.28 

227 .02 

271.26 

137.85 

10,482.27 

10,027.44 

155 .69 

3,178.38 



11,293.65 
24,770.43 
12,850.40 



245,859.7! 



10,232.15 

37,519.80 

21,206.45 

2,712.29 

10,161.12 

29,016.45 

325 .97 

9,948.77 

25.00 



27,089.22 
3,240.70 



151,510.92 



6,110.31 

7.20 

4,348.86 

47.48 

12,000.00 

15,179.18 

772 .43 

147,883.22 

695 .53 

6,593.35 



180,450.86 



15,613.97 

8,768.53 

90,937.30 

1,311.60 

1,386.88 

4,044.38 

70,144.85 

11,093.94 

959.63 

416.79 

105 .08 

9,812.79 

11,722.91 

220 .76 

2,722.80 

3,456.61 

17, 132 .54 

20,816.43 



15,603./ 



279,358.33 



10,509.59 

35,508.43 

24,182.63 

1,720.32 

14,794.68 

31,860.11 

1,130.20 

14,032.05 

61.51 

206.12 

26,003.24 

736 .30 



160,746.18 



6,277.02 

114.92 

6,458.37 

11.50 

12,000.00 

17,480.62 

1,206.19 

172,377.18 

1,766.17 

6,561.83 



207, 597 .$ 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN RAILWAY 



255 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Conducting Transportation: 

Superintendence of transportation 

Passenger conductors, motormen, and trainmen 

Freight and express conductors, motormen, and trainmen. 

Miscellaneous car-service expenses 

Station employees 

Station expenses 

Carhouse employees 

Carhouse expenses 

Operation of telephone and telegraph lines 

Loss and damage 

Other transportation expenses 



Total conducting transportation. 



Traffic: 
Superintendence and solicitation. 
Advertising 

Miscellaneous traffic expenses 



Total traffic. 



General and Miscellaneous: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of general office clerks. 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Miscellaneous general expenses -. 

Injuries and damages 

Insurance 

Stationery and printing. 

St ore expenses.. i 

Rent of tracks and facilities 

Rent of equipment. .' 



Total general and miscellaneous. 

Recapitulation of Expenses: 

Way and structures 

Equipment 

Power 

Conducting transportation 

Traffic 

General and miscellaneous 



Grand total operating expenses. 



227.06 
593 .09 
508 .67 
342 .81 
522 .85 
251 .90 
247.34 



505 .30 
492.67 
054 .66 



1,259,097 



24,317.62 
44,128.67 
84,960.52 

9,164.25 

95,550.28 

14,756.44 

23,216.70 

5.00 

2,451.29 
10, 129 .83 

7,071.56 



286,746.25 


315,752.16 


36,372.40 


47,616.71 


1,721.07 


3,180.89 


2,495.83 


2,423.34 


40,589.30 


53,220.94 


37,926.74 


36,289.96 


53,648.32 


57,913.57 


4,670.56 


4,671.96 


11,187.01 


8,560.84 


6,388.93 


7,290.76 


20,691.96 


23,015.64 


14,560.93 


17,590.67 


22,723.74 


24,190.06 


5,082.86 


6,844.10 


23,445.92 


29,374.73 


153,612.97 


216,787.74 


353,939.94 


432,530.03 


245,859.79 


279,358.33 


151,510.92 


160,746.18 


180,450.86 


207,597.80 


286,746.25 


315,752.16 


40,589.30 


53,220.94 


353,939.94 


432,530.03 



1,449,205.44 



256 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



MILEAGE, TRAFFIC, AND MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 



Item 



Number or Amount 



1922 



1923 



Passenger car mileage 

Freight, mail, and express car mileage 

Total car mileage 

Regular fare passengers carried 

Passenger revenue 

Average fare, revenue passengers 

Average fare, all passengers (including transfer passengers) 

Total revenue from transportation , 

Revenue from transportation per car-mile 

Total revenue from other railway operations 

Revenue from other railway operations per car-mile 

Total operating revenues 

Operating revenues per car-mile 

Total operating expenses 

Operating expenses per car-mile 



1,132,128 


1,113,359 


2,106,309 


2,693,490 


3,236,437 


3,806,849 


1,117,342 


1,019,623 


$ 426,981.10 


1 390,282.11 


.38214 


.38277 


.38214 


.38277 


1,915,826.61 


2,346,667.59 


.59196 


.61642 


73,991.49 


99,451.38 


.02286 ■ 


.02612 


1,989,818.10 


2,446,118.97 


.61482 


.64253 


1,259,097.06 


1,449,205.44 


.38904 


.38068 



EMPLOYEES 



Class 



General Administration: 

General officers 

General office clerks 

Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendents.. 

Other employees 

Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendents 

Other employees 

Power: 

Superintendents 

Other employees 

Transportation: 

Superintendents- 

Other employees 

Totals 

Aggregate salaries and wages paid for the year 



Number 



1922 



9 
50 

175 



90 



1923 



9 
52 

a 

175 



101 



2 




2 


207 




228 


559 


594 


$ 589,594.12 


S 


680,453.73 



PIEDMONT AND NORTHERN RAILWAY 



257 



DESCRIPTION OF EQUIPMENT 










Class 


With Electric 
Equipment 


Without Electric 
Equipment 


Total 
Number 




1922 


1923 


1922 


1923 


1922 


1923 




26 


24 


8 
154 


8 

153 

2 
15 
4 


34 
154 




3? 














153 








2 

15 
11 


2 
15 
11 
16 


fl 








15 








4 






16 














Total equipment of all classes 


42 


40 


190 


182 


232 




222 



Part 11—17 



258 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Raleigh and Charleston Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 








General Manager or Superintendent.. 








Robert L. Nutt. 


New York, N. Y 









DIRECTORS 

S. Davies Warfield, Baltimore, Md. ; George F. Armstrong, Savannah, Ga. ; Charles R. 
Capps, Norfolk, Va. ; F. Sitterding, Richmond, Va. ; Robert L. Nutt, New York, N. Y. ; 
W. Stackhouse, Marion, S. C. ; R. J. Blackwell, Marion, S. C. ; D. Z. Towles, Meggetts, S. C. ; 
A. P. McAllister, Lumberton, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized December 2, 1905. Chartered December 5, 1905, under Laws of South Carolina 
and act of General Assembly entitled "An Act to provide for the formation of railroad, 
steamboat, street railway, and canal companies ; to define the powers and amend the charters 
thereof." Approved February 28, 1899. 

ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 




Marion, S. C _ _. 


21.24 


42.58 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue. - 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue.. 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile .. 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger service train revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile... 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



574,500.00 


$ 574,500.00 


13,492.25 


13,492.25 


550,000.00 


550,000.00 


12,916.86 


12,916.86 


094,642.31 


1,096,915.66 


25,707.90 


25,761.28 


19,025.12 


19,025.12 


446.81 


446.81 


26,154.71 


26,208.10 


133,457.03 


129,053.34 


89,972.16 


97,812.82 


43,484.87 


31,240.52 


3,134.27 


3,030.84 


2,113.01 


2,297.15 


114,928.48 


111,411.56 


16,942.02 


15,732.55 


2,699.12 


2,616.52 


29,032 


27,894 


397 .89 


$ 369 .48 


1,586.53 


1,909.23 


.03618 


.03593 


1,702.42 


2,369.06 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 1; office clerks, 3; station agents, 8; other station men, 
2; enginemen, 3; firemen, 3; conductors, 3; other trainmen, 5; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shop- 
men, 2; telegraph operators, 1; .section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 20; other employees, 1; total, 58. 
Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 1; office clerks, 3; station agents, 8; other station men, 2; 
enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 4; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shop- 
men, 2; telegraph operators, 1; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 16; other employees, 1; total, 50. 



RANDOLPH AND CUMBERLAND RAILWAY 



259 



Randolph and Cumberland Railway Company 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 




L. C. Dilks 


Chicago, 111. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


W. W. Crews 


Carthage, N. C. 


B. M. Fellows . 


New York, N. Y. 




J. S. Crews 


Macon, Ga. 









DIRECTORS 

B. M. Fellows, 949 Broadway, New York, N. Y. ; S. P. McConnell, Carthage, N. C. ; 
D. A. McDonald, Carthage, N. C. ; Mayo McConnell, Carthage, N. C. ; T. B. Tyson, 
Carthage, N. C. ; W. G. Jennings, Carthage, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized June 30, 1906, under Laws of North Carolina, Revisal, chapter 61. 
Private Act of General Assembly of North Carolina, 1911. 



Amendment, 



ROAD OPERATED 



Cameron, N. C, to McConnell, N. C. (miles). 



22.5 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 


1922 


1923 


Capital stock . _. . 


$ 1,000,000.00 

44,444.44 

138,000.00 

6,133.33 

1,229,531.22 

54,645.83 

29,892.25 

1,328.50 

55,974.33 

51,507.51 

49,885.14 

1,622.37 

2,289.20 

2,217.10 

46,733.53 

1,431.64 

2,077.04 

4,676 

$ 63 .62 

3,342.34 

3.06 

935 .00 


$ 1,000,000.00 




4,444.44 


Funded debt... ... .. 


138,000.00 


Funded debt, per mile 


613.33 


Cost of road . _ ... . 


1,229,531.22 


Cost of road, per mile . . .. 


5,464.58 


Cost of equipment __ ._ . . .. 


29,892.25 


Cost of equipment, per mile . 


1,328.50 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile . ... 


6,863.08 


Operating revenue.. . . 


55,668.92 




48,916.44 


Net operating revenue ..... . 


6,752.48 


Operating revenue, per mile .. ..... 


2,474.17 


Operating expenses, per mile... . . 


2,174.64 


Total freight revenue 


51,085.46 


Total passenger-train service revenue .. . 


999 .65 


Freight revenue, per mile .. . . 


2,270.46 


Total number passengers carried earning revenue 


2,842 


Passenger service train revenue, per mile . 


$ 14 .44 


Revenue from other sources 


3,583.81 


Average receipts per passenger, per mile. 


3.00 


Taxes oaid, North Carolina.. 


1,138.29 







Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 2; station agents, 4; other station men, 
2; engin'emen, 2; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 12; 
total, 31. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 1; station agents, 4; other station 
men, 2; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other track- 
men, 11; total, 29. 



260 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Roanoke Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 








General Manager or Superintendent 


P. R. Camp.. 












B. J. Ray... 




Traffic Manager. .. 













DIRECTORS 

J. L. Camp, Franklin, Va. ; T. D. Savage, Franklin, Va. ; J. L. Camp, Jr., Franklin, Va. 
B. J. Ray, Franklin, Va. ; P. R. Camp, Franklin, Va. ; J. M. Camp, Franklin, Va. 



HISTORY 

Organized January 10, 1920, under Laws of Virginia. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From— 


To— 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Thelma, N. C 




5.64 


15- 









CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile... 

Cost of equipment.. 

Cost of equipment, per mile.. 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



50,000.00 


$ 50,000.00 


3,333.33 


3,333.33 


30,744.69 


130,744.69 


8,716.31 


8,716.31 


1,867.00 


1,867.00 


124 .47 


124 .47 


8,840.78 


8,840.78- 


60,551.42 


34,400.80 


53,824.73 


41,982.86 


6,726.69 


•7,582.06 


4,036.76 


2,293.37 


3,588.32 


2,798.85 


59,485.12 


41,982.86 


3,963.43 


2,293.37 


1,066.30 




1,659.47 


828 .37 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 2; station agents, 1; enginemen, 1; fire- 
men, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; trackmen, 8; total, 20. Employees, 1923: Number general 
officers, 5; office clerks, 1; station agents, 1; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 1; other trainmen,. 
1; shopmen, 5; total, 18. 



'Loss. 



ROCKINGHAM RAILROAD 



261 



Rockingham Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




H. C. Wall.. 






J. L. Hawley -.. 


Rockingham, N. C. 




J. LeGrand Everett 


Rockingham, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

William Entwistle, Rockingham, N. C. ; W. L. Parsons, Rockingham, N. C. ; John L. 
Everett, Rockingham, N. C. ; H. C. Wall, Rockingham, N. C. ; F. W. Leak, Rockingham, 
N. C. ; J. LeGrand Everett, Rockingham, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized 1910, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Leak, N. C, to Gibson, N. C. (miles). 



21.4 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock ..- 

Capital stock, per mile - 

Funded debt ..- 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue -- - 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue -.. 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .- 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



72,000.00 


$ 72,000.00 


3,364.48 


3,364.48 


250,000.00 


250,000.00 


11,682.24 


11,682.24 


301,078.93 


304,740.93 


14,069.11 


14,240.23 


18,863.04 


18,863.04 


881 .45 


881 .45 


14,950.56 


15,121.68 


65,457.80 


75,529.81 


59,821.55 


70,139.10 


5,636.25 


5,390.71 


3,058.77 


3,529.43 


2,795.40 


3,277.53 


63,983.95 


74,953.50 


1,473.85 


576.31 


2,989.90 


3,502.50 


1,162 


1,089 


68.87 


$ 26 .93 


.59 


.25 


1,435.32 


2,008.44 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 1; station agents, 2; other station men, 
2; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 2; other shopmen, 1; section 
foremen, 2; other trackmen, 12; other employees, 2; total, 32. Employees, 1923: Number general offi- 
cers, 3; office clerks, 2; station agents, 2; other station men, 1; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 
1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 2; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 16; other 
employees, 6; total, 40. 



262 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Smoky Mountain Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




W. M. Ritter. 






E. B. McCollum 


Proctor, N. C. 










C. B. Weakley . . 











DIRECTORS 

W. M. Ritter, Columbus, Ohio ; S. G. Bernard, Asheville, N. C. ; James L. Hamill, 
Columbus, Ohio ; C. B. Weakley, Columbus, Ohio ; Landon C. Bell, Columbus, Ohio ; R. E. 
Pendleton, Columbus, Ohio. 

HISTORY 

Organized August 2, 1905, under Laws of North Carolina. Private Laws of North Carolina, 
1909, chapter 151. Charter amended by Act ratified February 26, 1909. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Ritter, N. C, to Bone Valley, N. C. (miles ). 



9.6 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock .. 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile - 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue... 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



50,000.00 


% 50,000.00 


5,208.33 


5,208.33 


23,000.00 


23,000.00 


2,395.83 


2,395.83 


8,526.62 


4,325.34 


888.11 


450.35 


3,811.55 


2,696.05 


397 .04 


280 .84 


1,285.22 


731 .18 


43,002.31 


47T469 .30 


49,232.89 


39,152.92 


*6,230.58 


8,316.38 


4,479.40 


4,944.71 


5,128.42 


4,078.43 


42,476.76 


46,871.80 


525 .55 


597 .50 


4,424.66 


4,882.48 


2,768 


3,400 


54.74 


$ 62 .24 


.045 


.042 


974.67 


772 .80 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 2; office clerks, 5; station agents, 2; enginemen, 1; fire- 
men, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 10; other employees, 1; 
total, 26. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 2; office clerks, 4; station agents, 2; enginemen, 
1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 1; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 11; other em- 
ployees, 1; total, 26. 



*Deficit. 



TENNESSEE AND NORTH CAROLINA RAILWAY 



263 



Tennessee and North Carolina Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 

Vice-President and Superintendent 


C. Boice.... 

W. J. Parks 

J. W. Bell 

W. J. Parks • 


Newport, Tenn. 
Newport, Tenn. 
Newport, Tenn. 


Traffic Manager 


Newport, Tenn. 



DIRECTORS 

C. Boice, Newport, Tenn. ; D. R. Noland, Waynesville, N. C. ; W. J. Parks, Newport, 
Tenn. ; D. L. Boyd, Waynesville, N. C. ; J. W. Bell, Newport, Tenn. ; H. S. Mantooth, 
Newport, Tenn. ; F. E. Alley, Waynesville, N. C. 



HISTORY 

The present company was organized on June 26, 1920, to succeed the Tennessee and 
North Carolina Railroad Company, and is a merged corporation. The Tennessee and North 
Carolina Railway Company, a North Carolina corporation, and the Tennessee and North 
Carolina Railway Company, a Tennessee corporation, were merged on June 28, 1920, to 
form one of like name. The old company, known as the Tennessee and North Carolina 
Railroad Company, was incorporated in the states of Tennessee and North Carolina about 
March 6, 1903. On June 27, 1911, these two corporations were merged into the Tennessee 
and North Carolina Railroad Company. On September 13, 1916, company went into the 
hands of a receiver and was operated until June 7, 1920, at which time the road was sold 
by foreclosure proceedings at public auction, and was purchased on behalf of the bondholders, 
and was reorganized on June 26, 1920, under the present name. 



ROAD OPERATED 



From — 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Newport, Tenn 


Chestnut, N. C. 


2.00 
14.95 




22.16 


West Canton, N. C 




14.95 









264 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock.. 

Capital stock, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



50,000.00 


$ 250,000.00 


12,400.00 


12,400.00 


20,911.89 


222,727.38 


10,957.93 


11,047.98 


19,550.00 


19,550.00 


969 .74 


969 .74 


11,927.67 


12,017.72 


74,683.20 


82,683.57 


52,413.22 


54,061.56 


12,269.98 


28,622.01 


4,406.09 


4,878.09 


3,682.19 


3,189.47 


67,000.32 


73,313.73 


5,886.97 


9,682.83 


3,052.80 


4,325.29 


14,016 


19,138 


347.31 


$ 571.26 


4,630.52 


6,980.04 


.025 


.03 


1,597.36 


2,131.44 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 4; office clerks, 3; station agents, 5; other station men, 
1; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 4; machinists, 1; carpenters, 2; other shop- 
men, 5; section foremen, 4; other trackmen, 20; total, 55. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 
4; office clerks, 3; station agents, 5; other station men, 1; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; 
other trainmen, 4; machinists, 1; carpenters, 2; other shopmen, 5; section foremen, 4; other track- 
men, 20; total, 55. 



THE PIGEON RIVER RAILWAY 



265 



The Pigeon River Railway Company 

(Leased to Tennessee and North Carolina Railroad Company) 
OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A. J. Stevens .. 


Philadelphia. Pa. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


W. J. Parks. 




John R. Alloy 


Philadelphia. Pa. 




W. J. Parks 


Newport. Tenn. 







DIRECTORS 

A. J. Stevens, Philadelphia, Pa. ; E. M. Bechtel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pa. ; E. A. Gaskill, Sunburst, N. C. ; R. G. Rogers, Sunburst, N. C. 



F. H. Ely, Philadelphia, 



HISTORY 

Organized November 2, 1906, under Laws of North Carolina, Chapter 61, entitled "Rail- 
roads," Volume 1, Revisal of 1905 of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 




West Canton, N. C, to Spruce, N. C. (miles) 


14.95 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 



40,000.00 

2,675.59 

867,494.54 

58,026.39 

337,186.24 

22,554.27 

1,654.98 

110.70 

22,664.97 



40,000.00 

2,675.59 

867,494.54 

58,026.39 

337,186.24 

22,554.27 

1,654.98 

110.70 

22,664.97 



Note. — Earnings and expenses given by Tennessee and North Carolina Railroad. 



266 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Townsville Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




J. R. Paschall 


Merry Mount, N. C. 
Townsville N C 


General Manager 


S. R. Adams 


W. F. Kinsey 











DIRECTORS 

J. R. Paschall, Merry Mount, N. C. ; R. B. Taylor, Townsville, N. C. ; S. R. Adams, 
Townsville, N. C. ; J. E. Kimball, Townsville, N. C. ; E. M. Thorpe, Townsend, Ga. 



HISTORY 

Organized July 2, 1919, under Laws of North Carolina. North Carolina Revisal 1905, 
Section 2548 and following. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Manson, N. C, to Townsville, N. C. (miles). 



CAPITAL STOCK. ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road -.. 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources. 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



210,000.00 


$ 210,000.00 


19,090.90 


19,000.00 


40,000.00 


40,000.00 


3,333.33 


3,333.33 


252,898.06 


254,109.82 


22,990.73 


21,175.81 


20,673.19 


20,673.19 


1,879.38 


1,722.76 


23,870.11 


22,898.56 


14,581.80 


19,496.56 


8,853.54 


15,398.04 


5,728.26 


4,098.55 


1,215.15 


1,624.71 


737.79 


1,283.17 


13,816.68 


18,660.73 


1,256.00 


1,556.06 


765.72 


728 .86 


750 .00 


720 .00 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 4; station agents, 3; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; section 
foremen, 1; other trackmen, 3; total, 13. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 4; station agents, 
3; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 3; total, 13. 



TTTCKASEEGEE AND SOUTHEASTERN RAILWAY 



26T 



Tuckaseegee and Southeastern Railway Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




Joseph Keys 


Washington, D. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 




East LaPorte, N. C. 


N. M. Davison 


East LaPorte, N. C. 




H. W. Price 


East LaPorte, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

Joseph Keys, Washington, D. C. ; Felix E. Alley, Waynesville, N. C. ; James E. Walker,. 
East LaPorte, N. C. ; N. M. Davison, East LaPorte, N. C. ; H. W. Shields, Bluefield, W. Va. ;. 
M. L. Harrison, East Radford, Va. ; V. R. Rieley, East LaPorte, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Incorporated August 6, 1920, under Laws of North Carolina. 



ROAD OPERATED 




Sylva, N. C, to East LaPorte, N. C. (miles) 


12.26 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock. 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt. . 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile .. 

Operating revenue. . _ 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



300,000.00 
24,469.83 



309,372.82 

25,234.33 

23,287.96 

1,899.51 

27,133.84 

21,264.71 

20,039.63 

1,225.08 

1,734.48 

1,634.55 

19,008.40 

2,256.31 

1,550.44 

5,666 

184 .00 

.0497 

36.78 



300,000.00 

24,470.00 

6,081.69 

496.06 

300,286.16 

24,493.00 

35,740.81 

2,915.00 

27,408.00 

93,284.95 

83,699.72 

9,585.23 

7,609.00 

6,827.00 

83,544.16 

9,740.79 

6,814.00 

32,469 

794 .00 

.037 

542 .46 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; enginemen, 2; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other train- 
men, 2; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 1; other trackmen, 12; total, 23. Employees, 1923: Number 
general officers, 9; office clerks, 2; station agents, 1; enginemen, 3; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other 
trainmen, 2; carpenters, 2; other shopmen, 17; section foremen, 2; other trackmen, 17; total, 38. 



268 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Virginia and Carolina Southern Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A. W. McLean. . 






J. Q. Beckwith 












A. T. McLean 




A. G. F. and P. A... . . 













DIRECTORS 

A. W. McLean, F. P. Gray, A. T. McLean, H. B. Jennings, A. E. White, L. H. Caldwell, 
;S. F. Caldwell, all of Lumberton, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized January 1, 1907, under Laws of North Carolina. 
Acts 1907, chapter 67, Laws of North Carolina. 



Private Acts 1903, Private 



ROAD OPERATED 



From— 


To- 


Miles 


N. C. 


Total 


Hope Mills, N. C. 




25.23 
27.71 




St. Paul, N. C. 


Elizabethtown, N. C 


52.94 









VIRGINIA AND CAROLINA SOUTHERN RAILROAD 



269' 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 


1922 


1923 




$ 141,000.00 

2,665.00 

524,000.00 

9,898.00 

654,119.00 

12,355.00 

73,551.00 

1,389.00 

13,744.00 

167,269.00 

140,263.00 

27,006.00 

3,159.00 

2,649.00 

132,104.00 

29,666.00 

2,495.00 

38,934 

$ 560 .00 

5,499.00 

.037 

6,949.00 


$ 141,000.00 


Capital stock, per mile ._ 


2,665.00 
524,000.00 


Funded debt, per mile 


9,898.00 
660,275.00 


Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment. .. . . . . . .. 


12,472.00 
73,769.00 




1,393.00 


Cost of road and equipment, per mile.. 


13,865.00 
196,282.00 


Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 


153,283.00 

42,999.00 

37.07 




28.95 




160,327.00 




30,703.00 


Freight revenue, per mile • 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina . 


30.28 

38,490 

$ 580 .00 

5,252.00 

.038 

76.79 







Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 4; station agents, 5; other station men,. 
6; enginemen, 3; firemen, 3; conductors, 3; other trainmen, 5; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shop- 
men, 1; section foremen, 5; other trackmen, 20; other employees, 2; total, 63. Employees, 1923: Num- 
ber general officers, 3; office clerks, 4; station agents, 5; other station men, 6; enginemen, 3; firemen, 
3; conductors, 3; other trainmen, 5; machinists, 2; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 1; section foremen,. 
5; other trackmen, 20; other employees, 2; total, 63. 



270 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Warrenton Railroad Company 





OFFICERS 




Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 






General Manager or Superintendent 


C. R. Rodwell 




Secretary-Treasurer 


A. C. Blalock 











DIRECTORS 

R. B. Boyd, W. G. Rogers, C. E. Jackson, R. T. Watson, H. A. Moseley, M. P. Burwell, 
all of Warrenton, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized April 21, 1876, under Laws of North Carolina. Battle's Revisal. 



ROAD OPERATED 



Warrenton, N. C, to Warren Plains, N. C. (miles). 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt.... 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile.. 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue . . 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



66,000.00 
22,000.00 

5,250.00 

1,750.00 
68,619.82 
22,873.27 
18,951.71 

6,317.24 
29,190.51 
41,237.54 
27,560.88 
13,676.66 
13,745.84 

9,186.96 
39,885.84 

1,351.70 

13,295.28 

1,002 

450 .90 



.07 
1,129.20 



66,000.00 
22,000.00 



51,392.00 

17,130.67 

17,338.01 

5,779.34 

22,916.01 

45,780.40 

38,547.81 

7,232.59 

15,260.13 

12,849.27 

43,647.95 

2,132.45 

14,549.32 

1,072 

710.82 

163.31 

.07 

1,354.50 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 5; station agents, 1; other station men, 4; enginemen, 
1; firemen, 1; other trainmen, 1; total, 13. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 5; station 
agents, 1; other station men, 3; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; other trainmen, 1; total, 12. 



WASHINGTON AND VANDEMERE RAILROAD 



271 



Washington and Vandemere Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




A. D. McLean ... 


Washington, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 


P. R. Albright 

R. D. Cronly 


Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 




John T. Reid 


Wilmington, N. C. 




R. A. Brand 


Wilmington, N. C. 




W. J. Craig 


Wilmington, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

D. McLean, Washington, N. C. ; C. A. Flynn, Washington 



Wilmington, N. C. ; George B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C. 



N. C. ; Lyman Delano, 
R. D. Cronly, Wilmington, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized December 5, 1903, under Laws of North Carolina. Chartered by Act of General 
Assembly, Chapter 245, Private Laws of 1903. Amended by Act of General Assembly, Chap- 
ter 40, Private Laws of 1907. 

ROAD OPERATED 



Washington Junction, N. C, to Vandemere, N. C. (miles). 



40.52 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded deb t 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue.... 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



125,000.00 


$ 125,000.00 


3,157.36 


3,084.90 


217,795.43 


720,000.00 


30,760.18 


17,769.02 


767,155.67 


592,834.57 


19,377.56 


14.630.67 


74,998.60 


74,656.60 


1,894.38 


1,842.46 


21,271.89 


16,473.13 


64,524.87 


55,427.07 


81,682.05 


96,475.60 


♦17,157.18 


41,048.53 


1,592.42 


1,367.89 


2,015.85 


2,380.94 


47,377.43 


39,290.22 


16,052.82 


15,788.83 


1,169.24 


969 .65 


16,904 


17,163 


396.17 


$ 389 .66 


1,094.62 


348 .02 


.0344 


.034 


3,576.23 


3,818.28 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 1; station agents, 3; other station men, 1; enginemen, 
1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; section foremen, 4; other trackmen, 12; other employees, 
2; total, 28. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 1; station agents, 3; other station men, 2; 
enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; section foremen, 4; other trackmen, 14; 
other employees, 2; total, 31. 



♦Deficit. 



272 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Wellington and Powellsville Railroad Company 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




J. A. Pretlow 











DIRECTORS 

A. T. Baker, Board of Trade Building, Norfolk, Va. ; Mrs. Elizabeth Baker, Board of 
Trade Building, Norfolk, Va. ; John H. Small, 939 Munsey Building, Washington, D. C. ; 
E. F. Branning, New York City ; J. A. Pretlow, Franklin, Va. 



HISTORY 

Organized October 20, 1893, under Laws of North Carolina. Laws 1833, Chapter 258, 
amended Chapter 24, 1897. 

ROAD OPERATED 



Windsor, N. C, to Ahoskie, N. C. (miles). 



CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 



Capital stock. 

Capital stock, per mile... 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included). 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile_ 

Total freight revenue ". 

Total passenger-train service revenue 

Freight revenue, per mile.-. 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



90,000.00 


$ 90,000.00 


4,090.91 


4,090.90 


121,766.74 


125,666.77 


5,534.85 


5,712.12 


188,903.99 


188,978.98 


8,586.54 


8,589.95 


76,349.13 


69,451.74 


*67,982.86 


75,493.76 


8,366.27 


6,042.02 


3,470.41 


3,156.89 


3,090.13 


3,431.53 


61,505.15 


57,038.71 


11,735.83 


11,789.52 


2,795.69 


2,592.67 


13,843 




527 .69 


$ 535 .89 


3,108.15 


623.51 


.036 





1,110.81 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 3; office clerks, 1; station agents, 5; other station men, 
1; enginemen, 2; firemen, 2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 8; machinists, 1; carpenters, 2; other shop- 
men, 6; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 15; other employees, 6; total, 57. Employees, 1923: Num- 
ber general officers, 2; office clerks, 1; station agents, 5; other station men, 2; enginemen, 3; firemen, 
2; conductors, 2; other trainmen, 4; machinists, 1; carpenters, 1; other shopmen, 3; section foremen, 3; 
other trackmen, 15; other employees, 2; total, 46. 



'Does not include car hire, $3,294.00; interest, $5,798.60; taxes, $1,350.00. 



WILMINGTON, BRUNSWICK AND SOUTHERN RAILROAD 273 

Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




M. J. Corbett.- 


Wilmington, N. C. 


General Manager or Superintendent 




Wilmington, N. C. 


Walker Taylor... 


Wilmington, N. C. 




H. C. McQueen 


Wilmington, N. C. 




H. M. Shannon 


Wilmington, N. C. 









DIRECTORS 

M. J. Corbett, Wilmington, N. C. ; J. B. Gault, Wilmington, N. C. ; M. W. Divine, 
Wilmington, N. C. ; J. A. Jones, Laurinburg, N. C. ; Walker Taylor, Wilmington, N. C. ; 
J. W. Brooks, Wilmington, N. C. ; H. C. McQueen, Wilmington, N. C. ; C. E. Taylor, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

HISTORY 

Organized January 22, 1907, under laws of North Carolina. The railroad was originally 
built from Navassa to Bolivia by the Town Creek Railroad and Lumber Company. In 1911 
the Wilmington, Brunswick and Southern Railroad was chartered under the corporation 
law and the road was, in 1912, completed to Southport. 



ROAD OPERATED 






30.2 







CAPITAL STOCK, ETC. 



Item 



1922 



1923 






Capital stock 

Capital stock, per mile 

Funded debt 

Funded debt, per mile 

Cost of road 

Cost of road, per mile 

Cost of equipment 

Cost of equipment, per mile 

Cost of road and equipment, per mile 

Operating revenue . 

Operating expenses (interest on bonds not included) 

Net operating revenue 

Operating revenue, per mile 

Operating expenses, per mile 

Total freight revenue ... . 

Total passenger-train service revenue.... 

Freight revenue, per mile... 

Total number passengers carried earning revenue. .. 

Passenger service train revenue, per mile 

Revenue from other sources '.. 

Average receipts per passenger, per mile 

Taxes paid, North Carolina 



165,000.00 


$ 165,000.00 


5,463.59 


5,463.59 


180,000.00 


180,000.00 


5,960.26 


5,960.26 


433,090.81 


433,189.81 


14,340.75 


14,344.03 


44,167.01 


44,167.01 


1,462.48 


1,462.48 


15,803.23 


15,806.51 


65,222.48 


78,740.59 


54,469.94 


78,376.54 


10,752.54 


364 .05 


2,159.69 


2,607.30 


1,803.64 


2,595.25 


42,138.22 


59,781.63 


20,478.67 


16,083.09 


1,395.31 


1,979.52 


17,197 


15,113 


678.10 


$ 53 .25 


2,605.59 


2,875.87 


.0378 


.036838 


1,290.97 


1,330.34 



Employees, 1922: Number general officers, 6; office clerks, 2; station agents, 2; other station men, 
2; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section 
foremen, 2; other trackmen, 15; total, 36. Employees, 1923: Number general officers, 5; office clerks, 
2; station agents, 2; other station men, 2; enginemen, 1; firemen, 1; conductors, 1; other trainmen, 2; 
machinists, 1; other shopmen, 1; section foremen, 3; other trackmen, 15; total, 36. 

Part 11—18 



274 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company 



PRINCIPAL GENERAL OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


Ml 


H. E. Fries 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 


Vice-President 


J. R. Kenly 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Secretary 


J. F. Post 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Treasurer 


John T. Reich 


Wilmington, N. C. 






Winston-Salem, N. C. 




H. C. Prince. 


Wilmington, N. C. 




H. E. Fries. 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 


Chief Engineer 


J. E. Willoughbv 


Wilmington, N. C. 




G. F. Turley 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 




S. P. Collier. .. 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 











DIRECTORS 

H. E. Fries, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; N. D. Maher, Roanoke, Va. ; A. C. Needles, Roanoke, 
Va. ; D. W. Flickwir, Roanoke, Va. ; J. R. Kenly, Wilmington, N. C. ; George B. Elliott, 
Wilmington, N. C. 



HISTORY 

Date of organization, February 13, 1905. 

Organized under the Laws of the State of North Carolina, Private Laws of the State of 
North Carolina, passed by the General Assembly at its session of 1905 (page 93), chapter 
34, entitled "An Act to Incorporate the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company," 
amending sections 10 and 11 of the Private Acts of 1905, chapter 34, page 96, ratified 
January 31, 1907. 

Private Laws of the State of North Carolina, passed by the General Assembly at its 
session of 1909 (page 539), chapter 252, entitled "An Act extending the time for con- 
struction of the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company," ratified March 5, 1909. 

Acts of the General Assembly of .the State of North Carolina, H. B. 888, S. B. 584, 
entitled "An Act to amend the charter of the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway Company," 
amending section 2 of chapter 34 of the Private Laws of North Carolina passed at its 
session of 1905, ratified February 11, 1911. 

Private Laws of the State of North Carolina, passed by the General Assembly at its 
session of 1911 (page 892), chapter 357, entitled "An Act to amend An Act relating to 
the Southbound Railway Company," ratified February 25, 1911. 






WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND BAILWAY 



275 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 5,875,427.77 


Investments : 
Investment in road and equipment 


$ 5,903,741.12 
9,800.00 


* 5,952,005.35 


9,800.00 
20,000.00 


Investments in affiliated companies — stocks 

Other investments — 
Bonds 


9,800.00 






41,862.45 


49,110.28 








5,905,227.77 


5,955,403.57 


6,010,915.63 




Current Assets: 
Cash... 




87,397.98 


126,655.21 
101,540.00 
20,617.04 
31,420.78 
41,667.27 
18,705.28 


79,646.07 


101,240.00 


Special deposits 


100, 640 .00 


18,857.08 

19,453.60 

281,023.57 


Traffic and car-service balances receivable 

Net balance receivable from agents and conductors 
Miscellaneous accounts receivable 


12,594.84 
32,779.32 
53,606.99 


9,615.86 


Material and supplies 


25, 199 .95 


177.08 






6,648.74 


Other current assets 


4,619.98 


595 .46 




Total current assets 




524,413.91 


345,225.56 


305,062.63 




Deferred Assets: 
Working fund advances 




449 .00 


506.85 
227,502.15 


444 .35 


481,653.21 


U. S. Government deferred assets 


131 .54 




Total deferred assets 




482, 102 .21 


228,009.00 


575 .89 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Discount on funded debt 




269,500.00 


262,500.00 
4,324.16 


255,500.00 


3,799.74 


Other unadjusted debits 


33,671.10 




Total unadjusted debits 




273,299.74 


266,824.16 


289, 171 .10 




Grand totals 




7,185,043.63 


6,795,462.29 


6,605,725.25 









276 



N. 0. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ( 


Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 1,245,000.00 


Stock: 


$ 1,245,000.00 


$ 1,245,000.00 




Long-teem Debt: 




5,000,000.00 


5,000,000.00 


5,000,000.00 




Cukbent Liabilities: 




286,800.00 


250.000.00 
209,744.40 
149,971.96 
2,479.06 
101,540.00 


250,000.00 


74,728.28 




183,068.40 


195,822.62 




187,216.75 


6,963.58 




3,267.21 


101,240.00 




100,640.00 








665,554.48 


713,735.42 


724,192.36 




Defebred Liabilities: 




482,158.81 


111,769.27 
5,842.23 


22.53 


11,319.92 




7,230.34 








493,478.73 


117,611.50 


7,252.87 




Unadjusted Cbedits: 




8,732.69 


7,973.04 
95,555.17 

27,198.95 


129 .80 


85,608.02 




105,516.38 




Accrued depreciation — miscellaneous physical 








35,057.22 




13,985.23 










129,397.93 


130,727.16 


119,631.41 




CORPOBATE SUBPLUS: 

Additions to property through income and surplus 




28,904.55 
377,292.06 


41,626.68 
453,238.47 


41,952.34 
532,303.73 








248,387.51 


411,611.79 


490,351.39 




Grand totals 




7,185,043.63 


6,795,462.79 


6,605,725.25 









WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY 



277 



ROAD OPERATED 



Termini Between Which Road Extends 


Miles of 
Road 


Miles of 

Second 

Main 

Track 


Miles of 

Industrial 

Tracks 


Miles of 

Yard 

Track and 

Sidings, 

Etc. 


Total 


1922— 
Winston-Salem to Wadesboro, N. C. . 
Whitney to Badin, N. C._ 


87.70 
5.03 
1.79 


3.02 


6.49 


22.71 


119.92 
5.03 










1.79 












Totals 


94.52 


3.02 


6.49 


22.71 


126 .74 






1923— 
Winston-Salem to Wadesboro, N. C. . 
Whitney to Badin, N. C... 


87.70 
5.03 

1.79 


3.02 


7.27 


22.84 


120.83 
5.03 


Wadesboro to Wadesboro Jet., N. C. 








1.79 












Totals 


94.52 


3.02 


7.27 


22.84 


127 .63 







MILES OF ROAD AT CLOSE OF YEAR— BY STATES 



State 


Line 

Owned — 

Main 

Line 


Line 
Operated 

Under 

Contract, 

Etc. 


Line 
Operated 

Under 
Trackage 

Rights 


Total 
Mileage 
Operated 


1922— 
North Carolina '. 


87.70 


' 5.03 


1.79 


'94.52 






1923— 
North Carolina 


87.70 


5.03 


1.79 


94.52 







278 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING REVENUES 



Class of Railway Operating Revenues 



Amount of Revenue 
for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Freight. 



Excess baggage. 
Mail 



Express 

Other passenger-train. 
Switching 



Rail-line transportation revenue. 



Station, train, and boat privileges 

Parcel room 

Storage— freight 

Storage— baggage 

Demurrage 

Rents of buildings and other property. 
Miscellaneous 



Total incidental operating revenues. 
Joint facility — Cr 

Total railway operating revenues 



856,568.93 

83,789.09 

415.18 

11,782.11 

31,735.85 

78.89 

6,153.30 



$ 1,096,612.99 

101,063.10 

538.62 

10,454.01 

30, 103 .86 

89.73 

8,041.70 



990,525.35 



180 .00 



1,213.67 



5,472.93 

6.83 

98.59 



6,958.36 



132 .90 



997,616.61 



1,246,904.01 



186.00 

.30 

631 .92 

22.20 

10,368.20 



11,492.42 



162.71 



L, 258, 559. 14 



WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY 



279 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES 



Name of Railway Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 



1922 



1923 



Maintenance of Way and Structures: 

Superintendence 

Maintaining roadway and track.- 

Maintaining track structures 

Maintaining ancillary structures 

Injuries to persons 

Other way and structure expense 

Totals -. 

Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Dr 
Maintaining joint tracks, yards, and other facilities — Cr. 

Total maintenance of way and structures 

Maintenance of Equipment: 

Superintendence... ' 

Repairs of machinery and other apparatus 

Locomotive repairs 

Locomotive depreciation and retirements 

Car repairs 

Car depreciation and retirements 

Work equipment repairs 

Work equipment depreciation and retirements 

Injuries to persons 

Other equipment expenses 

Total maintenance of equipment 

Traffic: 
Traffic expenses.. 



8,417.61 
55,064.17 
8,555.41 
9,782.36 
433 .64 
3,399.30 



85,652.49 

24,054.48 

770 .30 



,936.67 



9,943.50 

73.45 

39,384.64 

4,638.60 

57,835.32 

4,143.11 

76.30 

134 .96 

154 .65 

702 .83 



117,087.36 



58,954.43 



8,883.14 
69,838.36 
19,918.43 
6,243.63 
1,021.36 
2,586.94 



108,491.86 

27,537.43 

506.12 



135,523.17 



10,901.07 
204 .72 

62,135.67 
4,638.60 

73,175.55 
6,283.25 
164 .81 
293 .61 
156.70 
620 .79 



158,574.77 



70,163.17 



280 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



RAILWAY OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 




Name of Railway Operatini 


1 Expense Account 


Amount of Operating 
Expenses for the Year 




1922 


1923 


Transportation — Rail Line: 


$ 19,124.14 

25,472.12 

2,267.01 

3,771.98 

1,128.21 

1.67 

38,488.47 

97,343.34 

20,432.94 

42,949.81 

15,154.46 

822 .77 

8,320.85 

5,056.86 

3,950.07 


% 20,887.47 




27,989.23 




2,696.65 




4,505.53 




1,316.86 






Train enginemen and motormen 


51,907.79 




150,954.53 






26,751.55 






55,401.07 




12,727.52 




1,200.55 




6,913.47 




8,747.16 




4,469.24 








Totals 


284,284.70 

94,918.44 

1,157.46 

228 .42 


376,468.72 


Operating joint yards and terminals- 


-Dr 


106,221.25 


Operating joint yards and terminals- 
Operating joint tracks and facilities- 


-Cr 


1,017.07 


-Dr 


262 .02 








378,274.10 


481,934.92 








General: 


30,066.54 

159 .50 

349 .78 

2,809.19 


30,518.46 




146.25 








3,196.85 








Totals 


33,385.01 


33,861.56 




205 .85 












33,385.01 


34,067.41 










696,637.57 


880,263.44 









WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY 



281 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE 



Item 


Amount, 1922 


Amount, 1923 




94.52 


94.52 






Traix-miles: 


125,533 
103,100 


152,609 




113,490 








228,633 


266,099 








928 








Locomotive-miles : 
Freight — 


153,571 
1,346 


202,685 


Light 


1,178 








154,917 


203,863 






Passenger — 


103,100 
290 


113,490 


Light 


1,085 






Total passenger locomotive-miles 


103,390 


114,575 








2,430 


2,051 








260,737 


320,489 








928 








Car-miles: 
Freight train — 


2,374,447 
761,504 


3,183,493 


Empty 


1,160,346 






Sum of loaded and empty 


3,135,951 
125,533 


4,343,839 


Caboose 


151,609 








3,261,484 


4,495,448 






Passenger train- 
Passenger 


210,230 
31,230 
173,222 


225,500 


Parlor, sleeping, and observation 


36,930 


Other 


183,530 






Total passenger train car-miles 


414,682 


445,960 






Total transportation service car-miles 


3,676,166 


4,941,408 






Work service 




25,678 









282 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 



Amount, 1923 



Freight Service: 
Tons- 
Revenue freight 

Nonrevenue freight 

Total tons, freight service 

Ton-miles — 

Revenue freight. 

Nonrevenue freight 

Total ton-miles, freight service 

Passenger Service: 

Passengers carried — revenue. 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Revenues and Expenses: 

Freight revenue 

Passenger revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Mile of Road: 

Freight-train miles 

Passenger-train miles _ 

Transportation service train-miles... 

Work-train miles. 

Locomotive-miles — transportation... 

Freight service car-miles 

Passenger service car-miles 

Freignt revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Ton-miles— re venue freight. 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger-miles — revenue 



797,954 
14,677 



812,631 








55,995,085 
979,655 


1,114,664 
25,353 


56,974,740 


1,140,017 


62,943 
2,419,176 


66,299 
2,924,216 



$ 856,568.93 
83,789.09 
127,801.12 



% 1,096,612.99 
101,063.10 
142,249.32 



997,616.61 
696,637.57 



1,258,559.14 
880,263.44 



300,979.04 



378,295.70 



1,328 

1,091 

2,419 

10 

2,759 

34,506 

4,387 

9,062.30 

1,352.11 

10,554.56 

7,370.27 

3,184.29 

592,415 

602,780 

25,594 



47,560 

4,717 

116,019.10 

1,504.96 

13,315.27 

9,312.09 

4,002.20 

845,409 

850,998 

30,93* 



WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND HALLWAY 



28a 



STATISTICS OF RAIL-LINE OPERATIONS— ENTIRE LINE— Continued 



Item 



Amount, 1922 Amount, 1923 



AVEEAGES PER TRAIN-MILE: 

. Loaded freight car-miles — freight trains 

Empty freight car-miles — freight trains 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Passenger train car-miles — passenger trains 

Revenue passenger-miles 

Freight revenue 

Passenger service train revenue 

Operating revenues 

Operating expenses 

Net operating revenues 

Averages per Locomotive-mile: 

Train-miles — freight trains 

Car-miles — freight trains 

Train-miles — passenger trains 

Car-miles — passenger trains 

Averages per Loaded Freight Car-mile: 

Ton-miles — revenue freight 

Ton-miles — all freight 

Freight revenue... 

Averages per Car-mile — Passenger: 

Passenger-miles — revenue 

Passenger revenue.. 

Miscellaneous Averages: 

Miles hauled — revenue freight 

Miles hauled — nonrevenue freight 

Miles hauled — all freight 

Miles carried — revenue passengers 

Revenue per ton of freight 

Revenue per ton-mile of freight 

Revenue per passenger.. 

Revenue per passenger-mile 

Operating ratio (per cent) 



18.91 

6.07 

446.06 

453 .86 

4.02 

23.46 

6.82 

1.24 

4.36 

3.05 

1.31 



70.17 
66.75 
70.11 
38.44 
1 .07346 
.01530 
1.33119 
.03464 



20.86 

7.60 

523 .61 

532.64 

3.09 

25. 7& 

7.19 

1.25 

4.72 

3.31 

1.04 





.81 




.75 




21.05 




22.05 




1.00 




.91 




4.01 




3.09 




23.58 




25.10 




23.99 




25.50 


$ 


0.36074 


$ 


.34446 




10.02 




12 .OS 


$ 


0.34701 


$ 


0.44801 



71.68 

54.34 

70.13 

44. 1G 

0.81838 

.001307 

1 .52040 

.003454 

69.94 



284 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR 








1922 


1923 


Commodity 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Number 

of 
Carloads 


Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 


Products of Agriculture: 
Wheat 


202 

58 

50 

5 

459 

281 

323 

384 

736 

155 

797 

627 

252 

1,008 

17 

31 


6,918 
1,563 
1,145 
54 
5,802 
5,064 
3,931 
3,241 
7,970 
3,179 

11,105 
8,802 
4,110 

11,636 
314 
484 


196 

45 

51 

15 

391 

338 

320 

626 

631 

175 

913 

709 

165 

798 

13 

29 


6,837 




1,087" 


Oats - --. 


1,132 




282 




4,018 




6,501 


Hay, straw, and alfalfa . 


3,819 




5,494 




6,699 




3,332 




12,762 




9,390 




2,803 




9,006 




280 




666 






Totals 


5,385 


75,318 


5,415 


74,108 






Animals and Products: 


17 
19 
10 
3 
125 


175 
195 
97 
71 
1,723 


19 
17 
7 
5 
120 
4 
1 
1 
33 
2 


209 




179 




71 




83 




1,211 


Poultry 


37 








23 


Wool 


2 
9 
3 


33 

242 

56 


5 




719 




79 






Totals 


188 


2,592 


209 


2,616 






Products of Mines: 


4,477 

110 

33 

2,318 

19 

39 

270 


232,736 

2,852 

1,677 

96,474 

776 

829 

9,914 


6,250 

302 

3 

3,787 

40 

70 

391 


354,260 


Coke - 


9,432 




130 




173,001 




1,500 


Salt 


1,518 




14,809 






Totals 


7,266 


345,258 


10,843 


554,650 







WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY 



285 



REVENUE FREIGHT CARRIED DURING THE YEAR— Continued 



Commodity 



1922 



Number 

of 
Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



1923 



Number 
of 

Carloads 



Number 

of Tons 

(2,000 lbs.) 



Products of Forests: 
Logs, posts, poles, and cordwood. 
Ties - 



Pulp wood 

Lumber, timber, box shooks, staves, and headings. 
Other products of forests 



Totals. 



Manufactures and Miscellaneous: 

Refined petroleum and its products 

Vegetable oils 

Sugar, syrup, glucose, and molasses 

Boats and vessel supplies.. 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Bar and sheet iron, structural iron, and iron pipe. 

Castings, machinery, and boilers.. 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile.. 

Agricultural implements and vehicles other than 

automobiles 

Automobiles and auto trucks 

Household goods and second-hand furniture 

Furniture (new; 

Beverages 

Ice 



Fertilizers (all kinds)... 

Paper, printed matter, and books 

Chemicals and explosives. 

Textiles 

Canned goods (all canned food products). 
Other manufactures and miscellaneous 



Totals. 



Grand totals, carload traffic. 
Merchandise— all L. C. L. freight- 



Grand totals, carload and L. C. L. traffic. 



1,160 
409 



6,598 

4 



171 



6 
71 

10 
149 



250 
236 
837 
216 



35 
809 

67 
946 

32 

48 
515 
172 

25 

247 

139 

1,241 



7,151 



28,161 



29,107 
12,004 



162,926 
66 



1,102 

1,451 

2 

8,763 

105 



204, 103 



11,423 



15,668 

202 

1,971 

312 

6,257 

156 

12,945 

4,662 

8,987 

27,358 

5,560 

2, 128 

444 
4,605 

553 
7,083 

526 

566 
11,946 
3,932 

398 

2,227 

2,919 

21,733 



790 

7 

115 



136 
13 

455 
402 
335 
649 
306 
92 

: 78 

3,073 

59 
642 

29 

84 
536 
181 

26 

241 

110 

1,500 



143,138 



9,859 



770,409 
27,545 



37,749 



797,954 



27,090 

43,471 

34 

216,673 

2,691 



289 .959 



20,677 

193 

2,317 



5,061 

356 

12,494 

6,984 
12,571 
22,580 

7,977 

1,669 

994 

17,036 

400 

4,845 

474 

962 

13,117 

3,640 

408 

2,405 

2,291 

26,934 



166,385 



1,087,718 
26,946 



1,114,664 



•286 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EMPLOYEES, SERVICE, AND COMPENSATION 





1922 


1923 


Class of Employees 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Average 
Number of 
Employees 
in Service 


Compen- 
sation 


Executives, Officials, and Staff Assistants: 
Executives, general officers, and assistants. 


4 


$ 15,217 


4 
1 


$ 15,968 
2,368 










Totals 


4 


15,217 


5 


18,336 






Professional, Clerical, and General: 
Architectural, chemical, and engineering assist- 
ants (A) 


2 
2 

7 
1 
1 
6 

10 

1 
1 


2,112 
4,680 
4,560 

10,418 

710 

1,716 

9,067 

1,800 

23,453 

1,275 

835 






Supervisory or chief clerks (major departments).. 


2 

9 
1 
1 

7 

1 

10 


4,959 
4,863 


Clerks (B) 


13,940 


Clerks (C) 


745 




1,828 




10,828 




1,800 


Traffic agents, advertising and development agents 


27,375 




1 


785 






Totals- 
Daily basis 


14 
19 


31,520 
29,106 


12 
12 


. 32,334 


Hourly basis 


34,004 






Maintenance of Way and Structures: 


1 

1 
9 


2,989 
1,925 
8,672 


1 
2 
9 
4 
2 
4 
9 
50 
1 


3,180 




3,284 




9,694 




5,004 




2 
1 
9 
46 
1 


1,949 

354 

12,182 

18,708 

2,400 


2,000 


Gang foremen (extra gang and work-train laborers) 
Gang or section foremen 


3,162 
15,470 




22,507 




2,400 






Totals— 


68 


2,989 
46, 190 


1 
81 


3,180 




63,521 







WINSTON-SALEM SOUTHBOUND RAILWAY 



287 



CLASSIFICATION OF RESPONDENT'S LOCOMOTIVE, CAR, AND FLOATING EQUIPMENT 

LOCOMOTIVES 





Units Available for Service at Close of Year 


Tractive Power 


Class of Equipment 


Total Number 


Number Fully Owned 




1922 


1923 


1922 


1923 


1922 


1923 




10 


10 


10 


10 


Pounds 
327,000 


Pounds 
327,000 







FREIGHT-TRAIN CARS 





Units Available for Service at Close of Year 


Class of Equipment 


Number Fully Owned 


Aggregate Capacity 




1922 


1923 


1922 


1923 




177 


181 


Tons 

7,277 


Tons 

1,211 







PASSENGER-TRAIN CARS 



Class of Equipment 


Units Available for 

Service at Close of 

Year (Number 

Fully Owned) 




1922 


1923 


Coaches 


10 


9 







288 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



TAXES ON RAILWAY PROPERTY 
OTHER THAN U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Kind of Tax 


Amount Charged to "Railway 
Tax Accruals" in Income 




1922 


1923 


North Carolina 


$ 58,555.54 


$ 68,683.14 







U. S. GOVERNMENT TAXES 



Kind of Tax 



1922— 
Federal income — 

Capital stock 

Documentary stamps 

1923 taxes accrued in 1922 

Total U. S. Government taxes 

1923— 
Income, refund on 1917 taxes — Cr.. 

Capital stock 

Western Union messages 

Documentary stamps 

Total— Cr... 



Amount 

Charged to 

"Railway 

Tax Accruals' 

in Income 



617.00 
50.00 
302 .36 



.36 



2,264.03 

617 .00 

1,587.65 

50.00 



9.38 



AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 



289 



EXPRESS COMPANIES 



American Railway Express Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 



Name 



Official Address 



President 

Vice-President in Charge of Operations... 
Vice-President in Charge of Operations... 
Vice-President in Charge of Operations... 
Vice-President in Charge of Operations... 
Vice-President in Charge of Operations.. . 

Vice-President in Charge of Traffic 

Vice-President in Charge of Accounts 

Secretary 

Vice-President and Treasurer 

General Counsel 

General Auditor 

General Auditor 

General Auditor 

General Auditor 



R. E. M. Cowie.-. 
C. W. Robie 

E. A. Stedman.... 

C. D. Summy 

William G. Smith. 
A. Christeson 

F. S. Holbrook.... 
Charles A. Lutz... 

F. P. Small 

J. W. Newlean 

H. S. Marx 

S. M. Baker 

Richard Burr. 

J. F. Brizzie 

H. D. Freeman... 



New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Chicago, 111. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chicago, 111. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 



DIRECTORS 

J. S. Alexander, W. M. Barrett, Newcomb Carlton, R. E. M. Cowie, H. W. deForest, 
J. H. Harding, W. A. Harriman, Charles Hayden, J. G. Milburn, C. A. Peabody, Mortimer L. 
Schiff, A. H. Wiggin, all of New York City. 



HISTORY 

Organized June, 1918, under Laws of Delaware. 



MILEAGE— BY STATES AND TERRITORIES 






State or Territory 


Total 

Mileage, 

1922 


Total 

Mileage, 

1923 


Alabama . .. .. _ ._ .. __ _ _ 


2,931.37 
3,422.30 
2,115.76 
4,490.04 
8,825.72 
4,536.48 
1,009.99 

315.90 

38.30 

4,420.44 

5,400.00 

351.30 
2,805.68 
11,006.69 


2 931 37 


Alaska _ . . . 


3,817.30 
2 126 63 


Arizona ... . ...... . 


Arkansas 


4 515 09 


California. ... ..... 


8 777 42 


Colorado . . ...... ... ... 


4 536 48 


Connecticut. ... ........ .. ... 


1 009 99 


Delaware. ... .... . .... ....... 


290 90 


District of Columbia. . ... 


38 30 


Florida . . . . . .. 


4,404.44 

5,384.10 

351 30 


Georgia _ . . ..... 


Hawaii. . . 


Idaho. ....... .... ... 


2 787 11 


Illinois 


10,970.62 



Part II— 19 



290 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



MILEAGE— BY STATES AND TERRITORIES— Continued 



State or Territory 



Total 

Mileage, 

1922 



Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota... 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire- 
New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina.. 
North Dakota... 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina.. 
South Dakota... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont. --. 

Virginia... 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin.. 

Wyoming 



Totals, United States. 



British Columbia. 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Quebec. 

Yukon. 

Mexico 



Total assignable- 
Unassignable 



473.31 
304.16 
229.12 
,091.58 
,333.16 
,087.26 
,778.58 
,066.17 
,820.69 
,180.14 
,074.49 
,834.84 
, 758 .53 
,158.46 
,093.44 
,193.86 
,141.91 
,815.76 
,298.44 
,065.26 
.248.58 
,012.24 
,349.31 
,287.30 
,256.41 
213.50 
320.30 
182.07 
264 .40 
,384.09 
084.71 
940 .47 
,027.00 
139.63 
, 652 .44 
,915.18 
,856.87 



231,603.14 



422.90 
310.56 
958.62 
249 .80 
844 .00 
94.23 



234,483.23 
23,394.00 



Grand totals. 



257,877.26 



AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 



291 



OPERATING REVENUES 



Account 



Amount of 
Revenue for 
the Year 1922 



Amount of 
Revenue for 
the Year 1923 



TRANSPORTATION : 

Express — domestic 

Miscellaneous 

Total transp ortation. 

Contract Payments: 
Express privileges — Dr 

Revenue from transportation 

Operations Other Than Transportation: 

Customs brokerage fees 

Order and commission 

Rents for buildings and other property 

C. O. D. checks 

Profit on exchange and other financial revenue 
Miscellaneous 

Total other than transportation 

Total operating revenues 



$ 291,345,560.98 
3,754.11 



$ 309,575,843.61 
3,630.49 



291, 349, 315 .( 



142,323,021.57 



149,026,293.52 



219,123.07 
4,285.09 

317,788.70 

2,278,859.04 

5,714.07 

651,107.19 



3,476,877.16 



152,503,170. 



309,579,474.10 



155,736,204.58 



153,843,269.52 



213,061.07 

4,967.78 

225,500.37 

2,442,064.79 

5,943.02 

708,954.59 



J.491.62 



157,443,761.14 



OPERATING EXPENSES 



Account 



For Year 1922 



For Year 1923 



Maintenance: 

Superintendence . 

Buildings and appurtenances — repairs 

Buildings and appurtenances — depreciation _ 

Buildings and appurtenances — retirements 

Cars — repairs .._ 

Cars — depreciation __ 

Cars — retirements — Cr __ 

Horses — depreciation 

Horses — retirements 

Automobiles — repairs. 

Automobiles— depreciation. ._ 

Automobiles — retirements 

Wagons and sleighs — repairs :.. 

Wagons and sleighs — depreciation 

Wagons and sleighs — retirements 

Harness equipment — repairs 

Harness equipment — depreciation and retirements. 

Office furniture and equipment — repairs 

Office furniture and equipment — depreciation and retirements. 

Office safes — repairs 

Office safes — depreciation and retirements 

Trucks — repairs 

Trucks — depreciation and retirements 

Stable and garage equipment— repairs 

Stable and garage equipment — depreciation and retirements... 

Line equipment — repairs 

Line equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Sh op equipment — repairs 



226,594.23 


$ 266,102.46 


241,928.94 


352,825.69 


429,972.98 


429,200.42 


111,496.22 


14,654.36 


140,764.01 


192,244.71 


59,634.58 


59,515.92 


1,379.43 


1,110.86 


350,601.89 


214,876.91 


98,096.49 


82,178.48 


343,209.48 


2,470,462.89 


730,254.16 


1,088,902.17 


63,956.25 


121,326.80 


988,730.57 


723,377.52 


208,242.35 


187,912.76 


86,607.06 


81,937.32 


179,139.32 


172,621.39 


87,521.81 


63,711.26 


151,435.22 


159,970.18 


453,915.15 


302,108.78 


12,434.50 


10,530.51 


28,965.52 


43,789.96 


481,281.24 


450,130.56 


227,179.46 


176,898.22 


8,374.64 


15,767.39 


19,628.67 


30,394.44 


31,732.05 


29,043.13 


82,595.16 


34,952.76 


6,149.70 


7,697.55 



292 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 



Account 



For Year 1922 



For Year 1923 



Maintenance— Continued 

Shop equipment— depreciation and retirements.- 

Miscellaneous equipment — repairs... 

Miscellaneous equipment — depreciation and retirements. 
Oth er e xpenses 



Total maintenance. 

Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Advertising 

Stationery and printing 
Other expenses.. 



Total traffic. 



Trans portation : 

Superintendence — transportation 

Office employees 

Commission... 

Office supplies and expenses 

Rent of local offices 

Vehicle employees 

Stable and garage employees 

Stable and garage supplies and expenses. 

Drayage 

Train employees 

Train supplies and expenses 

Stationery and printing 

Loss and damage 

Damage to property 

Injuries to persons 

Other expenses 



Total transportation. 



General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers 

Salaries and expenses of clerks and attendants. 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Insurance 

Fidelity bond premiums. 

Pensions 

Stationery and printing 

. Other expenses 



Total general. 



Recapitulation: 

Maintenance 

Traffic 

Transportation. 
General. 



Total operating expenses 

Ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues. 



12,974.55 

23.90 

416.66 



12,260.70' 

56.95 

1,846.53 

158 .72 



7,862,477.33 



7,795,546.58 



166,210.33 

29,292.21 

56,490.99 

92.86 



182,574.72 

29,042.46 

96,269.19 

30 .23 



252,086.39 



307,916.60 



,317,598.17 
,019,550.59 
,042,014.57 
,238,448.70 
,064,874.50 
,385,654.75 
,723,454.89 
,183,008.18 
,607,062.36 
,767,023.70 
969,457.68 
,161,086.03 
,921,205.69 
110,226.27 
800,000.00 
278,388.48 



5,377 

54,289 

11,468 

3,291 

4,451 

28,044 

2,606 

6,061 

1,850 

11,011 

885 

2,280 

3,870 

130 

891 



,108.18 
, 165 .46 
, 300 .59 
,048.46 
,443.23 
,092.89 
,842.10 
,089.84 
,181.62 
,502.81 
,115.07 
, 667 .66 
,908.76 
,648.13 
,000.00 
, 565 .78 



130,589,054.56 



136,577,680.58 



356,041.54 

8,176,396.84 

548,311.82 

257.861.89 

384,752.61 

6,146.98 

464,077.51 

191,190.17 

53,623.53 



363,346.74 
,351,164.32 
574,660.69 
318,991.83 
397,180.43 

15,862.42 
504,415.42- 
182,030.18 

57,447.75 



10,438,402.89 



9,765,099.78 



7,862,477.33 

252,086.39 

130,589,054.56 

10,438,402.89 



7,795,546.58 

307,916.60 

136,577,680.58 

9,765,099.78 



149,142,021.17 



154,446,243.54 



97 .80 



C8.10 



AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 



293 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$35,639,587.57 


Investments: 


$35,909,858.48 

9,910,000.00 

6,945,685.03 

3,659,500.00 

387.96 

90,070.59 


$ 40,038,840.17 


9,900,000.00 


Notes (U. S. Treasury) . 


9,546,323.02 


1,142,226.50 




7,340,630.06 


10,901,888.75 






964 .00 




281 .44 






60,070.59 








57,584,766.92 


56,516,502.06 


56,986,145.28 




Current Assets: 
Cash 




19,492,989.62 


18,251,957.56 

1,131.25 

955,655.89 

285,250.50 

9,901,139.37 

4,465,810.10 

2,410,434.37 

252,886.04 

28,135.00 


15,741,989.15 


457 .00 




13,754.00 


5,643.00 




2,805,976.74 


198,398.21 




66,113.97 


7,860,570.39 


Net balances receivable from agents and messen- 


9,323,733.73 


5,807,582.60 




4,366,717.84 


2,134,328.66 




1,732,131.15 


203,620.17 


Interest, dividends, and rents receivable 


218,339.28 


32,365.00 




29,650.00 








35,735,954.65 


36,552,400.00 


34,298,405.86 




Unadjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance.. 
Taxes paid in advance 




421,567.28 
94,989.59 


270,171.73 

89,281.58 

1,323,912.32 


450,602.56 
85,214.04 


1,391,912.15 


Other unadjusted debits 


1,129,827.56 




Total unadjusted debits „_' 




1,908,469.02 


1,633,365.63 


1,665,644.16 








95,229,190.59 


94,752,267.77 


92,950,195.30 









294 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 





COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET— ( 


Continued 




Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Liabilities 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 34,642,000.00 


Stock: 


$34,642,000.00 


$ 34,642,000.00 




Cukkbnt Liabilities: 




508,179.57 


445,162.81 
5,706,041.80 
2,320,700.97 
17,407,868.14 
1,012,287.40 


80,275.80 


5,538,290.70 




5,312,873.03 


277,884.82 




1,695,088.66 


16,519,340.40 




18,916,945.91 


956,867.40 




950,184.39 


71,730.00 


Unmatured interest, dividends, and rents pay- 
able . 




4,097,465.57 




264,194.07 


45,570.29 








27,969,758.46 


27,156,255.19 


27,000,938.08 




Deferred Liabilities: 




15,293.87 


1,823,516.31 


2,437,537.23 




Unadjusted Credits: 




22,106,845.29 


19,041,546.04 

1,610,357.11 

8,514,943.92 

221,120.98 


14,292,295.04 


1,294,461.10 




2,018,679.56 


7,282,933.33 




9,941,937.08 


399,658.66 




271,323.90 








31,083,898.38 


29,387,968.05 


26,524,235.58 




Corporate Surplus: 




1,518,239.88 


1,742,528.22 


2,345,484.41 




Grand totals ... 




95,229,190.59 


94,752,267.77 


92,950,195.30 









AMERICAN RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 



295 



EQUIPMENT OWNED 



1922 



Number 



Value 



1923 



Number 



Value 



Cars 

Horses 

Automobiles — 

Gasoline 

Electric 

Trailers 

Wagons and sleighs — 

Wagons, double.. 

Wagons, single 

Sleighs... 

Buggies 

Harness equipment . 

Office furniture and equipment. 

Office safes 

Trucks 

Stable equipment... 

Garage equipment 

Line equipment — 

Safes, car 

Safes, messenger 

Trunks, packing 

Other line equipment 

Shop equipment 

Miscellaneous equipment 



254 
14,236 

2,595 

1,114 
71 

5,027 
7,594 
2,851 



661,998.45 
1,019,378.14 

2,519,255.37 

1,771,028.89 

104,650.01 

1,043,140.87 

456,866.27 

81,264.60 

2,218.63 

213,008.30 

1,852,023.01 

337,890.32 

957,156.58 

10,426.61 

90,814.13 

198,752.24 
35,357.69 
44,287.88 
52,803.53 
138,795.02 
883,819.00 



254 
12,312 

3,367 

1,430 

120 

4,763 
5,883 
2,387 

58 



605,654.15 
775,893.58 

4,489,377.69 

2,681,318.03 

163,059.82 

946,662.66 

321,328.00 

59,125.66 

1,566.34 

169,365.93 

1,666,004.86 

291,873.82 

1,064,574.92 

12,814.95 

241,703.07 

164,385.03 
90,738.62 
58,590.98 
64,921.11 
141,323.44 
721,311.55 



Totals. 



33,811 



12,474,935.54 



30,574 



14,731,594.21 



296 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



Southeastern Express Company 



OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 
















F. W. Woods 






Sanders McDaniel 


Atlanta, Ga. 




J. E. O'Keeffe 


Atlanta, Ga. 




J. E. Skaggs ._ •. 






C. B. Williams 











DIRECTORS 

H. C. Armstrong, Selma, Ala. ; George L. Baker, Columbia, S. C. ; J. B. Hockaday, 
Atlanta, Ga. ; Charles A. Lyerly, Chattanooga, Tenn. ; Robert F. Maddox, Atlanta, Ga. ; 
R. A. Brown, Birmingham, Ala. ; J. P. Matthews, Columbia, S. C. 



HISTORY 

Organized, 1920, under Laws of Alabama. 



MILEAGE BY STATES AND TERRITORIES 



State or Territory 


Total 

Mileage, 

1922 


Total 

Mileage, 

1923 




1,596.85 


1,605.35 




36.00 




4.15 
194.17 
1,262.08 
318.86 
236.03 
382.31 
40.58 
281 .87 
771.78 


4.15 


Florida __ .. 


310.13 




1,299.10 




318.86 




351 .23 




384 .31 




40.58 


Maryland .- .. 


240 .87 




797 .49 




2.00 




1,447.57 
1.08 
35.70 
1,194.80 
1,292.72 
1,316.88 


1,497.57 


Ohio 


1.08 




57.70 




1,242.70 




1,292.72 




1,130.88 






Totals... 


10,377.43 


10,612.74 






Recapitulation — 


9,779.71 

40.72 

557 .00 


9,969.42 




157 .92 




388 .00 




97.40 








Totals 


10,377.43 


10,612.74 







SOUTHEASTERN EXPRESS COMPANY 



297 



OPERATING REVENUES 



Account 


Amount of 
Revenue for 
the Year 1922 


Amount of 
Revenue for 
the Year 1923 


Transportation : 


$ 7,102,673.95 


$ 7,865,851.36 




1.72 










7,102,673.95 
3,319,609.85 


7,865,853.08 


Contract Payments: 


3,877,022.26 








3,783,064.10 


3,988,830.88 






Operations Other than Transportation: 


40.52 


50.23 




2.97 




3,310.87 

1,533.57 

92,350.97 


2,593.99 




7,578.20 


C. 0. D. checks 


97,873.35 








97,235.93 










3,880,300.03 









OPERATING EXPENSES 



Account 


For Year 1922 


For Year 1923 


Maintenance: 


$ 6,394.84 

6,458.15 

9,061.65 

463.91 

38,952.74 

68,862.24 

8,805.05 

5,512.55 

142.33 

1,149.58 

1,166.63 

1,105.96 

3,558.36 

549 .35 

591.19 

10,840.31 

5,887.39 

60.61 

85.33 

1,153.18 


$ 11,658.69 




9,840.68 




5,924.93 




599 .48 




66,736.34 




90,244.31 




15,855.86 




4,000.23 








1,691.43 




945 .09 




4,210.80 


Office furniture and equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Office safes — repairs.. 


7,049.82 
605 .56 


Office safes — depreciation and retirements 


858 .70 




12,962.38 


Trucks — depreciation and retirements 


5,840.48 




425 .24 


Stable and garage equipment — depreciation and retirements 

Line equipment — repairs 


137.64 
420 .47 


Line equipment — depreciation and retirements . 


1,269.02 








Total maintenance 


173,038.09 


241,277.15 







29S 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



OPERATING EXPENSES— Continued 



For Year 1922 



For Year 1923 



Traffic: 

Superintendence 

Advertising 

Stationery and printing 

Total traffic 

Transportation : 

Superintendence — transportation 

Office employees 

Commission 

Office supplies and expenses 

Rent of local offices... 

Vehicle employees 

Stable and garage employees 

Stable and garage supplies and expenses 

Dray age. 

Train empl oyees 

Train supplies and expenses 

Stationery and printing 

Loss and damage 

Damage to property . 

Injuries to persons 

Other expenses 

Total transportation 

General: 

Salaries and expenses of general officers.. 

Salaries and expenses of clerks and attendants. 

General office supplies and expenses 

Law expenses 

Insurance 

Fidelity bond premiums 

Stationery and printing 

Other expenses 

Total general 

Recapitulation : 

Maintenance 

Traffic 

Transportation 

General 

Total operating expenses.. 

Ratio of operating expenses to operating revenues (per cent) 



17,012.70 
4,805.75 
6,416.53 



28,234.< 



128,894.55 

,108,249.99 

473,119.14 

75,860.54 

148,503.21 

432,857.01 

12,250.68 

154,299.57 

6,508.18 

533,124.02 

9,067.72 

93,456.46 

134,061.65 

1,067.61 

6,627.89 

843 .73 



3,318,791.95 



32,182.74 

121,861.76 

7,986.61 

22,460.39 

29,877.82 

6,562.42 

8,156.88 

1,097.96 



230,186.58 



173,038.09 

28,234.98 

3,318,791.95 

230,186.58 



3,750,251 



9 

1,093 

540 

63 

132 

470 

14 

164 

7 

542 

11 

104 

107 

11 



,501.75 
, 650 .54 
,118.07 
,304.19 
,006.64 
,058.19 
,942.89 
,117.29 
,094.20 
,357.27 
,822.77 
, 654 .32 
, 799 .38 

732.76 
,167.80 

654.17 



3,401,311.83 



32,030.34 

125,115.01 

10,533.12 

18,948.63 

35,749.99 

8.928.40 

11,420.05 

861.62 



243,587.16 



241,277.15 

22,000.56 

3,401,311.83 

243,587.16 



3,908,176.70 



95.39 



SOUTHEASTERN EXPRESS COMPANY 



299 



COMPARATIVE GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 



Balance at 

Beginning of 

Year 1922 


Assets 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1922 


Balance at 
Close of 
Year 1923 


$ 1,048,644.51 


Investment: 


$ 1,074,289.31 


$ 1,207,632.09 


Current Assets: 




635,032.14 


1,414,850.13 


968,728.92 






35.00 


76,406.89 


Net balances receivable from agents and messen- 


81,186.49 
54,979.90 
20,628.63 


81,594.27 


50,083.34 




69,107.23 


41,534.27 




17,738.51 








803,056.64 


1,571,645.15 


1,137,203.93 




Un adjusted Debits: 
Rents and insurance premiums paid in advance. . 




12,326.33 
10.00 


6,589.96 
1,734.42 












12,336.33 


8,324.38 










1,864,037.48 


2,654,258.84 


2,344,836.02 




Liabilities 
Stock: 




1,000,000.00 


1,000,000.00 


1,000,000.00 




Current Liabilities: 




78,759.49 


47,960.95 

1,011.82 

597,603.17 

170,567.63 

522,176.62 

20,345.57 

43,478.87 


26', 243 .96 


12,069.08 






200,881.40 




235,457.98 


244,367.14 




191,817.63 


174,764.60 




408,591.13 


3,492.02 




9,873.31 


46,700.00 


Unmatured interest, dividends, and rents payable 


35,000.00 


761,033.73 


1,403,144.63 


906,984.01 




Unadjusted Credits: 




44,492.51 


56,862.24 

9,393.76 

146,913.43 

37,939.78 


37,311.24 


3,518.61 




19,234.44 


54,785.46 




261,634.25 


207.17 




66,826.08 








103,003.75 


251,114.21 


385,006.01 




Corporate Surplus: 








52,846.00 




Grand totals 






1,864,037.48 


2,654,258.84 


2,344,836.02 









300 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



EQUIPMENT OWNED 





1922 


1923 




Number 


Value 


Number 


Value 




209 

118 
39 

172 
17 


$ 37,640.62 

404,195.48 
172,097.73 

40,809.53 
15,683.78 
11,804.35 
73,179.13 
24,517.66 
39,526.15 
680.16 
171.20 

6,746.22 

1,522.43 

3,342.78 

347.37 


209 

151 
31 

26 
189 


$ 21,224 64 


Automobiles — 


391 247 09 




92 647 49 


Wagons and sleighs — 


10,560.84 




29 393 58 




9,873.92 








71,204.97 








22,820.45 


Trucks 






51,271.20 








345.17 






128.37 


Line equipment — 




5,728.41 








1,167.70 








2,554.13 








1,006.84 










Totals 


555 


832,464.59 


606 


711,174.80 









TAXES 






State 


1922 


1923 


Alabama . . ._. .. 


S 10,393.23 

994.12 

1,485.21 

8,634.09 

527 .62 

436 .84 

735 .72 

2,111.80 

857.71 

6,544.26 

315.27 

19,301.53 

299 .00 

.64 

8,417.93 

7,825.38 

4,642.02 

5,665.00 


$ 8,831.73 




152 .70 




978 .06 




8,992.17 




99.59 




856.65 




1,148.62 




1.713.15 




902.16 




3,606.49 




1,137.97 




12,857.40 


Ohio 


608 .35 


Pennsylvania. _ 


2.70 




19,468.29 




10,173.61 




6,339.51 




10,328.75 








Totals 


■79,187.40 


88,197.90 







THE PULLMAN COMPANY 



301 



THE PULLMAN COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 




E. F. Carry 

J. F. Kane 

G. S. Fernald 


Chicago, 111. 


Secretary 

General Counsel 


Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 



PROPERTY OPERATED 





1922 


1923 


Total length of main lines of railroads over which its cars are run 


178,869.00 
1,913.14 


176,322.00 


Mileage in North Carolina. _ _ . , 


1,913.14 







CAPITAL STOCK 








1922 


1923 


Capital stock. . .. 


$135,000,000.00 


$135,000,000.00 







302 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH-CABLE COMPANY 

OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Charles H. Mackay.. . . 


New York, N. Y. 


Vice-President and General Manager 


Edward Reynolds. 






E. C. Piatt. . 


New York, N. Y 




E. C. Piatt.... 




Assistant Treasurer 




New York, N. Y. 




Robert J. Hall 


New York, N Y 




Milton W. Blackmar 


New York, N. Y. 




William B. Dunn 


New York, N. Y. 









RECEIPTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 



1922 



1923 



Commercial telegraph tolls, interstate 

Commercial telegraph tolls, interstate local. 

Commercial telegraph tolls, intrastate 

Government telegraph tolls, interstate 

Government telegraph tolls, interstate local. 

Government telegraph tolls, intrastate 

Press telegraph tolls, interstate ._. 

Press telegraph tolls, interstate local.. _. 

Press telegraph tolls, intrastate 

Other telegraph transmission revenue 

Stock and commercial news 

Money transfer tolls 

Money transfer premiums 

Messenger service 

Telegraph tolls on cable messages 

Telephone receipts, interstate 

Telephone receipts, intrastate 

Rents for leased wires...' 

Rents from other operated property 

Miscellaneous rent income 



$ 152,276.47 



43,202.37 



1,542.39 
7,918.24 
1,901.41 



7.30 

795 .72 



1,779.38 
2,118.95 
1,145.00 



Totals. 



212,687.23 



78,367.01 

66,932.66 

31,950.08 

570 .27 

95.79 

194 .08 

1,620.81 

2,785.72 

4,288.44 

1,606.11 

7,395.16 

1,302.84 

893 .27 

11.18 

696 .00 

7,500.67 

12,138.00 

446.10 

1,771.94 

1,560.00 



221,858.10 



POSTAL TELEGRAPH-CABLE COMPANY 



303 



EXPENSES 



1922 



1923 



Testing and regulating 

Supervision of operations 

Wages — operators 

Wages — bookkeepers and clerks 

Commission 

Messenger service 

Telephone service 

Rents of telegraph offices. > 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Stationery and printing 

Operating power 

Advertising 

Traffic damages 

Workmen's compensation 

Accidents and damages 

Law expenses connected with damages. 

Repairs of office equipment 

Central Business Bureau 

General law expenses 

Minor rents for property 

Salaries of general officers 

Salaries of general office clerks 

Expenses of general officers and clerks.. 

General stationery and printing 

Supply store salaries and expense 

Other general office expenses 

Plant supervision expenses 

Supervision of maintenance... 

Engineering expenses 

Repairs of aerial plant 

Motor vehicle expense 

Repairs of underground plant. 

Other operating expenses 

Bad customers 

Pensions and relief. 

Taxes 

Development and research 



90.00 

39,442.97 

34,817.88 

18,429.01 

6,853.61 

22,134.60 

1,896.61 

17,494.09 

4,505.96 

1,900.24 

1,449.92 

8.105.13 

439 .70 



641 .23 

212.14 

2,772.47 



3,797.82 
1,499.90 
4,403.69 
3,913.03 

718.59 
5,993.36 
6,055.11 

958 .03 
1,942.63 

421 .85 

1,767.00 

34,648.78 

2,711.96 

218.86 
2,636.19 
1,187.48 

610 .95 
4,926.95 



12.00 

44,709.45 

40,017.66 

21,725.84 

6,976.14 

25,081.10 

2,012.09 

22,874.04 

4,977.79 

2,526.85 

1,411.89 

721 .80 

2,060.65 

88.15 

506 .42 

330 .00 

748.37 

175 .30 

253 .59 

2,371.62 

2,344.58 

2,966.33 

719.01 

466.31 

805 .76 

1,392.75 

2,011.06 

281 .70 

1,612.59 

31,878.62 

367.87 

2,970.92 

512.51 
5,135.82 

29.94 



Totals. 



249,627.74 



233,106.52 



304 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY 

Organized April, 1851, under Laws of New York 
OFFICERS 



Title 


Name 


Official Address 


President 


Newcomb Carlton 

W. G. Sale. 


195 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 


District Plant Supt. of N. C 


L. H. Beck. 











PROPERTY OPERATED 



1922 



1923 



Number telegraph offices — North Carolina 

Number telegraph offices — entire line 

Miles of pole lines — North Carolina.. 

Miles of pole lines — entire line 

Miles of open wire — North Carolina 

Miles of open wire — entire line 

Miles of cable — North Carolina 

Miles of cable — entire line 

Miles of wire in cables — North Carolina.. _ 
Miles of wire in cables — entire line 



463 


466 


24,580 


~~ 24,678 


4,227 


4,222 


213,804 


211,318 


28,839 


29,003 


347,772 


1,353,747 


17 


18 


28,925 


29,683 


626 


702 


186,207 


203,652 



CAPITAL STOCK 



1922 and 1923 



Capital stock. 



$ 99,817,100.00 



RECEIPTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 



1922 



1923 



Receipts from business wholly within North Carolina 

Receipts from State of North Carolina for interstate and miscel- 
laneous business. 



331,180.10 



948,818.47 



378.537.77 



1,094,256.18 



DISBURSEMENTS IN NORTH CAROLINA 



1922 



1923 



Conducting operations 

Current maintenance and depreciation 

General expenses 

Ta xes 

Totals 



$ 806,905.73 

338,264.45 

45,863.83 

43,024.67 



$ 928,288.78 

312,044.13 

51,235.09 

53,537.40 



1,231,058.68 



1,345,103.40 






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Part 11—20 



ASHEVILLE POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 



307 



Asheville Power and Light Company 

Incorporated April, 1912, under general laws of North Carolina. The principal office is at 104 
Patton Avenue, Asheville, N. C. Officers: W. M. Darbee, Vice-President, New York City; Charles S. 
Walters, Vice-President, Asheville; E. P. Summerson, Secretary, New York City; A. C. Ray, Treasurer, 
New York City; and B. M. Jones, Assistant Treasurer, Asheville, N. C. 

Electricity is furnished for lighting purposes to the following cities and towns: Asheville, Bilt- 
more, Kenilworth, Haw Creek, Woolsey, Norwood Park, Chunn's Cove, Grace, Beaverdam, Emma, 
French Broad, and Skyland, N. C. This company does not wholesale electricity. Respondent oper- 
ates gas properties in Asheville and electric street railway properties in Asheville and Biltmore, N. C. 





BALANCE SHEET 




Assets 


Liabilities 


Title of Account 


Balance at 
End of Year 


Title of Account 


Balance at 
End of Year 




$ 3,354,215.26 

51,503.03 

505,000.00 

49,068.64 

4,661.33 

75,650.85 

7,951.25 

31,382.50 

2.00 

1,675.00 

11,416.47 

80,650.91 




$ 1,808,520.00 




Long-term debt 


1,220,000.00 






31,925.03 






29,599.03 






38,616.15 




Miscellaneous current liabilities- 


2,072.93 




38,340.29 






18,590.53 




Miscellaneous accrued liabilities- 
Retirement reserve 

Casualty and insurance reserve- 


324.04 




441,100.63 


Unamortized debt expense . 


90,038.00 
7,500.14 






446,549.57 




Total 




Total 


$ 4,173,177.24 


$ 4,173,177.24 









PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT 





Dr. 


Cr. 




$ 


$ 372,922 53 


Balance transferred from income account _. . _.. . 




316,166.13 


Dividend appropriations of surplus... ... .. . . . 


147,294.04 
103,199.93 


8,713.39 


Appropriations to reserves . 






4,170.25 




4,928.76 








Balance at the end of the fiscal period.. . 




% 446,549.57 









308 



N. C. CORPORATION COMMISSION 



DIVIDENDS DECLARED DURING THE YEAR 



Name of Security on Which 
Dividend was Declared 


Rate per 
Share 


Number of 
Shares on 

Which Divi- 
dend was 
Declared 


Distribution of Charge 


Income 


Profit and 
Loss 


1st preferred 


$ 7 
2H 


varied 
40,000 




$ 38,580.65 
100,000.00 






Total 








$ 138,580.65 













OPERATING REVENUES— ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 



Name of Revenue Account 



Amount of 
Revenue 
for Year 



Metered sales to general consumers.. 
Flat rate sales to general consumers 

Municipal street lighting 

Merchandise and jobbing 

Miscellaneous operating revenues 

Total 



439,150.37 

9,631.99 

25,710.05 

7,005.53 

659.30 



482,157.24 



OPERATING EXPENSES— ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 



Name of Operating Expense Account 



Amount of Expense 
for Year 



Power plant supplies and expenses 

Maintenance of power plant 

Power gas from other sources.. 

Distribution operation and maintenance- 
Utilization operation and maintenance... 

Commercial administration 

Agents' commissions. 

New business expenses.. 

Undistributed general expenses 

Injuries and damages 

Duplicate miscellaneous charges — Cr 



Total operating expenses. 



82.83 



14,310.03 



70,942.71 
7,232.35 



82.83 

102,501.54 

30,422.21 

5,131.37